Interview Podcast – Echoes The Nightly Music Soundscape
Interview Podcast – Echoes

Interview Podcast – Echoes

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Endless Field Interview in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Endless Field in Echoes Podcast Bassist Ike Sturm and guitarist Jesse Lewis came up in New York's jazz scene playing with people like saxophonists Donny McCaslin and Chris Potter, trumpeters Wynton Marsalis and Kenny Wheeler, and singer Bobby McFerrin. But they also had other influences, such as the Paul Winter Consort, Windham Hill Records and ECM jazz. We'll hear the fascinating story behind this duo of intuitive improvisers, as they come in to talk about their gorgeous debut album.

Endless Field Interview in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Quindar's Hip Mobility in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Quindar's "Hip Moblity" in Echoes Podcast Mikael Jorgensen is the keyboard player with Wilco. James Merle Thomas has a PhD in Art History, and also happens to be an electronic musician. These two got together to form Quindar, and released their NASA–inspired debut this year, Hip-Mobility. James Merle Thomas: It was the name of an industrial film that features film of a spacesuit prototype, right, and it was truly intended to title a film that was describing how an astronaut could move or not move very well in in a clumsy, awkward spacesuit, But it also has other meanings that will be revealed, along with the meaning of "Quindar tones." We're receiving a message from space right now, in the Echoes Podcast.

Prequell's The Future Comes Before in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Prequell's "The Future Comes Before" reviewed in Echoes Podcast Fashion runway shows are not the places I usually look for music to play on Echoes. But if I had looked, I would've found the music of Prequell, the recording guise of French composer Thomas Roussel. He does shows for Pigalle, Michael Korrs, Christian Dior and other high fashion designers. He treats these shows as if he was scoring a movie and the sound is nothing if not cinematic. Now he has a new solo project called Prequell and he's released his debut album, The Future Comes Before. It merges a string orchestra with electronics, singers like Rae Morris and sounds from NASA to create a 21st century symphony that is dynamic and powerful. It's the Echoes October CD of the Month. Hear a review of this album in the Echoes Podcast.

Prequell's The Future Comes Before in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Australian Synthesist Jim Ottaway in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Electronic Music from Australian Outback with Jim Ottaway Creating electronic music is often an isolating endeavor. One person, in a room, dialing up the sounds of the universe on their own. But Australia's Jim Ottaway is probably more isolated than most, living at the borders of the bush in Queensland. But he's used that isolation to create 25 albums of electronic music since 2004. This year he was nominated for a Zone Music Reporter Award for his 2016 album, Invisible Vortex and while he was in New Orleans for the ceremony, he sat down to talk about electronic music in the bush.

Australian Synthesist Jim Ottaway in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

The Greatest Hoax & Death in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

The Greatest Hoax Interview in the Echoes Podcast Taylor Jordan is a climate control scientist and an electronic musicians and composer. He records as The Greatest Hoax, but his music is no joke and neither are his themes which include climate change and on his new album, death. He's created a conceptual album of ambient chamber music called Expiration Compositions. It's a recording of melancholy expanses with titles like "As the Light Dims", "Fading Away" and "Pulling Up the Sheets" that take you through the death cycle. But Jordan is not as morose or macabre as his subject matter suggests. Taylor Jordan: whenever I was writing the album and even like discussing it with people, people were like man, are you suicidal or is this an album for people who are suicidal? And I was thinking oh god, that's really not the purpose of this at all. The Greatest Hoax isn't reference to Paul is Dead, the Piltdown Man or The War of the Worlds. Although it does have something to do with climate change deniers. He isn't one. Find out what's behind his beautiful album of ambient chamber music compositions, Expiration Compositions in the Echoes Podcast.

The Greatest Hoax & Death in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Wilsen Dreams and Talks in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Wilsen Interview in the Echoes Podcast Wilsen is yet another group from Brooklyn, but they are fronted by singer and songwriter Tamsin Wilson who is from England via Canada. The group takes her last name, spelled with an "e' instead of an "o" and their latest album suggests the surreal way she writes. It's called I Go Missing In My Sleep. It was the Echoes CD of the Month in June. We go into Tamsin Wilson's dreams to find her.

