Inside Appalachia

Inside Appalachia

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.More from Inside Appalachia »

Most Recent Episodes

Documentary Explores Economic Future of Appalachia, Through the Words of Novelist Mary Lee Settle

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of a series of novels called The Beulah Quintet. The novels are by the late Mary Lee Settle, a writer who set out to capture moments in West Virginia history when a revolutionary change was at stake. Today's economic uncertainty here in Appalachia has many people wondering whether we are also living in the midst of a transition.

Documentary Explores Economic Future of Appalachia, Through the Words of Novelist Mary Lee Settle

In the Face of Tough Realities, 5 Stories of Appalachian Victories

As the coal industry in Appalachia continues to decline, more and more families are struggling. Poor job prospects throughout the region are causing a lot of anxiety in families. And mental health expects say that kind of stress can accumulatively lead to mental illness. What can parents do to help their children cope with stress?

Inside Appalachia: What Does It Take To Rebuild After a Flood?

After floods ravaged central and southern West Virginia on June 23rd, some residents are wondering how can we rebuild? And can communities bounce back- after a devastating disaster?

Can We Rebuild? Many Flood Survivors Grappling With a Long Recovery

On Thursday June 23, massive flooding swept across most of West Virginia. It began with a rare event- a tornado touched down in Nicholas County, West Virginia on the afternoon of Tuesday, June 21. Regional rain storms followed but nothing like what started to fall throughout a 22-county region on Thursday, June 23.

Inside the 'Brotherhood' of Coal Mining

As coal jobs continue to disappear in Appalachia, some families are holding tight to the idea that coal will come back. Surprisingly, it's not the pay that they miss about the work but the bond that comes with working in the mines. They often call it a 'brotherhood.'

Appalachian Ciphers: Hip Hop in the Hills

When you think of Appalachia, hip hop isn't often the first thing that comes to mind. But because of the hard work of several generations of Appalachians, there is a growing hip hop scene here in these hills, complete with music festivals, political action, and youth development programs.

Musical Heart Work: Retooling Appalachian Tradition

This week on Inside Appalachia, we're taking a look at Appalachians of all stripes who are retooling tradition to create a brighter future. We'll hear from a family of guitar makers in Virginia, members of Davis and Elkins College's first graduating class of its Appalachian Ensemble, an enterprising young reporter who's working to amplify #WVMusic, one of the few piano tuners in West Virginia, and a group of folks from Letcher County, Kentucky who are bringing square dancing back into vogue.

Inside Appalachia: It's All Gravy, Baby

Biscuits, gravy, pepperoni rolls, fried chicken, and... salt? This week on Inside Appalachia, we're investigating the history and stories of some of Appalachia's most famous foods with the help of Gravy, a podcast produced by the Southern Foodways Alliance. We'll hear about the revitalization of West Virginia's salt production industry, the complicated history of fried chicken, and the growing popularity of Appalachian food in major urban centers.

The View From Appalachia: What Issues are Most Important to Voters in Appalachia?

It's election season and we want to know what Appalachians are looking for in a new president. We'll hear from a former coal miner from Whitesburg, Ky, Gary Bentley. We'll also hear from a veteran who lives in Bristol, Va., Ralph Slaughter.

The View From Appalachia: What Issues are Most Important to Voters in Appalachia?

Inside Appalachia for 2016-05-20

You might have heard of this radio show called Mountain Stage. The show, produced by folks right here in Appalachia, has been featuring artists from across the world for more than 30 years. Mountain Stage is one of the longest running live music performance shows on public radio. It began in 1983 and has featured nearly 2,000 acts from more than 50 countries--and nearly every conceivable genre--for a catalogue of 871 shows (and counting).

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