The Takeaway

The Takeaway

From PRI

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. Hosted by John Hockenberry, The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.More from The Takeaway »

Most Recent Episodes

School Politics, Pioneering Women, Obama's Foreign Policy Legacy

Coming up on today's show: Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of education, goes before the Senate today. Defenders of DeVos say her efforts to disrupt the educational establishment can only improve graduation rates across the country. But many opponents have concerns that she will use her wealth to entice states to take money away from public schools. James Goenner, president and chief executive of the National Charter Schools Institute, and Diane Ravitch, a former assistant secretary of education under President George H.W. Bush, weigh in. Over the weekend, Democrats and activists rallied to fight the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, discusses the lesser-known provisions that could be lost under a repeal. British Prime Minister Theresa May delivered a landmark address on Tuesday on the U.K.'s plan to leave the European Union. During her speech, she rejected partial membership in the E.U. and said the United Kingdom would "not seek membership of the single market but the greatest possible access to it." Robin Wigglesworth, U.S. markets editor for The Financial Times, explains. Today, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Lynch v. Dimaya, an immigration case that will consider whether part of the definition of "crime of violence," which makes individuals deportable, is unconstitutionally vague. The case involves a man from the Philippines who was convicted of burglary. Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a law professor at Santa Clara University, hast the details. As the nation's capital prepares to host tens of thousands of women for the Women's March on Washington, we look back at a number of female trailblazers with Julie Scelfo, journalist and author of "The Women Who Made New York." Is the United States stronger or weaker because of President Obama's foreign policy decisions? For answers, we turn to Susan Glasser, foreign affairs columnist at POLITICO, and Steve Clemons, Washington editor-at-large for The Atlantic.

Obama's Cultural Impact, Alec Baldwin on Playing Trump, John Kerry's Legacy

Coming up on today's show: How will history view President Obama's efforts to reform the criminal justice system? We look back at his successes and failures with Glenn E. Martin, president and founder of the advocacy group JustLeadershipUSA. John Kerry will take his last lap as secretary of state this week. He visited Paris over the weekend for Middle East peace talks, and will head to London today to meet with his U.K. Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson. Jonathan Marcus, diplomatic correspondent for the BBC, explores Kerry's legacy. Melissa Locker, culture reporter for The Guardian, TIME, and The Takeaway, looks back at Barack Obama's cultural legacy as the 44th president prepares to leave office. President Obama dedicated a number of new national monuments on Thursday that aim to preserve the country's civil rights history. Khalil Muhammad, professor of history, race, and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the author of "The Condemnation of Blackness," looks at the significance of these monuments on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Last week, The Takeaway spoke with actor and activist Alec Baldwin about his fight to shut down the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant just north of New York City. Today, Baldwin weighs in on the election and the role as President-elect Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live." Cornell Belcher is the author of "A Black Man In The White House" and was a lead pollster for the Democratic National Committee under Howard Dean. He was also a member of President Obama's polling team for both the 2008 and 2012 campaigns, and speaks with Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich about the racial politics that divide the country today.

