Take Care

Take Care

From WRVO

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.More from Take Care »

Most Recent Episodes

Rebuilding the doctor-patient relationship

When you visit the doctor you might feel like you spend more time in the waiting room than in the actual examination room. But with dozens of patients a day, it can be difficult for primary care doctors to spend more time with each person. This week on "Take Care," Tom Blue explains how patients can get more face-to-face time with their doctor through something called concierge medicine. Blue is a pioneer in concierge medicine and has been building private physician practices since 2002. He is also the executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, and is the co-founder and chief strategy officer of LeadHealth, which focuses on functional medicine to control health care costs and improve the lives of its members.

Digging into the hidden subconcious of the brain

Do you ever find yourself wondering why you do the things you do every day, or reach the decisions you make? Most of the time, small everyday tasks and decisions aren't given much thought by our conscious mind, but our unconscious mind may always be thinking about them. This week on "Take Care," Shankar Vedantam, a science correspondent for NPR who focuses on human behavior and social sciences, explains what he calls the hidden brain and his work on the topic. Vedantam is the host of the NPR podcast "The Hidden Brain," which has explored topics such as unbearable boredom, the art of forgery, and what drives romantic relationships besides love. He is also the author of the book, "The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives."

Concierge medicine: better service, but just for some?

One complaint about today's medical system is that treatment can seem impersonal. The idea of concierge medicine tries to combat this by charging a monthly fee to allow doctors to take fewer patients and provide more individual focus. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tom Blue, executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, about concierge or private medicine. More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Support for this story comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

New study one step closer to linking cell phone radiation and cancer

If you were asked what the best place for your cell phone is, you might say your pocket. But a recent study has shown keeping your cell phone on your person may be connected to certain types of cancer. This week on "Take Care," journalist Dina Fine Maron shares the findings of this study. Maron's article, "Major Cell Phone Radiation Study Reignites Cancer Questions," appeared in Scientific Americanin May 2016. Maron is an award winning journalist, the health and medicine editor for Scientific American, and is a contributor to the publication's podcasts and Instant Egghead video series.

How to make healthy life changes from tiny habits

When it comes to making a change in our life, such as reducing stress or losing weight, it can seem difficult. But if we broke it down into small steps that eventually turned that change into an everyday routine, it might not seem so scary. This week on "Take Care," Dr. B.J. Fogg tells us about this new theory he calls "Tiny Habits:" a model he's created for human behavior change, guided by research and design. Fogg is a psychologist and innovator who directs the persuasive tech lab at Stanford University, is the author of "Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do," and has been selected by Fortune Magazine as one of the "10 Gurus You Should Know."

How tiny habits can lead to lasting change

Change is hard. And if you're trying to make a healthy change — like losing weight or quitting smoking — the challenge may seem monumental. This week, WRVO's health and wellness show features an interview with B.J. Fogg, A Stanford University psychologist and innovator. He says the secret to lasting change is developing changes in your behavior, which he calls tiny habits. More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Support for this story comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

How a new website and mobile app could save you money on prescription drug costs

You care about your health, but it can be expensive. Between doctor's visits, co-pays, and prescription medication, the final bill can be more than you expect. But what if there was a way to make it cheaper? This week on "Take Care," Matthew Chaiken tells us about his new company Blink Health, and how they're able to cut out the middle man when it comes to buying prescription drugs at the pharmacy. Chaiken co-founded Blink Health with his brother Geoffrey in 2014, and they launched the company's website and mobile app this past February.

How a new website and mobile app could save you money on prescription drug costs

Mindful eating: Let your body tell you when you're full

You may feel you don't always eat because you're hungry, but to fulfill other emotions, such as boredom, stress, sadness or anger. Overeating can often be a result of mindless eating when we're feeling these emotions, according to this week's "Take Care" guest, Dr. Lynn Rossy. Rossy is the author of the book "The Mindfulness-Based Eating Solution:Proven Strategies to End Overeating, Satisfy Your Hunger, and Savor Your Life," and is a licensed clinical psychologist for the wellness program at the University of Missouri. She is also on the board of directors for the Center for Mindful Eating.

Being mindful of your eating

Sometimes physical hunger isn't the only reason we choose to eat. Mindless eating, a topic we explore this week on "Take Care," can bring comfort and mask other issues. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Lynn Rossy, a clinical psychologist at the University of Missouri's Wellness Program. Rossy helps people learn to check in with their bodies, recognize when they're full and avoid overeating. Hear more about mindful eating — the concept of being in tune with your body, eating habits and not going overboard — with Lynn Rossy on "Take Care" this weekend. Tune in tomorrow morning at 6:30 and Sunday evening at 6:30 on WRVO. Support for this story comes from The Health Foundation of Western and Central New York.

Some find art more theraputic than words

Even if your version of drawing is simple stick figures, you may find yourself feeling relaxed when you doodle on papers or color. Creating art has even been proven to have a therapeutic value in the medical world. The term art therapy was coined in the 1940s, and today is applied in a variety of settings to aid both children and adults in expressing and releasing trauma. This week on "Take Care," international art therapy expert, Cathy Malchiodi gives us an insight to art therapy and how it works. Malchiodi is a research psychologist, art therapist, and clinical counselor. She is also the founder and director of the Trauma-Informed Practices and Expressive Arts Therapy Institute, and is the president of Art Therapy Without Borders.

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