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Colorado Debates Minimum Wage Measure

Colorado is among a handful of states where voters are being asked if the minimum wage should be increased. Proponents say the bump for the lowest-paid workers would help struggling families. Many businesses say it could prompt layoffs. Loree Lattick, a home healthcare worker in Lakewood, earns a wage significantly higher than the state's $8.31 minimum. She's making $13 an hour and says that amount wouldn't be enough to get by if she didn't have Social Security benefits, too.

Oliver Stone's 'Snowden' - A Generic Spy Picture With A Little Sex

With films like Nixon, JFK and Natural Born Killers floating around my brain, I went into Oliver Stone's Snowden expecting at least a lot of flash and dazzle. What passed on screen, though, was thoroughly conventional filmmaking, and maybe for the first time, an Oliver Stone film is simply dull and unimaginative.

Cities Cope With Polluted Ag Runoff, Create Their Own Pollution Too

Standing on a platform above the eastern bank of the Missouri River at the Kansas City, Missouri, Water Services' intake plant is like being on the deck of a large ship. Electric turbines create a vibration along the blue railing, where David Greene, laboratory manager for Kansas City Water Services, looks out across the river. Water the color of chocolate milk is sucked up and forced through screens below, picking up all the debris the river carries downstream.

Convincing Colorado Students That Clinton Can Keep The Fire "Berning"

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was a live wire for college students during primary season – especially in Colorado. Sanders won the state's Democratic caucus in March. But the party's candidate is Hillary Clinton. That's what brought Jack Califano to the campus of Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

Convincing Colorado Students That Clinton Can Keep The Fire "Berning"

Absent Regulation, Farmers Dabble In Voluntary Measures To Curb Harmful Runoff

On a gray day, just as the rain begins to fall, Roger Zylstra stops his red GMC Sierra pick-up truck on the side of the road and hops down into a ditch in Jasper County, Iowa. It takes two such stops before he unearths amid the tall weeds and grasses what he's looking for. "Here is one of the tiles," he says, pointing to a pipe about six or eight inches in diameter. Water trickles from it into a culvert that runs under the road after flowing through a network of underground drainage lines below his farm field. "That's where it outlets." Water like this is called runoff and it can contain harmful chemicals, such as nitrates from fertilizer that plants don't absorb or excess pesticides. For years, contaminants like these have reached public waterways.

Absent Regulation, Farmers Dabble In Voluntary Measures To Curb Harmful Runoff

Farmers Feel The Pressure To Fight Agricultural Water Pollution

Living in the Platte River Valley in central Nebraska means understanding that the water in your well may contain high levels of nitrates and may not be safe to drink. "When our first son was born in 1980, we actually put a distiller in for our drinking water here in the house," says Ken Seim, who lives in the Platte Valley near the town of Chapman, Nebraska. "And at that time our water level was a 12 parts per million." Nitrates are formed when nitrogen, from the air or fertilizer, is converted by bacteria in the soil to a form that is more plant-friendly. Nitrates help plants grow, but can be dangerous in large amounts. The legal limit in public water systems is 10ppm. Some nearby wells, Seim says, contain nitrates at dangerous levels, two or three times the legal threshold.

How Are Nitrates Ending Up In Drinking Water Supplies?

Contaminated drinking water isn't just a problem for Flint, Michigan. Many towns and cities across the Midwest and Great Plains face pollution seeping into their water supplies. A big part of the problem: farming and ranching. Farmers spread nitrogen- and phosphorous-based fertilizers on their fields to help their crops grow. Excess nutrients, though, can leach into groundwater or seep into rivers, creeks, canals or ditches that eventually feed into the Mississippi River. In high concentrations, these chemical compounds damage aquatic life and burden small towns that have to remove them from their water supply.

From Toronto To The Telluride Film Festival, Here's Howie's Top Picks

Going from the Telluride Film Festival to the Toronto Film Festival is like a sea change. Telluride is green and surrounded by mountain views that take your breath away. Toronto is traffic and cement, publicists, multiplex theaters, and all the other apparatus for buying and selling movies. In Telluride, you may have the chance to talk to a filmmaker informally on the street, or waiting for a movie to start. In Toronto, interviews are scheduled. They take place in bland conference spaces or expensive yet sterile hotel rooms. Awful places.

From Toronto To The Telluride Film Festival, Here's Howie's Top Picks

From Hickenlooper To House, Colorado Leaders On Ballot Battle For A Presidential Primary

There were controversies over how parties in Colorado nominated their candidates earlier this year. Some voters felt excluded or confused by the process. Now voters have a chance to change the system. In November, a ballot issue asks if the state should switch to a presidential primary instead of a caucus where local party activists select a candidate. Another asks if local primaries should be open to unaffiliated voters.

From Hickenlooper To House, Colorado Leaders On Ballot Battle For A Presidential Primary

From Standing Rock To Denver: Why Protesters Oppose Dakota Access Pipeline

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world. That long list includes Denver.

From Standing Rock To Denver: Why Protesters Oppose Dakota Access Pipeline

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