Take Care

Take Care

From WRVO

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.More from Take Care »

Most Recent Episodes

A closer look at smoking and its effects, in any form

Research shows that inhaling smoke from cigarettes increases your risk of lung cancer and other disease. But is it the carcinogens found in the tobacco or the smoke itself that causes the increase? Secondhand smoke, which has a different composition, is thought of as equally dangerous. And what about thirdhand smoke that lingers on fabrics and in homes? This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Norman Edelman about smoking and its effects. Edelman is a senior scientific advisor with the American Lung Association. You can hear more of this week's interview with Edelman on first, secondhand and even thirdhand smoke — and the latest research into the effects of marijuana cigarettes and vaporizing — tomorrow morning at 6:30 and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. on WRVO. Support for this story and "Take Care" comes from the Health Foundation of Western and Central New York.

Subtracting added sugar: Society's sweet addiction and how to fight it

It's common knowledge that eating sugar does no favors for a body. But is sugar having worse effects than just adding empty calories to our diets? Award winning investigative science journalist and cofounder of the Nutrition Science Initiative Gary Taubes discusses the detrimental effects that excessive sugar consumption has on people, and how "excessive" may be actually a lot lower than you might think. Taubes is the author of the new book, " The Case Against Sugar ."

Making a case against sugar

Scientific evidence continues to grow about the negative impacts of consuming sugar. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with investigative science journalist Gary Taubes. Taubes is the author of the new book "The Case against Sugar" and argues that sugar is as unhealthy as smoking.

Bedbugs and bacteria: What's lingering in your linens?

When someone checks into a hospital or hotel, the last thing on their mind is the sheets they're lying on. But those sheets have the potential to be deadly if they aren't properly washed between patients or guests. This week on Take Care, Dr. Philip Tierno , Clinical Professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Pathology at the NYU School of Medicine and author of " The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter " discusses what might be hiding out in the bedsheets of hospitals and hotels—and the impacts it could have on your health.

The word on cranberries for UTI treatment

For many a generation, mothers and grandmothers alike have sworn by cranberry juice as a suitable home remedy for urinary tract infections (UTIs). To understand the science behind this treatment option, Dr. Rose Khavari , assistant professor of urology at the Institute for Academic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital, joined "Take Care" for a conversation on UTIs and the effectiveness of cranberry juice and cranberry supplements.

Alternative therapies — safe and effective?

Everyone wants to feel their best, but with so many products on the health market, it can be difficult to know which are truly effective. Today, many medical consumers are turning to alternative medicines and therapies in an effort to increase their overall health and well-being. So which ones are safe, and which actually work? To find out, "Take Care" spoke with Dr. Josephine Briggs , director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. A Harvard and Yale-trained physician, Briggs researches and reports on various therapies to provide the public with the information necessary to decide whether a certain practice is beneficial.

Getting your calcium – dairy vs. dietary supplements

Calcium is essential for healthy bones, but could getting it from supplements be doing more harm than good? This week on "Take Care," Dr. Taylor Wallace , affiliate professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University and former senior director of science, policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation, discusses the effects that taking calcium supplements could have on cardiovascular health.

Calcium supplement controversy

Many people try to increase their consumption of calcium to help prevent osteoperosis. But there has been some research that indicates that calcium supplements could increase the risk of heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Taylor Wallace, a professor in nutrition and food studies at George Mason University, about the controversy over calcium supplements. Wallace is also the former senior director of science policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation. More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Support for this story comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Complementary & alternative therapies — concerns & potential

More and more Americans are seeking non-traditional therapies to find relief from symptoms and pain and to maintain overall health. But if you're a medical consumer interested in complementary or integrative treatments, how do you know what's safe and what's effective? One reliable source is the National Institutes of Health. This week on "Take Care," Dr. Josephine Briggs , director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at NIH gives an overview of these kinds of therapies – and what to look out for. A Harvard- and Yale-trained physician, Briggs is recognized internationally for her research accomplishments. The center she heads investigates and researches these therapies and informs the general public of their findings.

Hotels for hospital patients

Would you prefer to stay in a hospital or a hotel? If you're in need of medical treatment, you may now have the option to choose. This week on "Take Care," The New York Times reporter C.J. Hughes discusses the rise of hospital-hotel rooms and "medical tourism," a trend he covered in his article "Trading Hospital Rooms for Hotel Suites."

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