APR News Reports

From Alabama Public Radio

Special features and reports from the News team at Alabama Public Radio.More from APR News Reports »

Most Recent Episodes

Storm Planning for Your Pet

Keeping your pet safe in a disaster situation may depend on a little advance planning - just in case something should happen. Whether your best friend has fur, or feathers, or scales, it depends on you to keep it safe and get it out of harm's way in time. *************************

House Barely Passes Bentley's Lottery Bill, Sidewalk Film Fest Kicks Off in Birmingham

The Alabama House of Representatives approved Gov. Robert Bentley's proposed state lottery last night by an extremely tight margin. Representatives voted 64-35 for the bill late last night, barely clearing the 63 votes required to clear the 105-seat House. The vote came after 10 hours of back-and-forth debate and two vote attempts. Lottery supporters cheered in the House as newly-elected Speaker Mac McCutcheon announced the bill's eventual success. Governor Bentley is seeking the first statewide vote on a lottery since 1999. The Republican governor proposed a lottery as a way to provide money to the state's cash-strapped Medicaid program and other state services. Alabama is one of six states without a state lottery. The bill now returns to the Alabama Senate where lawmakers must decide whether to go along with House changes to the bill. The Senate passed their version of the bill last week without a single vote to spare. This weekend, Birmingham is hosting its annual Sidewalk Film

House Barely Passes Bentley's Lottery Bill, Sidewalk Film Fest Kicks Off in Birmingham

NTSB: Plane lost fuel pumps before Alabama crash, killing 6, Poverty simulation in Tuscaloosa

Federal aviation investigators say a pilot told air traffic controllers that fuel pumps aboard the plane were failing before it plunged to the ground and caught fire near Tuscaloosa, killing six people from Mississippi. A preliminary report on the crash released this morning by the National Transportation Safety Board says the pilot reported one fuel pump failure. After that, when he was a few miles from Tuscaloosa's airport, reported that the plane lost "the other fuel pump." The twin-engine Piper struck trees near the Tuscaloosa suburb of Northport as it attempted to land at Tuscaloosa's airport Aug. 14. Authorities say the six people killed were flying to Oxford, Mississippi, where they were from, before trying to land in Alabama because of the emergency. The NTSB is continuing to investigate. An event this afternoon will give a few Tuscaloosa citizens the chance to learn what life is like for people living in poverty. Alabama Possible and the United Way of West Alabama are teaming

NTSB: Plane lost fuel pumps before Alabama crash, killing 6, Poverty simulation in Tuscaloosa

Bentley's Lottery Bill Faces Critical House Vote, Female Business Workshop in Huntsville

A lottery bill is heading to a critical vote in the Alabama House of Representatives. Today's vote could determine whether a proposed state lottery goes before Alabama voters later this year or if the bill dies in the special session. House members will debate Gov. Robert Bentley's proposed state lottery. Bentley is seeking the first statewide referendum on the establishment of a lottery since voters rejected the idea in 1999. The Senate passed the bill last week without a single vote to spare, and the House vote is expected to be close. Representatives will need 63 votes for the proposed constitutional amendment to clear the House. There is some disagreement as to whether the referendum could appear on the general election ballot November 8. Secretary of State John Merrill says lawmakers appear to have missed the deadline, but he's seeking an emergency opinion from state Attorney General Luther Strange. Senators believe they have until the end of the week. Legislators will convene

Bentley's Lottery Bill Faces Critical House Vote, Female Business Workshop in Huntsville

Justice Reform: When the jury says "life in prison," and the judge says "death..."

Alabama's prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, allegations of mismanagement and corruption, and a failed prison building plan in the state legislature have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state's prison system and what happens when they come out. I looked into the on-going complaints over how Alabama judges sentence people to death. "I just want what's right for my brother," says Jodi Kirkland of Andalusia. Her brother Roy Doster is on Alabama's death row. "Because he didn't kill that man. I don't about the one in Texas," she says. "But, Texas ain't trying to kill him." Putting it lightly, the Alabama Judicial system doesn't consider Roy Doster to be a boy scout. Both killings occurred after he broke out of jail in Covington County. That's why Doster is on death row... "It's total misery. It's like being in a nightmare

Justice Reform: When the jury says "life in prison," and the judge says "death..."

