Word of Mouth Word of Mouth is conversations about new trends, what's bubbling up in the culture, and the news, science, and tech stories you aren't hearing about in the day's headlines. Produced by New Hampshire Public Radio
Word of Mouth

Word of Mouth

From New Hampshire Public Radio

Word of Mouth is conversations about new trends, what's bubbling up in the culture, and the news, science, and tech stories you aren't hearing about in the day's headlines. Produced by New Hampshire Public RadioMore from Word of Mouth »

Most Recent Episodes

From Small Mountains to Twin Peaks

Diehard New Hampshire hikers tend to fixate on four-thousand footers, but as any peak bagger who's climbed Owl's Head or Mount Isolation knows, big mountains aren't always the best mountains. On today's show, a day out with a heartwarming hiking group that's been shouldering packs since 1979: the Over the Hill Hikers. We continue with a seemingly simple listener question about the Wapack Range that sends our producer into a geological can of worms for this week's Only in New Hampshire segment. And, Twin Peaks is back and weirder than ever. We'll talk to Kristine McKenna , the author who collaborated on a forthcoming memoir and biography of David Lynch, about the filmmaker's life and career. David Lynch is being honored at this year's Medal Day at the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough.

This N.H. Hiking Club Has Been 'Over The Hill' For Decades

There are loads of hiking groups in New Hampshire—groups for women, families with young kids, birders...a quick search on Facebook will turn up one or more that fits your style. The Over the Hill Hikers club has been climbing New Hampshire's mountains since 1979. Back then, the group's schedule was mailed out by hand. Word of Mouth's Virginia Prescott recently took a hike with the club, and came back with plenty of stories to tell.

You Asked, We Answered: What Made The Wapack Range ?

When we started asking for questions from our listeners about the state, we got pages and pages of submissions online; so many we couldn't answer them all. So I combed through and picked one that sounded interesting to me. And that's how I ended up calling a woman named Jen, and asking one of the stupidest questions I've ever asked.

You Asked, We Answered: Are There Secret Archaeological Sites In N.H.?

As part of our continuing series Only in New Hampshire , we're answering questions posed by Granite Staters about their communities. Producer Molly Donahue tackled this one: "Is it true the NH Division of Historic Resources has a secret list of archaeological site locations to protect them from looting and development?" The short answer? Yes. (Sort of.)

You Asked, We Answered: Are There Secret Archaeological Sites In N.H.?

New Hampshire: The Birthplace of the Summer Camp

Paul Hutchinson is a Boston University lecturer and co-curator of an exhibit on New Hampshire's summer camp history. It's on view at the Museum of the White Mountains in Plymouth until September 13. I went to the museum to see the exhibition and to talk to Paul about the long history our state has as a summer camp getaway.

George Carlin's New Hampshire Camp Connection

Kelly's dad grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. She remembers her father, George, telling stories of growing up in "Irish Harlem", a pretty rough neighborhood squeezed between Spanish Harlem, Black Harlem and Columbia University. George was a straight-up "city kid", but each summer from about the age of 6 or 7, until he was a tween, George escaped to New Hampshire, and a Catholic boy's camp called Camp Notre Dame on Spofford Lake.

Summer Camps, Only in NH, & Civics 101

New Hampshire is the mainspring for America's summer camp story. The birthplace of a tradition that has shaped the lives of not only local kids, but kids we'd now call "at risk". Kids who'd never been out of their city or even neighborhood. And a number of celebrities spent their summers tucked away at Squam, Spofford, or Winnipesaukee lakes. People, like Paul Fireman, the founder of Reebok. James Frey, the once disgraced then quasi-redeemed author of A Million Little Pieces . Actors and siblings Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal, Fight Club ' s Edward Norton; The Breakfast Club's Judd Nelson. Generations of adults forged in the shared experience of camp, the bunk-beds, the letters home, the bug bites and the bad food. Today on Word of Mouth, we go back to camp. Plus we'll answer one of your questions from the Only in New Hampshire mail bag, and we'll go to civics class to learn more about The Speaker of the House.

Only in NH: Car Inspections, Animals with Bad Reputations, & Lyme Disease

On today's show: Only in NH: You asked, we answered! Why does New Hampshire still require annual car inspections? NHPR's Casey McDermott went in search of answers. Our very own Jimmy Gutierrez talked to Margaret Gillespie a naturalist at Squam Lake Science Center about Animals with Bad Reputations and then talked to the team about a creature that might deserve its bad rap: the tick. You can visit the Red Barn Speaker Series at the New Hampshire Audubon to hear a talk about some animals who get a bad rap, and why you might want to give them a second chance. Keb' Mo stops by WMOT Roots Radio to discuss how he lives life and how he loves music, including his new TajMo collaboration with Taj Mahal. Listen again at PRX.org .

Only in NH: Car Inspections, Animals with Bad Reputations, & Lyme Disease

The Question of Livermore, Civics 101, & Andrew Greer

On today's show: Producer Hannah McCarthy takes a drive up to Livermore to find out why a recent census listed the ghost town's population as "3". Civics 101: Church & State Producer Molly Donahue answers the Only in New Hampshire question: is it true there's a secret list of archaeological sites in New Hampshire? Less is the new novel of the by Andrew Sean Greer , the O. Henry Award winning author who will be at Writers in the Loft on Monday, July 24 . Inspired by today's show and want to join in a dig this summer? You can learn more about the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (SCRAP) here.

You Asked, We Answered: What Happened to the People in That N.H. Ghost Town?

The woods of New Hampshire are scattered with signs of civilization: crumbling foundations, railroad spikes, scraps of unidentifiable metal. Find enough of these in one place, and you're probably looking at a ghost town - a place people once called home, and have long-since abandoned.

You Asked, We Answered: What Happened to the People in That N.H. Ghost Town?

Back To Top