Money Talking New Yorkers crave informed and intelligent business and economic news. WNYC's Money Talking brings you just that with lively conversations that go beyond the headlines and the jargon to explore the most important business stories of the week. Every Friday join Jeff Greenfield as he hosts regular WNYC contributors Joe Nocera (The New York Times) and Rana Foroohar (Time). Context, conversation and insight. That's WNYC's Money Talking.
Money Talking

Money Talking

From WNYC Radio

New Yorkers crave informed and intelligent business and economic news. WNYC's Money Talking brings you just that with lively conversations that go beyond the headlines and the jargon to explore the most important business stories of the week. Every Friday join Jeff Greenfield as he hosts regular WNYC contributors Joe Nocera (The New York Times) and Rana Foroohar (Time). Context, conversation and insight. That's WNYC's Money Talking.More from Money Talking »

Most Recent Episodes

Big Business Walks Away from the President — Sort of

This week, several top execs decided to distance themselves from the White House following the president's response to violence in Charlottesville. Shortly after, President Donald Trump disbanded two groups of business leaders put together to advise him on manufacturing and policy. But while big business may seem to be walking away from Trump, the administration is still full of former financiers — and promises to loosen regulations will most likely benefit big corporations. This week on Money Talking, Jennifer Kaplan of Bloomberg News and Aaron Elstein of Crain's New York Business discuss with Ilya Marritz where the relationship between corporations and the Trump Administration stands.

Student Debt: Paralyzing Lives One Student at a Time

This month, students all across the U.S. are getting ready to head off to college. For many of them, preparing for school involves taking on thousands of dollars in student loans that could impact their lives for years to come. Student debt totaled $1.3 trillion at the end of 2016, more than double what it was 10 years ago. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that mounting debt could ultimately hurt consumer spending and the upward mobility of low income students. Long after they've taken out student loans, Americans are being forced to choose between paying off debt and getting married, having children, saving for emergencies and purchasing homes. This week on Money Talking, Charlie Herman talks with Anna Sale of WNYC's Death, Sex & Money about her project, "Our Student Loan Secrets" and NPR Education Correspondent Anya Kamenetz about the long-term effects of rising student debt on both individuals and the U.S. economy. Student loan debt. (fred.stlouisfed.org/Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

What's Next for Trump and Congress

After the failure by Republicans to replace or repeal Obamacare, they're moving quickly to score a political win, and they're focusing on overhauling the nation's tax code by November. There's a lot do in a little amount of time, and even Trump's legislative director has admitted it's an aggressive schedule. But that is just one of many items on Congress' to do list that includes must several must-pass pieces of legislation like funding the government and raising the debt ceiling. This week on Money Talking, host Charlie Herman reviews what's head and what's at stake with Catherine Rampell, opinion writer with the Washington Post, and Rick Newman, columnist with Yahoo Finance.

Follow the (Russian) Money

With each day, there are more Congressional hearings and more details about the investigations into Russia's interference in the U.S. presidential elections. This week on Money Talking, Charlie Herman talks with Seva Gunitsky, associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto and author of Aftershocks, and with WNYC's Andrea Bernstein, senior editor for politics & policy, about the financial and economic motives that could be behind Russia's intentions in the U.S.

Ivanka Trump: Made in Asia

President Trump is seeking to fulfill the "America First" theme of his administration by launching "Made in America" week. Starting on Monday, the White House featured companies and workers making products here at home. The goal is to bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States. But Trump's pledge is inconsistent with his family's own business practices as many Trump products are made overseas, including the clothing line created by his daughter — and White House adviser — Ivanka Trump. "Her clothes, handbags, and shoes are all made exclusively in foreign factories in Asia right now by low-wage workers who have a limited ability to advocate for themselves," said Matea Gold, a reporter with the Washington Post who wrote about the business practices of Ivanka Trump's company. "As an apparel brand, as much as they would like to produce here in the United States, it's incredibly difficult to do so on a large-scale fashion," she said. "The reality and nuances of this debate conflict, I think, with some of [Trump's] broader rhetoric about this." This week on Money Talking, Charlie Herman talks with Matea Gold about what it would take for Trump to bring manufacturing jobs back to the U.S. by looking at his daughter's clothing company.

