World Views from KGOU

World Views from KGOU

From KGOU

Produced by KGOU and the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, World Views provides interviews and analysis of global events.More from World Views from KGOU »

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World Views: July 29, 2016

Anthropologist Noah Theriault contributes to the blog Inhabiting the Anthropocene, which examines how humans have influenced climate and the environment. He'll discuss this proposed geological epoch with Suzette Grillot. But first, we check in with Rebecca Cruise, who's in Germany. The country recently saw four violent attacks in less than a week.

'Anthropocene' Debate Tries To Pin Down When Humans Started Affecting Climate, Geology

No matter where you land on the climate change discussion, humans have become a geophysical force that impacts everything from local ecosystems to the atmosphere itself. "Humans are having, for a single species, pretty much unprecedented effect on their entire biosphere, such that it could possibly be recorded permanently in the geological record," University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault argues. "If an extraterrestrial species came down and studied our planet sometime in the distant future, they would be able to tell there was some big change right around what we would consider to be the geological present." But what do you call that?

'Anthropocene' Debate Tries To Pin Down When Humans Started Affecting Climate, Geology

Landis: Last Week's Failed Coup Could Undermine U.S.-Turkey Relations

A week after the beginning of a failed coup in Turkey, there are still so many unanswered questions about who was behind it and what's next for the country that's long walked a tightrope between religion and secularism. More than 250 people died in the July 15 uprising, mostly government supporters standing up to the attempt. Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, told KGOU's World Views 60,000 residents have been fired, arrested, or pushed out of their jobs. "There has been a long slate of public enemies of the [President Recep Tayyip] Erdoğan regime that have been pushed out," Landis said. "And this isn't people who are connected to the coup, this is a very opportunistic sweep." Erdoğan has blamed the coup on followers of Fethullah Gülen, a Turkish religious leader who's been living in self-imposed exile in the United States since the 1990s. Gülen has denied involvement and denounced the uprising. But because the Pennsylvania

Landis: Last Week's Failed Coup Could Undermine U.S.-Turkey Relations

World Views: July 22, 2016

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss last weekend's failed coup attempt in Turkey. Hundreds of people died during the uprising, and tens of thousands were arrested during this week's crackdown. Then we'll hear a conversation with World Neighbors' Southeast Asia representative Edd Wright. Ever since the 2004 tsunami, he's been trying to make sure Indonesia is prepared for another catastrophe.

World Neighbors' Edd Wright Works To Mitigate Southeast Asia's Next Disaster

The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami killed more than 200,000 people and led to billions in aid distribution throughout the region. Edd Wright, the Southeast Asia representative for the Oklahoma City-based international development organization World Neighbors, works on what he calls disaster risk reduction in Indonesia. His group starts by working with governments to identify which villages are most at-risk from disaster, which is followed by a need-based assessment (the communities don't have to participate). From there, they start to categorize what types of disasters the community has faced.

World Neighbors' Edd Wright Works To Mitigate Southeast Asia's Next Disaster

Domestic And International Activists Reflect On Their Causes, Inspiration

From South Africa, to Palestine, to Haiti, to a small college town in the middle of the United States, you'll find injustice everywhere. Clemson University women's leadership lecturer Saadiqa Lundy has created empowerment and development programs in Africa and the Caribbean, But when Lundy met her husband Chenjerai Kumanyika, she became more of an activist and a protester. She says teaching a subject like that is completely different than actually being there. "I had a lot of fear, initially, that I had to overcome," Lundy told KGOU's World Views. "So I've grown a lot throughout the process. I'm still growing and trying to figure out my role in this space." Kumanyika grew up around activism. His father was a civil rights activist who led the Bronx chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and his mother works in public health with a focus on racial disparities. He says the type of poverty and debt that contribute to racial tension in the U.S. are actually issues everywhere.

Domestic And International Activists Reflect On Their Causes, Inspiration

World Views: July 8, 2016

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. He'll talk with Suzette Grillot about what it would take for a new generation of intergovernmental organization like what happened after World War II. But first, she'll be joined by University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith to talk about what's next for the United Kingdom and the European Union two weeks after the "Brexit" vote.

Uncertainty, Unhappiness 2 Weeks After 'Brexit' Vote To Leave European Union

Two weeks after a majority of British voters declared they wanted to leave the European Union, there's still a tremendous amount of uncertainty about how exactly that's going to happen. "I've not heard anybody on this side of the [English] Channel who has said positive things about the British vote," said Mitchell Smith, a political economist and the director of the University of Oklahoma's European Union Center. He's a frequent contributor to KGOU's World Views and has been traveling with students in Brussels, the de facto capital of the EU. The "Brexit" vote still dominates the conversation and news coverage in the UK. The country is still incredibly divided, even though the vote is a done deal. But there's very little disparity in Continental Europe, and Smith says most of the people he's talked to are upset, depressed, and concerned about the future. But the EU institutions – the European Commission, the Council, and the Parliament –didn't expect the "Leave" campaign to triumph,

Uncertainty, Unhappiness 2 Weeks After 'Brexit' Vote To Leave European Union

Political Scientist Thomas Weiss Wonders If New Conflict Would Make Global Governance Effective

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. "Whether it's climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems," Weiss told KGOU's World Views. The City University of New York professor's 2014 book Governing The World? explores what former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan described as "problems without passports" during a 2003 address to African-American civil society leaders. Dealing with these types of issues was a founding principle of the UN in 1945, but Weiss says the pendulum has swung too far away from state responsibility toward non-governmental organizations and an entire array of complex stakeholders. "We're applauding very loudly because Human Rights Watch screams about human rights, or that some deals are cut by Nike to make the

Political Scientist Thomas Weiss Wonders If New Conflict Would Make Global Governance Effective

World Views: July 1, 2016

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the terrorist attack in Istanbul, and some of the security issues these types of attacks continue. Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert He and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. Many were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

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