Obama's Cultural Impact, Alec Baldwin on Playing Trump, John Kerry's Legacy

Investigating the FBI, Actor Alec Baldwin, Fighting for LGBT Equality

Coming up on today's show: The Justice Department inspector general announced Thursday that he would investigate the DOJ and the FBI, and whether FBI Director James Comey followed official policy during the department's investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails in the months leading up to the election. Michael Bromwich, the former inspector general for the Department of Justice, weighs in. Cubans coming to the U.S. will no longer be granted automatic residency under new rules announced yesterday by the Obama Administration. Tim Padgett, the Americas correspondent for public radio station WLRN in Miami, has the details. Yesterday, the EPA accused Fiat Chrysler of cheating on emissions tests. The company allegedly used secret software that allowed more than 100,000 diesel vehicles to emit illegal pollutant levels, something that the EPA calls "a clear and serious violation of the Clean Air Act." John Stoll, global auto editor for The Wall Street Journal in Detroit, explains what this could med for the company and consumers. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, drops by to review the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including the animated children's film "Monster Trucks," and the horror flick "The Bye Bye Man." Actor Alec Baldwin and activist Paul Gallay, president of the advocacy group Riverkeeper, discuss the closing of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant in New York, and the future of renewable energy sources in the Empire State and beyond. A new documentary, "Growing Up Coy," tells the story of a young Colorado family fighting for their 6-year-old transgender daughter's right to use the girls' bathroom at her elementary school. Coy Mathis' case is one of the first in the nation that specifically addresses transgender bathroom rights. The Takeaway hears from Eric Juhola, director and producer of the film, and Jeremy Stulberg, the producer and editor of "Growing Up Coy." Heather Cronk, the former co-director of GetEQUAL, a national LGBTQ organizing network, examine's President Barack Obama's legacy on gay marriage, transgender rights, and LGBT discrimination.

Putin Frenzy, Blowback in Baltimore, Class Warfare

Coming up on today's show: How are lawmakers responding to recent allegations surrounding Russian interference in the U.S. election, and how will they hold the government and intelligence communities accountable to the American people? Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA), the ranking member of the CIA Subcommittee of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, answers. Journalist Glenn Greenwald, co-founder of the investigative news outlet The Intercept, responds to recent allegations of Russian interference in the U.S. election, and the legacy President Obama is leaving on surveillance policies. Kathy Rittereiser did not vote for President-elect Donald Trump, but she is in favor of his plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. We find out what her concerns are with her current law, and what she hopes the replacement will include. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings up to speed on a busy week of Senate confirmation hearings, and what the GOP is planning when it comes to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. Former presidential candidate Ben Carson, Donald Trump's pick for secretary of housing and urban development, goes before the Senate today for his confirmation hearing. Timothy McDaniel, an attorney and Carson's childhood friend, reflects on Carson's upbringing and how he may operate as HUD secretary. Attorney General Loretta Lynch will be in Baltimore on Thursday to speak on community policing and announce that the city has come to an agreement with the federal government on a consent decree for reform to the police department. With the state's attorney, Marilyn Mosby, under fire for her handling of the Freddie Gray prosecutions, what does the future hold for the city of Baltimore and its police force? Marc Steiner, president and executive producer of the Center for Emerging Media and host of the Marc Steiner Show on WEAA-FM in Baltimore, weighs in. The 2016 election shows just how divided America is along geographic, racial, economic, and social lines. Nancy Isenberg explores this cultural history in a new book, "White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America."

Obama's Farewell, Russian Secrets and Trump, Military Brutality

Coming up on today's show: Barack Obama delivered his final speech as president from his home city of Chicago on Tuesday night. Though he offered hope for the future, the violence plaguing the Windy City lurked in the shadows of his address. Ja'Mal Green, a community organizer and activist in Chicago, weighs in. Rex Tillerson, the former chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil and President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of state, will testify before the Senate during a confirmation hearing today. Suzanne Maloney, a former Middle East advisor for ExxonMobil and currently the deputy director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, explains why Tillerson should be confirmed. An explosive but unsubstantiated report on Donald Trump and his ties to Russia is raising new questions about the president-elect's connections to the Kremlin. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Endrew V. Douglas County School District, a suit brought by a Colorado couple who claim their autistic son was not provided an adequate education in the public school system. Wayne Steedman, a senior partner with The Steedman Law Group, has over 24 years of experience as a special education attorney and examines the case. On Tuesday, Dylann Roof was sentenced to death for killing nine worshippers at the Emanuel AME Church. Meg Kinnard, legal affairs reporter for the Associated Press in South Carolina, discusses Roof's sentence and explains how family members are reacting. A two and a half year investigation by The Intercept reveals a pattern of violence and abuse employed by the widely praised Seal Team 6 — the unit responsible for killing Osama bin Laden in 2011. For details on this story we turn to Matthew Cole, a reporter for The Intercept.