Martin 'Pharma Bro' Shkreli On Trial

Martin Shkreli is often described as the "most hated man in America" for raising the price of a lifesaving drug by 5,000%, earning him the nickname "Pharma bro." Shkreli said his pharmaceutical company raised the price of Daraprim from $13.50 a pill to $750 in order to spend that money on research for an alternative drug, a claim which medical experts widely derided. Now, Shkreli is back in the news and on trial for securities fraud, and while others in his situation might sit quietly and await the verdict, that's not what Shkreli is doing. He can't help himself from making even more attention grabbing headlines. This week on Money Talking, Host Charlie Herman talks with Renae Merle, a Wall Street and white collar crime reporter for the Washington Post, and Sheelah Kolhatkar, staff writer for the The New Yorker and author of Black Edge: Inside Information, Dirty Money, and the Quest to Bring Down the Most Wanted Man on Wall Street about Shkreli's case and what it could say about the prosecution of white collar crimes.

Trump Tariffs and Trade Wars

President Donald Trump has made it clear that he disagrees with many global trade deals. He withdrew from the Trans Pacific Partnership almost as soon as he took office. He has repeatedly criticized and is now looking to withdraw or renegotiate NAFTA — the North American Free Trade Alliance. Trump argues that global trade deals hurt the U.S. economy and its workers. This week, as he sits down with global leaders at the G20 summit in Germany, he's also reportedly considering putting a tariff on steel imported to the U.S. These tariffs might also grow to include other imports, like aluminum and paper. But in doing so, Trump could end up setting off a global trade war. Other countries might retaliate with their own tariffs on products coming from the United States. This week on Money Talking, Host Charlie Herman talks with Rana Foroohar with the Financial Times and Rick Newman with Yahoo Finance about the unintended consequences of steel tariffs and the trickle-down effect on consumers.

For Now, Obamacare Is Here to Stay

Republicans are united in their opposition to Obamacare, yet they're finding it difficult to repeal and replace the law as they promised to do. This week, the Senate delayed a vote on the bill after Majority Leader Mitch McConnell realized he didn't have the support he needed to pass it. The delay came after negative reviews (many of which came from Republicans themselves) and dismal polling. So now, the political horse trading to get more votes is underway, and if Republicans fail to pass their version, Obamacare will continue to be the law of the land. This week on Money Talking, Host Charlie Herman talks with Tami Luhby of CNNMoney and Jonathan Cohn of The Huffington Post about the state of healthcare today and whether or not Obamacare is "failing."

The Bumpy Road Ahead for Uber

This week, one tumultuous Uber ride came to an end, with the resignation of CEO Travis Kalanick. Just last week, Kalanick announced he was taking an indefinite leave of absence, but investors had had enough, and forced him to step down. It's the latest development after years of negative stories about the company's corporate culture and business practices. Now, questions turn to what's next for the ride-hailing app that had dreams of changing the face of transportation. This week on Money Talking, Host Charlie Herman talks with Sheelah Kolhatkar with The New Yorker and Reeves Wiedeman with New York Magazine about the future of Uber and what it says about Silicon Valley.

Rolling Back Bank Regulations

The Trump administration is proposing to revise and change banking regulations that were put in place after the financial crisis. On Monday, the Treasury Department released a report outlining it's plans to do so. This comes after House Republicans last week passed a bill — the Financial CHOICE Act — that would roll back regulations even further. The bill, which was introduced by the Representative Jeb Hensarling of Texas, would weaken the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Financial Stability Oversight Council and gut the Dodd-Frank financial reform law passed in the aftermath of the financial crash. The bill is headed to the Senate for consideration. This week on Money Talking, host Charlie Herman talks with Rana Foroohar from the Financial Times and Sheelah Kolhatkar from the New Yorker about the President's plans and the House bill, and what these changes could mean for the economy and consumers' pocketbooks?

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