University Of The Air

University Of The Air

From Wisconsin Public Radio

On "University Of The Air," hosts Norman Gilliland and Emily Auerbach draw on the knowledge of faculty from Wisconsin universities, visiting professors and artists for conversations about a broad range of topics of enduring interest.More from University Of The Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Seeing Blackness

How do depictions of Serena Williams, Diana Ross, Trayvon Martin, and other African Americans reflect and influence our attitudes toward race? Three scholar-artist-activists (Herman Gray of UCSC, Nicole Fleetwood of Rutgers University, and Jay Katalansky of UW Madison) discuss representations of black athletes, entertainers, victims, and celebrities.

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Homer

They were written almost 2,800 years ago, but The Iliad and The Odyssey are still some of the best-known works of epic poetry. But how much do we know about their author and origin? William Brockliss, Professor of Classics at UW-Madison, discusses the man behind these two tales.

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What Is Privacy, and Why Does It Matter?

Alan Rubel, Professor in the School of Library and Information Studies, explains the various definitions of privacy and the importance of the right to privacy in this Information Age.

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Torture and Impunity

The detention facilities of Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo have taken on dark associations. Historian Alfred McCoy explains the repercussions of torture, not just for the person experiencing it, but also for the the government applying it.

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Poverty and Child Mistreatment

Establishing the causal roles of child mistreatment remains a difficult task for researchers. Lawrence Berger, Professor of Social Work and Director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at UW-Madison, explains his research exploring the link between child maltreatment and socioeconomic factors.

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The Origins of Music

What is the biological imperative that makes us enjoy music? How is it that just the right collection of sounds can induce such powerful emotional states? And is that experience of music also experienced by other animals? UW-Madison Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Zoology, Charles Snowden, explains the evolutionary origins of music, and its possible functions for humans, and animals, alike.

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The Three Crises of Elizabeth I

As a young woman, Elizabeth became the ruler of the most powerful country on earth, but during her long rein she had to come to terms with three major crises. What were they, and how did she handle them? Margaret George, author of the novel "Elizabeth I," tells us.

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Trevor Stephenson

Trevor Stephenson and the Madison Bach Musicians perform Baroque holiday favorites.

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Beyond the Ties of Blood

Florencia Mallon takes us to Chile during the turbulent 1970s with a look at her new novel "Beyond the Ties of Blood."

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Bottoms Up — A Guide to Wisconsin's Taverns

Wisconsin taverns tell us a lot about our past and how we live today. The authors of "Bottoms Up" take us on a survey of the state's bars, past and present.

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