Around and About Chattanooga

Around and About Chattanooga

From WUTC

Originating as a Chattanooga, Tennessee public radio show, Around and About features news, interviews, author chats and arts coverage. In particular, the show covers human-interest stories, Southern literature and discussion of current events. Some guests are Chattanooga residents; others are national authors, experts and celebrities. The show is broadcast regularly on WUTC NPR 88.1 FM, and more information is at www.wutc.org.More from Around and About Chattanooga »

Most Recent Episodes

Houston Museum's Annual Antique Fair Starts 2/24

Anna Saffley Houston led a rich life. She was an independent woman in an era when very few women had that option. But she's best remembered for the huge collection of antiques she amassed in her lifetime--now housed in The Houston Museum in the Bluff View Arts District. Richard Winham talked to Lilly Waters, the outreach coordinator for the museum, about the collection and the life of the singular woman behind it. The museum's annual antiques show/sale runs 2/24 through 2/26.

Chattanooga Refugee Stories & A Reverse Migration in 'Immigration Essays'

In 2013, Sybil Baker began working on a book about immigrants and refugees who have resettled in Chattanooga, Tennessee. At the request of people who reviewed early drafts, she began including stories of her own travels, including a "reverse migration" from America to Ankara, and 12 years she spent living in South Korea before moving to the Scenic City and teaching at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She joins us to talk about Immigration Essays , which also examines Chattanooga as a destination: its legacy of racism, and gentrification affecting the MLK neighborhood downtown. SPECIAL EVENT: At Star Line Books on 2/15 at 7 pm, she will be celebrating her book launch with special guests George Conley and Earl Braggs.

Chattanooga Refugee Stories & A Reverse Migration in 'Immigration Essays'

The Choo Choo Chorus Sings for Sweethearts on Valentine's Day

The Chattanooga Chorus is a group of men who love to sing acapella barbershop harmony. Every year on Valentines Day, The Choo Choo Chorus dispatches quartets all over the city to serenade sweethearts. As you might imagine the singers have stories to tell—they shared a few with Richard Winham.

75 Years Ago, 'Chattanooga Choo Choo' Became the World's First Gold Record

Glenn Miller's "Chattanooga Choo Choo" was such a phenomenal hit that RCA honored Miller with a novel trophy: a copy of the record pressed in gold on February 10, 1942. The song boosted tourism in Chattanooga, Tennessee, inspiring local businessmen to save a historic train station from demolition and refurbish it. By 1942, more than 1.2 million copies of the song had been sold. And that was no small thing--the biggest seller in years. RCA manager W. Wallace Early celebrated by presenting Glenn Miller with a trophy during a live radio broadcast. "The best one we could think of was a gold record of Chattanooga," Early said. "And now, Glenn, it's yours, with the best wishes of RCA Victor Bluebird Records." Announcer Paul Douglas made sure people tuning in could imagine what it looked like, saying "I think everyone listening in on the radio should know, Glenn, it actually is a recording of 'Chattanooga Choo Choo,' but it's in gold, solid gold, and is really fine." Miller responded with a

75 Years Ago, 'Chattanooga Choo Choo' Became the World's First Gold Record

Eccentrics Abound in Tuna, Texas at The Signal Mountain Playhouse This Month

Greater Tuna, the second smallest town in Texas, is the setting for the play opening at the Signal Mountain Playhouse on Friday February 11 th . The play features twenty different characters , but only two actors. Richard Winham talked to the actors, Mark Oglesby and Dennis Parker, along with the play's director, Michelle Ford.