Evaluating Trump's AG Pick, Unrest in Mexico, A Homeless Crisis in The Golden State

Coming up on today's show: On Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee will begin to hold confirmation hearings for Senator Jeff Sessions, President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general. Janai Nelson, associate director-counsel of NAACP Legal, and J.D. Gordon, a former Pentagon spokesman and security and foreign policy advisor to Donald Trump's presidential campaign, examine Sessions' record. On Monday, President-elect Donald Trump announced that he would appoint his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as senior White House advisor. Norm Eisen, President Obama's White House ethics czar from 2009 to 2011 and a fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, weighs in on the potential conflicts of interest facing Kushner and Trump. A double digit increase in gas prices has led to looting and protests in Mexico, and the Trump Administration's plans to put more economic pressure on Mexico could make the situation worse and the border more difficult to protect. Elisabeth Malkin, Mexico reporter for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. Officials estimates there are at least 6,700 homeless people living in San Francisco. The mayor and city leaders have tried lots of things to combat homelessness, but the city's homeless population has remained steady for a decade. Why has nothing worked? Kevin Fagan, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle specializing in homelessness, weighs in. The new mayor of Sacramento, California has big plans for reducing homelessness and addressing mental health issues. Many are optimistic about what he'll accomplish, but there's still plenty standing in his way. Darrell Steinberg, the new mayor of Sacramento, discusses his plan today on The Takeaway. Today The Takeaway examines the story of Phillip Chance, a black man who died November 8th in an Alabama hospital. His decades-long journey through the criminal justice system is an epic story of missed opportunities, political grandstanding, and bad timing. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Jade Chance, Phillip's eldest daughter, weigh in.

Evaluating Trump's AG Pick, Unrest in Mexico, A Homeless Crisis in The Golden State

China Goes Green, A Refugee Fight in Vermont, Actress Kristin Davis

Coming up on today's show: Last Friday, the FBI, the CIA, and the NSA released a declassified report that concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin "ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the U.S. presidential election." David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details. On Friday, Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old Iraq War veteran, opened fire at Fort Lauderdale International Airport and killed five people. Santiago, who allegedly sought help for mental problems weeks ago, will make his first appearance in court today. For more on this story we turn to Davie Ovalle, who has been covering the story for the Miami Herald. President-elect Donald Trump says he will build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, though questions about who will pay for it are still up in the air. How will the wall affect people who own property on the Rio Grande? Travis Bubenik, a reporter with Marfa Public Radio in Texas, weighs in. In an unusual move, Donald Trump's transition team issued an order stating that all politically appointed American ambassadors need to leave their posts by Inauguration Day, with no grace period. W. Robert Pearson, ambassador to Turkey between 2000 and 2003, and currently a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington, joins The Takeaway to discuss the coming transition. China plans to spend more than $360 billion on renewable power sources and expects to dominate the renewable energy sector by 2020. Sam Geall, the executive editor of Chinadialogue and a research fellow at the Science Policy Research Unit, joins us to discuss the impact of China's latest announcement and how the nation may shape age of renewable energy going forward. The small city of Rutland, Vermont is making plans to welcome 100 Syrian and Iraqi refugees this month. But the issue has sharply divided its residents. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras weighs in. Journalist Rebecca Carroll speaks with actress Kristin Davis. Davis, who is white, adopted a black daughter, and discusses her experience with race in America.

