The Write Question

The Write Question

From Montana Public Radio

The Write Question is a weekly literary program that features authors from the western United States, including James Lee Burke, Maile Meloy, Thomas McGuane, Kim Barnes, Robert Wrigley, Jess Walter, Pam Houston, Barry Lopez, and hundreds of others.More from The Write Question »

Most Recent Episodes

Rats Did Not Cause The Plague! And Their Long Tails Are Extraordinary

As much a moving memoir as it is an amusing pet manual, Misunderstood is a unique nonfiction book for teens and tweens about domesticated rats in general and a wonderful rat named Iris in particular. Brimming with smarts and energy just like its furry subjects, Rachel Toor's text blends history and science with profiles of interesting people and autobiographical anecdotes as it joyfully sets the record straight about why this reviled creature is actually a most amazing species. Readers will come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of domestic rats—and may be convinced to adopt one themselves. The Write Question blogThe Write Question on FacebookThe Write Question on TwitterThe Write Question podcast Rachel Toor has been an admissions officer at Duke University, a high school cross country coach at the North Carolina School of Science and Math, an SAT prep tutor, and she currently teaches writing at Eastern Washington University in Spokane. A featured columnist for The

'The Shadow Cadets of Pennyroyal Academy': Logan Reviews

Hi, I'm Logan, here to tell you about The Shadow Cadets of Pennyroyal Academy, a novel for young readers written by M. A. Larson.

The Story Of The World's Most Famous Grizzly Bear

Celebrating the most famous family of grizzly bears in the world — specifically matriarch 399 and her offspring — renowned nature photographer Thomas D. Mangelsen has been tracking and photographing these bruins of Greater Yellowstone for 10 years, amassing an incomparable portfolio that offers an intimate glimpse into the lives of this celebrated bear family.

'Supergirl At Super Hero High': Logan Reviews

This is Logan, and I'm here to tell you about Supergirl at Super Hero High, the sequel to a previous book that I reviewed, Wonder Woman at Super Hero High. Both books are by the same author, Lisa Yee. Supergirl at Super Hero High also takes place at Super Hero High, but this time the story tells us how Supergirl becomes a super hero. The book is third person limited, which means, as I said in a previous review, you only see inside one person's thoughts. The book is exciting, funny, and VERY suspenseful.

Novel Captures Romance, Racism, And Rodeo In 20th-Century Montana

As Evelynne Lowry, the daughter of a copper baron, comes of age in early 20th century Montana, the lives of horses dovetail with the lives of people and her own quest for womanhood becomes inextricably intertwined with the future of two men who face nearly insurmountable losses—a lonely steer wrestler named Zion from the Montana highline, and a Cheyenne team roper named William Black Kettle, the descendant of peace chiefs. An epic that runs from the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864 to the ore and industry of the 1930s, American Copper is a novel not only about America's hidden desire for regeneration through violence but the ultimate cost of forgiveness and the demands of atonement. It also explores the genocidal colonization of the Cheyenne, the rise of big copper, and the unrelenting ascent of dominant culture.

'The Goblin's Puzzle': Logan Reviews

The Goblin's Puzzle, by Andrew S. Chilton, is a very exciting book. I loved it as soon as I started reading it. It is fun, funny, and amazing. The main character is a boy with no name. This is because he was never given one. I can't really explain it because: 1. It's a spoiler, and 2. I don't really know how it happened myself. I love how The Goblin's Puzzle details suspense, mystery, and a desire to do the right thing. It was intriguing, and anyone who wants to read it should. I would recommend this book for second grade and up.

Coming Of Age, Poisoned By The Vietnam War

For a long time, Marian Palaia wrote short stories, instead of a novel. Not because she didn't want to write a whole book, but because she was terrified: "It was such a huge undertaking and I thought you had to know what you were doing... "

Book Celebrates Native Culture With Images And Poetry

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis. In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund. The music in this program was written and performed by John Flordis. The Write Question blogThe Write Question on FacebookThe Write Question on TwitterThe Write Question podcast Sue Reynolds is passionate about creating bridges of understanding between Native and non-Native peoples. Her images have appeared in exhibits in San Francisco, Montana, and Japan, and in many publications, including Cowboys & Indians, Montana Magazine, and Indian Country Today. Her photographs are in collections nationwide.

Annick Smith Travels With Bruno

About the book: In Crossing the Plains with Bruno, Annick Smith weaves together a memoir of travel and relationship, western history and family history, human love and animal love centering around a two week road trip across the Great Plains she and 95 pound chocolate lab, Bruno, took in the summer of 2003. It is a chain of linked meditations, often triggered by place, about how the past impinges on the present and how the present can exist seemingly sans past.Traveling from her rural homestead in Montana to pick up her nearly 100-year-old mother from her senior residence on Chicago's North Side and bring her to the family's beach house on a dune overlooking Lake Michigan, Smith often gets lost in memory and rambling contemplation. Bruno's constant companionship and ever present needs force her to return to the actual, reminding her that she, too, is an animal whose existence depends on being alert to the scents, sights, hungers, and emotions of the moment.

'Going Where It's Dark': Logan Reviews

This is Logan, here to tell you about Going where it's Dark, a book for young adult readers written by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. Going where it's Dark by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is a very exciting book, and I couldn't put it down once I started reading it. The main character is Buck Anderson, a thirteen-year-old boy who struggles with problems, including bullying and stuttering. He overcomes the bullying problem but instead of learning how to not stutter, he learns how to not fight it and be able to stutter more easily.

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