Merrill seeking an AG opinion on lottery vote, Tuscaloosa VA to hold job fair

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says he believes a November lottery referendum is no longer possible, but is seeking an opinion from the attorney general's office. Merrill believes the law is clear that today is the deadline for Alabama Lawmakers to approve a constitutional amendment and addit on the November ballot. They missed that deadline. However, Merrill has asked for an emergency opinion from the attorney general's office to see if he could alter the ballot if lawmakers pass the lottery bill later this week The secretary of state says ballots will be printed Monday. Sen. Jim McClendon said lawmakers had until Friday based on a law that allowed "amendments" to ballots up to 74 days before an election. Merrill says that section related to changes to candidates' names. The Tuscaloosa Veterans Hospital is holding a job fair at the University of Alabama's Campus. More than 30 different businesses are coming together to look for potential employees among Tuscaloosa's veterans

Merrill seeking an AG opinion on lottery vote, Tuscaloosa VA to hold job fair

State Senate to Debate Oil Spill Settlement, Tuscaloosa VA Hosts Veterans' Job Fair

Alabama Senators will be debating how to divvy up the state's portion of oil spill settlement money amid a looming hole in the Medicaid budget. The Alabama Senate is expected to take up the settlement bill today. A version of the legislation passed the House last week. Debate on the Senate floor could get contentious, though, as Senators can't seem to agree on how much money should help Medicaid and how much should go toward road projects on the Alabama coast. The bill that passed the House would use $450 million to pay back money borrowed during previous budget shortfalls, and nearly $200 million for road projects in coastal counties. Paying down debt early would free up an additional $70 million for the state's Medicaid program next fiscal year, which is currently $85 million underfunded. Some senators argue the settlement money should be used only for state debts and Medicaid, not roads. South Alabama lawmakers say they're the ones who were impacted by the oil spill, and they

State Senate to Debate Oil Spill Settlement, Tuscaloosa VA Hosts Veterans' Job Fair

Town raises money for the families of 5 slain, LWV trying to increase turnout in elections

Residents of a southwest Alabama town where five people were slain are trying to raise money to help the victims' families pay funeral expenses. Authorities say 27-year-old Derrick Dearman of Leakesville, Mississippi killed five people at a house where his estranged girlfriend has sought refuge from him. The bodies were found Saturday. Relatives of some of the victims have started an online fundraiser, and a plastic jug for donations sits on the counter of a convenience store a couple miles from the scene of the massacre near Citronelle, located in southwest Alabama. Residents say all the victims were related by blood or marriage. Dearman is awaiting extradition back to Alabama. More exercise and less sitting can help stop the number one killer of Alabamians. A new report from the American Heart Association recommends thirty minutes of exercise a day to help avoid heart disease and strokes. However, researchers say exercise doesn't help people who spend the rest of their day sitting

Town raises money for the families of 5 slain, LWV trying to increase turnout in elections

Latest on Alabama Legislative Special Session, New Report Illustrates Alabamians' Heart Risk

The Alabama House of Representatives will take up debate on a lottery proposal championed by Governor Robert Bentley after it narrowly passed the Senate last week. The bill would put the establishment of an Alabama lottery to the voters for the first time since 1999. The House Tourism Committee could hear the bill tomorrow. Meanwhile, Senators have advanced a bill that could help fill an immediate $85 million hole in the state's Medicaid budget. The Senate Tourism and Marketing Committee approved a measure on Friday that would use $450 million of incoming BP settlement money to pay down state debt and nearly $200 million on road projects in coastal Alabama counties. That bill has already passed the House, but is expected to hit a roadblock on the Senate floor. Senator Paul Sanford of Huntsville says he will push for a substitute bill. He believes the money should go toward state debt and Medicaid, not roads. Heart disease is considered the number one killer of Alabamians. A new report

Latest on Alabama Legislative Special Session, New Report Illustrates Alabamians' Heart Risk

2016 Hero Dog Awards, Part 4

The 2015 Hero Dog Awards seek to find and recognize dogs who help people in many important ways. Dogs are nominated in one of eight categories: Service Dogs, Emerging Hero Dogs, Law Enforcement, Arson Dogs, Therapy Dogs, Military Dogs, Guide/Hearing Dogs, Search and Rescue Dogs.

Back To Top