Eccentrics Abound in Tuna, Texas at The Signal Mountain Playhouse This Month

Chattanooga Refugee Supporters Chant 'We All Belong' at Candlelight Vigil

Candles lit up Coolidge Park Wednesday evening when an estimated 1,200 Chattanoogans attended a vigil for refugees banned by President Trump's immigration order. They chanted in unison with speakers that represented various immigrant, refugee, and religious groups. "We all belong here," they said "Let them stay." The executive order has halted refugees and citizens from 7 majority Muslim countries for up to 4 months. Syrians have been banned from coming altogether. Mr. Trump said the ban is to prevent terrorist attacks. Vigil organizers disagree that the ban will keep American safe. Marina Peshterianu, Associate Director of Bridge Refugee Services, said the ban has caused fear and confusion. "It affected all the refugees that were in transit to our community. There were 20 people who already had their tickets. Seven families, half of them children. All of these people were coming from different countries but were affected by one stroke of the pen." Bridge Refugee Services Inc., helps

Chattanooga Refugee Supporters Chant 'We All Belong' at Candlelight Vigil

Hutton and Smith Hopes to Become Chattanooga's Biggest Independent Brewery

Joel and Melanie Krautstrunk moved to Chattanooga three years ago planning to open a micro-brewery and a taproom. By the end of this year they hope to be running Chattanooga's largest independent brewery. Richard Winham talked to Joel Krautstrunk about his passion for beer and how he and his wife have managed to go from a micro-brewery to a macro brewery in such a short time.

Hutton and Smith Hopes to Become Chattanooga's Biggest Independent Brewery

Tennessee Governor Touts Gas Tax Hike, Free Community College for Adults in State of State Address

If Tennessee legislators say yes to everything Governor Bill Haslam touted Monday evening, you'll pay more while driving to the grocery store, but you'll save while shopping. And if you've never earned a college degree, you could get one tuition-free. During his seventh State of the State Address in Nashville, Gov. Haslam proposed Tennessee become the first state to offer tuition-free community college for all adult residents. (High school students are already eligible under the Tennessee Promise program. Right now, only some adults are eligible to attend certain schools without paying tuition or fees.) The Tennessee Reconnect Act would give more adults a chance at higher education. Any of the state's 13 public community colleges would be available to residents who meet certain eligibility requirements: Not already have an associate or bachelor degree; Have been a Tennessee resident for at least one year preceding the date of application for the grant; Complete the FAFSA and be deemed

Tennessee Governor Touts Gas Tax Hike, Free Community College for Adults in State of State Address

She Gave Away The Founder's Fortune: An Actual True Story

Practically on a whim, Joan Kroc made the biggest public radio pledge in history: around $250 million dollars to NPR. She could afford it. Her husband was McDonald's corporation founder Ray Kroc, and Ray and Joan were worth billions. Ray's life was well-publicized, most recently in the Michael Keaton film The Founder. That film is based on a true story. A new book from journalist Lisa Napoli might serve as a companion piece to the film, because the book is a true story, a meticulously-researched biography exploring Ray and Joan's tumultuous relationship and her unpredictable, idiosyncratic generosity. Lisa Napoli joins us to talk about Ray & Joan: The Man Who Made The McDonald's Fortune And The Woman Who Gave It All Away. It's very possible that Joan would have disapproved of Ray & Joan being written and published, because she sometimes avoided the limelight. Napoli spent five years tracking down information to finally tell Joan's story.

Chattanooga Women's March Organizer: Turnout Was 'Beyond My Wildest Dreams'

The day after the Presidential inauguration, protesters flooded the streets in Washington, D.C. and all over the globe. It was a movement originally planned as an anti-Trump protest--but quickly morphed into a march for women's rights. Chattanooga organizers sent a bus full of protesters to D.C., but here in the Scenic City, thousands more local residents met downtown for a rally and march. The scope of it surprised everyone--organizers, participants, and city officials. The march in Chattanooga was a sister rally to the marches in Washington, D.C. and other marches that were held all over the globe in solidarity for human rights. The rally took place in Coolidge Park and had a variety of speakers who represented different communities in Chattanooga including individuals with disabilities, Native Americans, Latinos, LGBTQ, and African-Americans. Ash-Lee Henderson of Concerned Citizens for Justice led the crown in chanting, "Educate, agitate, organize!" Sherri Nakamoto, an original

Chattanooga Women's March Organizer: Turnout Was 'Beyond My Wildest Dreams'

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