University Of The Air On "University Of The Air," hosts Norman Gilliland and Emily Auerbach draw on the knowledge of faculty from Wisconsin universities, visiting professors and artists for conversations about a broad range of topics of enduring interest.
University Of The Air

University Of The Air

From Wisconsin Public Radio

On "University Of The Air," hosts Norman Gilliland and Emily Auerbach draw on the knowledge of faculty from Wisconsin universities, visiting professors and artists for conversations about a broad range of topics of enduring interest.More from University Of The Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Restorative Justice in Wisconsin's Prisons

Restorative justice seeks to heal the harm done to victims and to help offenders take responsibility for their actions in a transformative way that benefits the community. Three guests explore how they are using this approach in Wisconsin prisons: the Reverend Jerry Hancock, former Deputy District Attorney and now Director of the Prison Ministry Project; Jerome Dillard, former incarcerated individual who has spent decades working to help prisoners successfully reenter society; and former WPR distinguished broadcaster and host Jean Feraca, who has in her retirement passionately embraced Restorative Justice as a volunteer.

Restorative Justice in Wisconsin's Prisons

A Native American Cultural Landscape Tour - with Aaron Bird Bear and Daniel Einstein

Landmarks mean different things to different people and that includes statues and buildings that we see—or overlook—every day here in Wisconsin. Aaron Bird Bear and Daniel Einstein will explore the revolving relationship between Indians and non-Indians in the development of campus buildings and landmarks over time. We'll look at Indigenous landmarks created between 700 and 2500 years ago and interpreted their significance which will give us an overview of American Indian history and provide some insights into modern Indigenous nations and peoples.

A Native American Cultural Landscape Tour - with Aaron Bird Bear and Daniel Einstein

A Conversation with the Chancellor

What is it like to oversee Wisconsin's largest and highest ranking university, with over 43,000 students, billions of dollars in research funding, and the "Wisconsin Idea" of serving the state? In this hour, Chancellor Rebecca Blank discusses the pleasures and challenges of her role as UW Chancellor.

Braving It in the Alaskan Wild

James Campbell and his daughter Aidan discuss their journey through the Alaskan wilderness.

Why Teach the Holocaust Today?

Schindler's List, Life is Beautiful, The Diary of Anne Frank, and the operetta Brundibar bring the Holocaust into popular culture, but what do we discover if we scratch beneath the surface of these commercial successes? Rachel Brenner (middle above) and Teryl Dobbs (right above), along with student Jessica Kasinski (left above), explore the relevance of teaching the Holocaust today.

Hip Hop/Hip Hope in the Classroom

African American children fail and drop out of school at an alarmingly high rate, but providing them with skilled teachers who bring African American culture into the classroom can reverse that trend. Gloria Ladson-Billings, an internationally acclaimed scholar of education credited with the concept of "culturally relevant pedagogy," discusses hip hop as a transformative educational tool.

Reversing the Symptoms of Alzheimer's

In the United States more than five million people suffer from Alzheimer's disease at an estimated annual cost of $200 billion, and, if unchecked, the disease has the potential to bankrupt Medicare. The high prevalence of Alzheimer's is of particular concern because of the lack of success in developing effective therapeutics to fight it. Neurologist Dale Bredesen will detail his success with arresting and in some cases reversing the effects of Alzheimer's disease. He'll give us some insights into what the disease is and tell us how lifestyle changes can go a long way toward preventing it.

Overcoming Barriers to Children's Language Learning

How can parents and teachers empower children from low-income backgrounds as well as children with Down Syndrome, autism, and other differences to overcome barriers to learning to communicate? Professor Emerita Peggy Rosin discusses her lifetime career of developing strategies to help children gain the power to use language.

Overcoming Barriers to Children's Language Learning

The Occupation of Japan

At the end of World War II, a variety of political and civic virtues helped make it possible for the United States to move decisively in just a few years to turn a defeated Japan into a self-sufficient country compatible with American interests. How much did Japanese civilians know about the outcome of the war and how did the Japanese receive the American occupation forces? And what did they think of the man in charge of the occupation—General Douglas MacArthur? Look at the occupation of Japan from the viewpoint of someone who experienced it firsthand.

Bias in the Workplace

Eve Fine implements and conducts research on interventions and educational modules designed to increase the diversity of faculty and leaders in academic Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine. She and Jennifer Sheridan of the Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute discuss their findings regarding bias in the workplace.

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