APR News Reports

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Special features and reports from the News team at Alabama Public Radio.More from APR News Reports »

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SPLC's Mark Potok on Extremist and Hate Groups

The news headlines over the past year have been dominated by tensions. Conflicts over illegal immigration, refugee resettlement, terrorism and community race relations all led to deep divisions nationwide. Those conflicts also became the center of a bitterly contested Presidential election. The Southern Poverty Law Center recently released its latest list and analysis of extremist and hate groups nationwide, and it appears that climate bred new hate groups. Mark Potok is a senior fellow with the SPLC. He's the primary editor of their HateWatch list and wrote an analysis of this year's results.

Westminster's Rumor Is #1

Rumor is only the second German Shepherd to win Best in Show at Westminster. The last time her breed took top prize was thirty years ago in 1987. In fact, the two German Shepherds are the only winners ever from the Herding Group. ***************************

"...and justice for all." — A Series by Alabama Public Radio

The four person Alabama Public Radio news team, with no budget, spent six months researching and producing this series on justice and prison reform. Within weeks of airing the first parts of this series, the U.S. Justice Department announced an investigation into Alabama's prison system, and a lawsuit over inmate mental health care was granted class action status. The chief inmate witness in the case against the Alabama Department of Corrections committed suicide shortly after testifying. Alabama House and Senate bills have been introduced to revoke the Judicial death penalty override law. WHAT'S THREE YEARS ON DEATH ROW WORTH?/Pat Alabama's prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, allegations of mismanagement and corruption, and a failed prison building plan in the state legislature have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the

Steve Flowers on Bob Jones

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Made in Alabama: A Look at Alabama Makers

If you ask residents of Illinois what product that state is best known for, the answer might be farm equipment. Illinois, after all, is the home of John Deere. Kentucky might point to Bourbon Whiskey, and Wisconsin is the headquarters of Harley Davidson motorcycles. The state of Alabama has a few homegrown products you might not know about. One good place to find these Alabama Makers are t events like these. We're at a Makers Market where Alabama craftsmen and women gather to show their wares and promote their business. The Alabama Tourism Department spent all of 2016 highlighting local craftsmen and women across Alabama. Lee Sentell is Alabama's Tourism Director... "We saw how many people there are all over the state of Alabama who are making items that are a higher level of what you would think of as crafts, its fine art for many of them and its locally sourced materials and it's a growing industry and it shows the creative spirit of people in Alabama." Markets like this show off a

Justice Reform: When the jury says "life in prison," and the judge says "death..."

Alabama's prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, allegations of mismanagement and corruption, and a failed prison building plan in the state legislature have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state's prison system and what happens when they come out. I looked into the on-going complaints over how Alabama judges sentence people to death. "I just want what's right for my brother," says Jodi Kirkland of Andalusia. Her brother Roy Doster is on Alabama's death row. "Because he didn't kill that man. I don't know about the one in Texas," she says. "But, Texas ain't trying to kill him." Putting it lightly, the Alabama Judicial system doesn't consider Roy Doster to be a boy scout. Both killings occurred after he broke out of jail in Covington County. That's why Doster is on death row... "It's total misery. It's like being in a

Justice Reform: When the jury says "life in prison," and the judge says "death..."

Overall Excellence "Alabama 2016" Alabama Public Radio

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio's entry for Overall Excellence, Small Market Radio. Our submission is titled "Alabama 2016." Web site examples are at the bottom of the page. 2016 saw high profile court trials of two powerful Alabama politicians and a sex scandal involving the Governor. The four member Alabama Public Radio news team was the only radio news operation "on the scene" to cover the ethics trial, guilty verdict, and expulsion of State House Speaker Mike Hubbard. APR also brought its listeners the trial and suspension of State Chief Justice Roy Moore for ordering Alabama's county Probate judges to ignore the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on same sex marriage. Alabama Public Radio also covered the indictment of a former NASA astronaut for the fatal traffic accident that killed two girls near Tuscaloosa. Alabama's prison system and justice system are in the national spotlight and not for good reasons. The State's prisons are one hundred percent overcapacity. Alabama is

Healthy Teeth - Healthy Pet

Dogs - especially certain breeds - have a natural smile, but all pets can benefit from having healthy teeth and gums. It not only makes them look better, they feel better, too. And that makes everybody smile! **************

Best Series: "Tuscaloosa Tornado--5 Year Anniversary" Alabama Public Radio

Steve Miller April 19, 2016 All week long on Alabama Public Radio, we're looking back on the tornadoes that hit the state five years ago on April 27, 2011. Twelve percent of Tuscaloosa was destroyed, over fifty people were killed, and countless lives were changed forever. The very first victim of the tornado APR met face to face was Steve Miller of Tuscaloosa. Now, five years later, APR's Pat Duggins checks in to see how Miller is doing... "Has it really been five years? Oh, my gosh..." Steve Miller's come a long way since April 27, 2011. He lives in Tuscaloosa's Hillcrest neighborhood. His new home has lots of windows and there's plenty of art on the walls. You might not think anything was out of the ordinary. But, the first time APR visited here, things were a lot different. "All we could hear were sirens. And then, at night, houses going up in flames around. We could see that there were houses were burning. And that was the only light, except for the distant light of the city. And it

Best Series: "Tuscaloosa Tornado--5 Year Anniversary" Alabama Public Radio

Best Soft News Feature "How Much is Three Years on Death Row Worth?" Alabama Public Radio

Alabama likes to trumpet its Wrongful Incarnation Act, which is supposed to compensate people sent to prison for crimes they didn't commit. However, in the fifteen years since the passage of the Act, only one person has been paid, and that was under a court order. This entry focuses on Randall Padgett of Guntersville, who was released after three years on death row. His requests to the State for compensation have, to date, been turned down. SCRIPT Reparations/Pat Alabama's prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, allegations of mismanagement and corruption, and a failed prison building plan in the state legislature have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state's prison system and what happens when they come out. Today, APR's Pat Duggins reports on what the State does for people who are convicted of crimes they didn't do. It

Best Soft News Feature "How Much is Three Years on Death Row Worth?" Alabama Public Radio

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