Wilsen Dreams and Talks in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Echoes Podcast: Mystic Journey's Kingdom of Mountains - Interview Podcast – Echoes

A Journey Inside Mystic Journey's Kingdom of Mountains, Echoes September CD of the Month. For September's CD of the Month, we welcome back an old friend to the show, flutist Suzanne Teng, who has returned with her group, Mystic Journey. At the turn of the 21st century, Suzanne appeared a couple of times in the show, playing live from her Topanga Canyon home. She was on the show even before that playing live with the Angels of Venice. With Kingdom of Mountains, we remember why we loved her music so much back then. Suzanne Teng is classically trained but she took a left turn in the 90s and started playing flutes from around the world. The last time I was in her home she had a small room dedicated to flutes from around 50 different countries. She released a couple of beautifully crafted world fusion albums, Mystic Journey and Miles Beyond, the later a CD of the Month in 2004. Teng moved to Sante Fe shortly after that album and has barely been heard from since, but she's finally returned with a group called Mystic Journey (They were Suzanne Teng and Mystic Journey previously) that includes her husband, percussionist-plus Gilbert Levy, along with guitarist Dan Torres and bassist and dilruba player Jon Ossman. Together they have woven an album of serene moods and seductive world grooves, all topped by Teng's flutes. Teng doesn't really tap her flute arsenal for Kingdom of Mountains, concentrating mostly on bass and alto flutes. But she still makes them sound like voices coming from another land, as on the opener, "Subhalda," a name taken from the "Mahabharata" Indian epic. She weaves in like a seductress over subtle synth pads and a spare percussion groove, both from Levy. The rhythms get deeper as Levy brings in the melodic hang drum and Ossman twangs the dilruba. It's a bowed instrument from India he plays it pizzicato for a sitar effect. The title track, "Kingdom of Mountains," is the centerpiece of the album. The title comes from Teng and Levy's son, Miles, who came up with that name for their new Sante Fe home. It's a track that puts the journey into Mystic Journey. A slow build of saz and oud over a spare rhythm evolves into slow desert trot, with Teng playing a bass Native American flute against Levy's ambling udu drums and Ossman's rubbery electric bass. It's a trip into a desert mirage. Teng does deploy her world flutes on several tracks. "Delicate Rainbow Flower" features the Chinese dizi while "Yunnan", has the reedy flute sounds of the Chinese hulusi with three bamboo pipes stuck in a small gourd. This sound inspired one of the more upbeat and vibrant tracks on the album You'd think she'd up the mood on a track called "Midnight in Bamako", but instead it's a slinky walk through a lysergic nightclub, a haze in the air, slow grooves from instruments like the saz and trailing accents from the West African ngoni. This is a deep global chill track. There is a more atmospheric mood to Kingdom of Mountains than previous albums by Teng. Gilbert Levy does most of the synth programming and he goes beyond the usual clichéd patches that plague the genre. There are so many wonderful touches across this album. On "Home," Gilbert Levy plucks the saz, a lute from Turkey while also doubling Teng's alto flute lines on synths. You can really hear the way the drum programming interacts with the hang on "Home" and the two tracks that just feature Teng and Levy. On "" Teng dances her alto flute melody across a propulsive synth bass line, while the hang plays counter-melodies to Teng's flute solo. On record at least, they don't even need a band. Kingdom of Mountains is a more than welcome return from Suzanne Teng and Gilbert Levy. As Mystic Journey, they once again raise the bar of world fusion.

Echoes Podcast: Mystic Journey's Kingdom of Mountains - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Nights and Weekends in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

NIghts and Weekends in the Echoes Podcast Break-up records are like romance novels. There are too many of them and they are all pretty much the same. Every twenty-something singer comes in with tales of loss and broken hearts. Nights and Weekends are something else. They are a 40-something couple, author Jenny Hollowell and producer Daron Hollowell, who really have been through it all. And they sing all about it on their debut album, Music for Marriage. It's an atmospheric, moody album, but it isn't a bedroom soundtrack. They come in for a marriage counselling session on Echoes. Jenny Hollowell: Yeah, I think the other thing too is like there's real like places of anger on this record. I think that was part of the process of what we were going through. There were moments where it's just like I just want to burn everything Nights and Weekends' Music for Marriage isn't meant for setting the mood unless the mood is emotional wreckage. Hear their interview and the gorgeous, sultry dream pop music that they make together

Terje Rypdal Interview in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Celebrate Guitarist Terje Rypdal's 70th Birthday in Echoes Podcast. Norway's Terje Rypdal is the definitive modern guitarist, sculpting his sound through elaborate effects. Born on August 23, 1947, Rypdal would become a giant of the electric guitar. Through 60s rock bands and apprenticeships in groups led by George Russell and Jan Garbarek, through a string of solo albums for ECM records, Terje Rypdal blazed a path through electric stars with searing guitar leads. He's a veteran of ECM records with several albums out including lauded collaborations with Jan Garbarek, Jack Dejohnette and David Darling. Rypdal is also an orchestral composer with dozens of symphonic works and recordings. We interviewed him in 1996 in Molde, Norway near his home, and he took us through his career, from 60s pop to the orchestral avant-garde.

