World Views from KGOU

World Views from KGOU

From KGOU

Produced by KGOU and the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, World Views provides interviews and analysis of global events.More from World Views from KGOU »

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World Views: August 26, 2016

Suzette Grillot checks in with Erika Larkins. She just returned from a year-long assignment in Brazil, and she'll offer her takeaways from the 2016 Summer Olympic games, which wrapped up Sunday. But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join the program to discuss Turkey's recent military moves in Syria, and North Korea's testing of a submarine-launched missile.

Anthropologist Erika Larkins Recaps The Challenges, Criticism, And Success Of The 2016 Rio Olympics

In the years since its selection as the site of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has drawn strong opinions both domestically and abroad about the sustainability and feasibility of the global sporting event. Despite security concerns and health issues - and even a fabricated robbery by American swimmer Ryan Lochte that generated international headlines - University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Larkins says the games went off without a hitch. "A lot of people were complaining that the services weren't as good as they were in London and that they paid a lot of money for tickets, and in some cases the venues ran out of food. You couldn't even get a bag of popcorn without standing in line for an hour," Larkins said. "But maybe that kind of stuff doesn't really matter. I think this is maybe where Rio has a gold medal. Maybe the Olympics, are really about sports, and about people coming together." Many U.S. athletes elected to stay home from the games due to concerns about the

Anthropologist Erika Larkins Recaps The Challenges, Criticism, And Success Of The 2016 Rio Olympics

World Views: August 19, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the ethical issues of China's use of prisoners for organ transplants. The country says the practice has ended, but doctors and non-governmental organizations question whether or not that's true. They also discuss political strife in South Africa. Later, we'll revisit Suzette's 2013 conversation with Oklahoma City television journalist Erielle Reshef. Earlier in her career she spent several years working for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority. Two weeks ago she announced she's leaving her television job at KOCO Channel 5.

Best Of 'World Views': An Oklahoma Journalist Finds Humanity In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Editor's Note: This conversation originally aired Sept. 13, 2013. Between 2010 and 2012, Oklahoma City native Erielle Reshef reported twice from Gaza during instances of cross-border violence between Israelis and Palestinians. She stood next to an Israeli Iron Dome missile defense system covering the firefight for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority (IBA). But even as the Katyushsa rockets headed toward the country, she told KGOU's World Views she never once felt unsafe. "I know that may sound very strange, but I think as a journalist you get yourself into a mindset where it's so important for you to tell the story in that moment," Reshef says. "You don't want to be reckless by any stretch of the imagination, but you really want to try to focus on what you're doing." Reshef also reported from northern Israel in 2011 when Hamas militants released Israeli Defense Forces soldier Gilad Shalit. Israel freed 1,027 Palestinian prisoners in an exchange deal after Shalit spent five years in

Best Of 'World Views': An Oklahoma Journalist Finds Humanity In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Whether Positive Or Negative, 'Sports Diplomacy' Shines During Rio Olympics

Beyond the athletic competition, feats of strength, and patriotic triumph, the Olympics serve as a moment where countries can come together and put their differences aside. But politics has played out during the first week of competition. Russia's athletes haven't received the warmest welcome in Rio de Janeiro after widespread allegations of state-sponsored doping that nearly saw the entire team banned from the 2016 Summer Games. The tensions has been noticeable in the Aquatics Stadium, especially after swimmer Lilly King wagged her finger immediately after winning the gold medal over second-place finisher Yulia Efimova in the 100-meter breaststroke final. With a finger wag to prove it, contempt for doping spilled over into the Olympic pool pic.twitter.com/35SJzlWRjI — NYT Sports (@NYTSports) August 10, 2016"This has turned into what that Russian competitor is calling 'the new Cold War,'" University of Oklahoma College of International Studies assistant dean and comparative politics

Whether Positive Or Negative, 'Sports Diplomacy' Shines During Rio Olympics

World Views: August 12, 2016

In the early 1900s, opponents of the Shah wrote a constitution and established a parliament in Iran. Suzette Grillot talks with Boston University historian Houchang Chehabi about Iran's brief 20th century experiment with democracy. But first, Rebecca Cruise joins the show to talk about some of the positive and negative moments of sportsmanship in the Olympics.

'Best Of World Views': Sporting Events Renew Focus On Rio's Favelas, But Residents Still Left Behind

Editor's Note: This interview originally aired June 3, 2014.. A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer's international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won't be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he's "appalled" by his country's preparations for the sport's biggest event.

'Best Of World Views': Sporting Events Renew Focus On Rio's Favelas, But Residents Still Left Behind

Optimism Grows, But Security Concerns Still Influence Brazilians' Attitudes About Rio Olympics

The 2016 Summer Olympics open Friday night in Rio de Janeiro. Like soccer's World Cup two years ago, the event has drawn the world's attention to Brazil's largest city and raised questions about health, security, and the country's economic and political climate. University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins has spent the past year living and working in Rio. She told KGOU's World Views Brazil has a track record of succeeding when it throws parties on a global scale – from the annual Carnival festival before the Lenten season, to the annual New Year's celebration. "Brazilians are amazing hosts, and they are very proud of their country even though they know that it's passing through a difficult moment," Larkins said. "The atmosphere in the last week has started to shift from a lot of criticism or 'Why did we do this?" Why are we hosting these Olympics? These are not good for the Brazilian people,' to 'Well, the Olympics are going to happen, and because they're going to happen,

Optimism Grows, But Security Concerns Still Influence Brazilians' Attitudes About Rio Olympics

World Views: August 5, 2016

As the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Rio de Janeiro, we revisit Suzette Grillot's 2014 conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about the city's poorest neighborhoods. Larkins then joins the show from Brazil to provide an update on the city's mood and preparation ahead of Friday's opening ceremonies.

Violent Week In Germany Raises Questions About Migrants, Intelligence-Gathering Laws

Europe continues to reel from violence that has swept over the continent in recent weeks. France is still mourning the loss of more than 80 people killed while celebrating Bastille Day earlier this month. They were killed when a man drove a truck through a crowded promenade in Nice as the seaside resort in the French Rivera celebrated the national holiday. France's neighbor, Germany, saw four incidents of violence in less than a week between July 18 and 24. A German teenager in Munich went on a killing spree at a shopping mall, killing nine. A refugee from Afghanistan attacked four passengers on a train in Wurzburg, a suicide bomber tried to enter a concert with a backpack filled with explosives in Ansbach, injuring 15. And in Reutlingen a Syrian asylum seeker killed a pregnant woman with an axe. "They're not all terrorist-related, but because these keep happening one on top of the other, that seems to be the conclusion people automatically jump to," University of Oklahoma College of

Violent Week In Germany Raises Questions About Migrants, Intelligence-Gathering Laws

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