Obamanomics, A Vietnam War Legacy, The Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Connection

Coming up on today's show: The final jobs report of Barack Obama's presidency will be released today. We look at the progress and economic setbacks he's had over the last eight years with Kenneth Rogoff, a professor of economics at Harvard and a former chief economist with the International Monetary Fund, and Gillian Tett, U.S. managing editor of the Financial Times. According to the United Nations, more than 7,000 have been killed in the Yemeni civil war since March 2015, and there are reports that around 2.2 million children are suffering from severe malnutrition as a result of the ongoing conflict. Adam Baron, a visiting fellow with the European Council on Foreign Relations and researcher at the Institute for Social Anthropology, weighs in. Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker discusses the TV shows you should be watching, including "This Is Us," "Girls," "Homeland," and "Planet Earth II." Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, offers a preview of the 2017 Golden Globe awards, which kick off this Sunday. In 1967, journalist Harrison Salisbury changed the way Americans viewed the Vietnam War and exposed the gap between political speak and public access to information. We explore how Salisbury forever changed U.S. politics with rare audio from the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas. Filmmaker Fisher Stevens discusses his new HBO film, "Bright Lights," which is an intimate look into the personal relationship between Debbie Reynolds and her daughter, Carrie Fisher.

Obamanomics, A Vietnam War Legacy, The Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Connection

The Fighting Feminist, The Keyboard Army, The Defiant Optimist

Coming up on today's show: The Senate Armed Services Committee holds their first hearing on alleged Russian hacking today, despite persistent skepticism from President-elect Donald Trump. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details. This week, three notable writers announced plans to leave Twitter. Among them is feminist writer Lindy West, who has long said that the social media service hasn't done enough to reign in trolls. She discusses her experience today on The Takeaway. Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte allegedly had a "keyboard army" of backers in the lead up to his election, some paid and some not, who posted on social media to silence dissenters and help create the illusion that he had widespread support. Sean Williams, a journalist reporting for The New Republic, explains. Durreen Shahnaz was the first Bangladeshi woman to graduate from the Wharton School of Business and to work on Wall Street. She launched the Impact Investment Exchange Asia in 2013 — the social stock exchange is going strong today and has funded a number of projects, including an initiative to convert power plants in Cambodia from diesel to biofuel. The sentencing trial for Dylann Roof is set to continue today with more than 30 witnesses testifying for federal attorneys. Jennifer Berry Hawes, a reporter The Post and Courier in South Carolina and author of an upcoming book about the Emanuel AME Church shooting, and Professor John Blume of Cornell Law School, weigh in on the trial and what's next. Republicans have vowed to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act. That makes Jacob Atkins, who is HIV positive, very nervous. He shares his story along with Mehgan McCarthy, a healthcare coordinator who helped Atkins navigate the insurance exchanges and get coverage through Obamacare.

Obamacare Up in Smoke, Ford Challenges Trump, Fighting Terror With Music

Coming up on today's show: As Republicans rally to repeal Obamacare, The Takeaway considers the future of the Affordable Care Act with Jonathan Gruber, one of the architects of the ACA and an economics professor at MIT, and Renée Landers, a professor of law at Suffolk University. On Tuesday, the Ford Motor Company announced that it was scrapping plans to build a new manufacturing plant in Mexico. The decision comes amid criticism from the Trump administration, but Ford says the decision was not made because of political pressure. Joe Hinrichs, president of the Americas at Ford Motor Company, explains. We continue our look at Chicago gun violence with a personal essay from Edwin Day, a former gang member who now works with youth to steer them away from gun violence. Diagnosed at the age of 17 with epilepsy and bipolar disorder, Sitawa Wafula found few avenues for support in her home country of Kenya. She started a blog about living with mental illness and has now set up Kenya's first free mental health support line, "My Mind, My Funk." The U.N. face many challenges in the year ahead, including ending the war in Syria and continuing to address and reign in climate change. Jan Eliasson, a Swedish diplomat who served as deputy secretary-general of the United Nations from July 2012 to December 2016, reflects on the challenges ahead for the United Nations in 2017. Karim Wasfi, a renowned cellist and the conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, uses music to heal in the face of terror. Last year, after a deadly car bomb exploded in a cafe, he sat with his cello and played amid the charred remains in protest of the violence and to "equalize" the terror with an act of creativity and beauty.

Obamacare Up in Smoke, Ford Challenges Trump, Fighting Terror With Music

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