Terje Rypdal Interview in Echoes Podcast - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Interview with Yaima - Interview Podcast – Echoes

Echoes talks to New Age band Yaima about new album, OvO. New Age music has been surprisingly resistant to contemporary music trends, but a group called Yaima is changing that, mixing new age mysticism and lyrics, with world music touches and electronic dance music grooves. Strip away the new age imagery and you might set them alongside bands like Goldfrapp or Purity Ring. They recently released their second album, OvO. Pepper Proud, that's her real name, was born and raised in the Appalachian hills of West Virginia and that's the music she heard growing up. "Appalachian music is such a part of the culture; you go to a friend's house, sit on the porch, and play banjo, mandolin, and guitar, and you jam," Proud remembers. "That was my major influence and all these old Appalachian songs coming through my friends and my teachers there. Yeah, it was a way of life." But Pepper Proud isn't in Appalachia anymore. Physically, she resides in Washington State and spiritually, in a cosmic state. These days you're more likely to see her at transformational festivals rather than back porch jams. These are New Age style events like Burning Man, Symbiosis Gathering and Boom that fall somewhere between a rave and a yoga retreat. "Transformation festivals are a gathering for this culture that we're in. It's where we all gather and celebrate art, love, life, and what we all create together," reflects her partner, Masaru Higasa.. What Yaima creates is an enchanting music weaving Masaru's electronic grooves and ambiences, world music percussion from Jeff Kimes, and Pepper's mystical lyrics and ethereal voice. Pepper Proud weaves themes of ecology, world peace, and evolution into tales that sound like they were from an ancient time but are totally of the 21st century. Pepper considers herself a storyteller. "If you think about it in the way of storytelling," says Proud, "how Appalachian roots is all about passing on tradition and passing on stories, and how we're in a position now of changing that story and carrying on a new story, and passing these songs on and telling new stories so that people have new things to gravitate towards and to recycle and return into other things,". That's somewhat the theme of the albums title, OvO. "OvO means seed or egg, the beginning of something," Proud explains. "It means the crucial moment right before the crack of the seed, right before it begins to open." Masaru Higasa grew up in Okinawa and came to America when he was 21, about 12 years ago. He was already making electronic music under his own name. "Mainly my music is based off of drone music," Higasa enthuses. "The whole sound journey evolution is based off of the tamboura instrument or pads, which kind of puts you in that trance, and that's kind of basically what I work off of." He teamed up with Pepper Proud on her second solo album, which marked her transition from Appalachian folky to cosmic diva. Both musicians have worked in different forms of music therapy. Pepper Proud studied it in college and used it to open up people to singing. "I really believe that the human body has this instrument for a purpose and it's kind of my mission these days to help people rekindle that and find that again," says Proud. "That's kind of how I weave music therapy back in: just being with people one on one and helping them discover their instruments." Masaru lists "float guide" as one of his jobs. "I used to work at a float center on sensory deprivation tanks," explains Higasa. "Yeah, I used to guide people on how to release and relax into the float tank experience. I used to actually hold sound journeys while people floated and guide them through their whole float experience." It's a short step from that into heightened states of consciousness. Yaima look like they could be at a Grateful Dead show and their lyrics and songs have a gentle lysergic flow to them. But they're on the far side of the 60s generational divide. The distance between their experience and the 1960s can be heard when we talk about their song, "Our Game". I suggest it sounds like a modern version of the Timothy Leary slogan: "Turn on, tune in, and drop out." At first, both laugh, "What song is that?" Then, after I prompt them to Leary's famous phrase, Proud seems to remember and replies, "Oh, yeah. I mean it could be, it could be anything. It doesn't have to be a psychedelic experience to allow yourself to break through like that, but I do believe that there are medicines available to us and experiences available to us that can help us restructure the patterns that we might get stuck in or feel stuck in." "A lot of people do experience our music on psychedelics, for sure," maintains Higasa. "Yeah, at the festivals, it's definitely a common theme," concurs Proud. As Pepper Proud and Masaru Higasa might guide you in vocalizing or floating, Yaima consider themselves a soundtrack to a journey through your mind. "What really touches me when I'm on stage playing music and I look out into the crowd, I see people with their eyes closed," exudes Higasa. "If they have their eyes closed and they're going within themselves and on their own journey, that's what makes me most happy because I know they're really feeling the music. Something's going on; they're healing in their own way. And that's what its all about for me." "Yeah, a lot of times we'll look out into the crowd and people will just have their hands on their heart and we talk about it afterwards like that's why we do this," gushes Proud. Yaima, by the way, is a word from South America."Yaima was a word that meant "that which water runs through," Proud defines. "It means you can point to a river and say Yaima. You can point to a lake and say Yaima. You can point to a conduit and say Yaima. You can point to a human and say Yaima." Or you could go with the flow and point to OvO, the latest album by Yaima.

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