University Of The Air

University Of The Air

From Wisconsin Public Radio

On "University Of The Air," hosts Norman Gilliland and Emily Auerbach draw on the knowledge of faculty from Wisconsin universities, visiting professors and artists for conversations about a broad range of topics of enduring interest.More from University Of The Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Wisconsin's Politics of Resentment

Wisconsin is a "purple state" that has elected both Republican and Democratic officials and battled over a gubernatorial recall. In this hour, political scientist Katherine Cramer explores the split between rural and urban areas of the state, drawing on the field research she covers in her new book, The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker.

Psychopaths

Psychologist Joseph Newman and neuroscientist Mike Koenings share some of their considerable research into the phenomenon of psychopathy, also known as antisocial personality disorder.

Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath became one of the America's foremost poets, novelists, and short story authors of the 20th century, and her formative but turbulent relationship with British poet Ted Hughes led her to create a confessional genre of poetry and her semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar.

Whatever Happened to Good and Evil?

As world cultures blend, how do we determine what's good, and what's evil? Our guest, professor of Philosophy Russ Shafer-Landau, tells us that some absolutes remain.

Hamilton, The Musical

Alexander Shashko, Joshua Calhoun, and Sarah Marty discuss Hamilton, The Musical. For further information: Sarah's upcoming class: http://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/classes/ hamilton-american-musical Interactive primer on the use of sound-patterns in Hamilton: http://graphics.wsj.com/hamilton/ Information on the "Shakespeare & Media" course Joshua will be co-teaching with Jonathan Senchyne (SLIS) this fall: http://www.shakesconsin.com Holding History where you can learn more about opportunities to physically interact with historical books and pamphlets: www.holdinghistory.com NPR "American Lives" story about James Baldwin that includes the text of his essay "Why I Stopped Hating Shakespeare": http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129281259

Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction

Historian Erika Janik, author of Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction, traces the exploits of real and imaginary female police officers and detectives in the burgeoning metropolises of America and England.

The Scandinavian-Celtic Connection in the Viking Age

During the Viking raids in Great Britain, the flow of goods was mostly one-way and involutnary, but the eschange of cultures was inevitible and long-lasting. Scandinavian Studies professor and folklorist Tom DuBois describes how the collision between Scandinavians and Celts shaped the Anglo-American culture of today.

The Scandinavian-Celtic Connection in the Viking Age

Clarence Darrow

The Scopes trial, the Leopold and Loeb murder trial, Clarnece Darrow was involved with some of the most famous legal cases in American history. What did he stand for and how was he able to become one of the msot prominent lawyers of the 20th century? Attorney Dean A. Strang will examine the life and trials of Clarence Darrow during this hour of University of the Air.

Inequities in Women's Health

How does the exclusion of women from clinical studies threaten their lives? Why is the mortality rate three times higher for African American mothers and infants than for the general population? In this hour, Drs. Gloria Sarto and Cynthia Anderson explore inequities in women's health here at home and around the world.

Miracles — or Not?

We often say that something like winning the lottery is a miracle, when we really mean that it has a low, but actual, probability of occurring to us. But in 1748, philosopher David Hume argued against the existence of true miracles — events which could only be explained by defying the physical laws of nature. The question might seem settled, but in fact the debate surrounding miracles is a subject of contemporary philosophical research. Here, UW Professor of Philosophy Larry Shapiro asks whether it is possible to rationally believe in true miracles.

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