PRI: Echoes Interviews

PRI: Echoes Interviews

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An Interview feature from echoes.orgMore from PRI: Echoes Interviews »

Most Recent Episodes

Echoes feature - Djam Karet

Djam Karet has been carrying the progressive music torch for 33 years. But in that span, they have pushed the envelope of modern instrumental music. Although they are in a lineage that includes King Crimson, Gong, The Soft Machine and The Mahavishnu Orchestra, among others, they aren't mired in Prog Rock's past, but point to a possible future. They have just put out one of their most concise and meticulous albums, Sonic Celluloid.

Echoes feature - Laliya

From Western Australia comes Laliya, the duo of James and Melissa McGuire. Since 1995 they've been creating an acoustic based sound with electronic extensions, like delays and loops, to create a world fusion of the imagination, using dulcimers, didgeridoo and hand percussion. After many years' absence, they've released a new album, The Middle Way.

Echoes feature - Erik Scott

Erik Scott has played bass with Alice Cooper and Flo and Eddie. He also co-founded the band Sonia Dada. But in his case, past wasn't prologue to the instrumental soundscapes of his album, In the Company of Clouds. Erik Scott talks about gospel choirs, pedal steel guitar and survival on Echoes.

Echoes feature - Philip Glass's 80th Birthday

We celebrate the 80th birthday of one of the Holy Trinity of Minimalism. Philip Glass turns 80 this year and it's hard to imagine the music of the last 50 years without him. He virtually reinvented the opera, brought minimalism into the concert hall and provided the ground upon which space music, EDM, and ambient chamber music were sown. We look back at the career of this pioneer who shows no signs of letting up, featuring interviews with Glass, Ravi Shankar, Godfrey Reggio and more.

Echoes feature - Philip Glass's 80th Birthday

Echoes feature - Ry X

Ry X is a musician from Australia. He's in that zone of ambient folk music like Bon Iver, Sufjan Stevens and Fink. He released a beautiful album last year called Dawn that draws from his surfer boy childhood in Australia, life in Berlin, and his global travels. But it all started when he was playing grunge in an Australian surf town.

Echoes feature - Alu

Los Angeles singer Alu has carved out a unique world of verbal wordplay and sonic illusion, creating a gothic cabaret for songs that often have bizarre, horror show imagery. There really is no other singer like Alu, though you can find elements of Kate Bush drama, Siouxsie Sioux doom, Liza Minnelli cabaret, and Lambert, Hendricks and Ross wordplay in her work. Her lyrics have a lot of wit, but her imagery is often macabre. Alu's life was recently sent into a tailspin, resulting from a fraudulent marriage and a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, but she's come out of it with one of her most biting, but also most witty albums.

Echoes feature - Jane Siberry

Jane Siberry came to renown in the 1980s with albums like The Speckless Sky, The Walking, and Bound by the Beauty and was spoken of in the same breath as artists like Kate Bush and later, Bjork and Tori Amos. She's been recording for 35 years, released 15 original albums, been signed to a major label and collaborated with many musicians and film directors including Brian Eno, k.d. lang and Wim Wenders. But she still feels relatively unknown. She's just released a new album called Angels Bend Closer. John Diliberto spoke to Jane Siberry from her home in Canada.

Echoes feature - Enigma

It has been 25 years since Enigma debuted with their hit album, MCMXC A.D. It was a recording that mixed Gregorian chants with space synthesizers and heavy breathing female vocals. Now Enigma creator Michael Cretu has returned with a new album, The Fall of a Rebel Angel that pays homage to the first in every way.

Echoes feature - Douglas Mcgowan

Before it was corporate music for spas and yoga studios, New Age music had adventurous, experimental Indie roots. Producer Douglas Mcgowen unearths them in two collections: I Am The Center, Private Issue New Age Music in America, 1950-1990 and The Microcosm, Visionary Music of Continental Europe, 1970-1986.

Echoes feature - Syrinx

Syrinx was an obscure Canadian band making an electronic space music a few years before Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze's seminal works. They released two albums in 1970 and 1971 and then faded away. But now those records have been unearthed and packaged as a collection called Tumblers from the Vault. John Mills-Cockell talks about his psychedelic electronic odyssey.

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