Midday on WYPR

Midday on WYPR

From WYPR - 88.1 FM Baltimore

From WYPR 88.1 FM in Baltimore. On Midday, Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall's talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylanders: the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine.More from Midday on WYPR »

Most Recent Episodes

One Man's Journey To Confront Racism Face-To-Face

Reaching across the aisle to engage with your enemy. It's a concept we hear politicians throw around but it's becoming increasingly less popular as our political discourse becomes more divisive and polarizing. For some, respectfully engaging with an enemy that seems fundamentally opposed to their very existence is impossible, but it's exactly what Daryl Davis has been doing for more than 25 years. Mr. Davis is a musician who's played with the likes of Little Richard and Chuck Berry. But, when he's not on stage, Mr. Davis, who is a black man, meets and befriends members of the Ku Klux Klan. This hobby started in 1983 when an audience member struck up a conversation with Mr. Davis after a gig. When the gentleman in the audience revealed that he was a member of the KKK, the conversation did not end and after years of being friends, that man dropped out of the Klan. In fact dozens of former KKK members have given up their robes as a result of their friendships with Mr. Davis.

The Midday News Wrap 2.17.17

During the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, Donald Trump attracted voters who yearned for disruption. As it concludes its first month, few would disagree that his administration has delivered on that promise. Big league. In a series of rambling perorations at his first solo press conference on February 16th, the President said, as he often does, a whole bunch of stuff that isn't true. He also offered several opinions that many people agree with: that CNN is bad, that Fox and Friends is good, and that he is making progress fixing "the terrible mess" he says he inherited on January 20 th . On our Midday News Wrap each Friday, Tom and a panel of keen political observers review some of the week's top news developments and try to separate the wheat from the chaff, and the facts from the fiction. Today's panel includes Stephanie Rawlings Blake , the former Mayor of Baltimore who's now a consultant at SRB & Associates and an analyst for ABC News; Liz Copeland, the founder of the Urban

Living Questions: Confronting Islamophobia

Today, another installment in our monthly series, Living Questions , in which we examine the role of religion in the public sphere. We're producing this series in partnership with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies. There's been a sharp rise in anti-Muslim violence in the United States over the past two years, which coincides with the divisive presidential campaign and election of Donald Trump. Negative perceptions of Muslims are nothing new. Nearly half of all Americans believe Islam is a faith more likely than others to encourage terrorism. These notions have been fueled by several high-profile terrorist attacks in Europe and the United States by self-proclaimed "jihadists," but they've also been advanced by a well-organized chorus of anti-Muslim rhetoric in the US that started long before President Donald Trump started campaigning on a temporary ban on all Muslim immigration to the United States. One week after he assumed office last month, he issued a

Rousuck's Review: Dickens' "Great Expectations" at Everyman Theatre

Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom with her regular Thursday review of local and regional stage productions. Today, she spotlights the ambitious new production of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations , now on stage at Everyman Theatre . Adapted from the 1860 classic by Gale Childs Daily and directed by Tazewell Thompson, Great Expectations is a faithful condensation of this enduring saga of identity, fate, sacrifice and generosity, and it draws brilliantly on the multi-role talents of its small cast. Great Expectations continues at Everyman Theatre through Sunday, March 5.

New Report Sets Guidelines For Genome Editing

*This edition of Midday was shortened to accommodate NPR's special coverage of President Trump's press conference with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Genome editing, that is the ability to make additions, deletions, and alterations to the genome of a human or animal, is not a new. Scientists have been experimenting with it in labs for a while to better understand the way some diseases and disabilities work. But now a new report released yesterday from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine sets international guidelines for genome editing. New editing tools like CRISPR have opened up the doors for more lab and clinical research projects. The scientists behind the report hope their guidelines will serve as a roadmap to help other scientists avoid the ethical concerns associated with gene editing.

Midday With Mayor Catherine Pugh

Today a conversation with Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh . Mayor Pugh took her post in December 2016 after a long career in Maryland politics, first as a Baltimore City Council member and later as a State Delegate, so she is no stranger to Baltimore's old problems. To date, According to the Baltimore Sun , 45 people have been killed in the city this year. What can be done to assure that a homicide a day isn't the new normal? When Mayor Pugh was elected she campaigned on a platform that included improving education, now Baltimore City Public Schools may have to layoff 1,000 teachers and cut arts and enrichment programs due to a $130 million budget deficit. What role will the Mayor play in ensuring a quality education for the city's young people?

The Plight of Syrian Refugees

The civil war in Syria has led to one of the worst humanitarian crises since World War II. Since the conflict began six years ago, nearly five million people have fled from Syria to Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt and Iraq. More than six million others have been displaced from their homes, but are unable to get out of Syria. A million people have requested asylum in Europe. The Obama Administration committed to placing 10,000 Syrian refugees in the US in 2016. Last month, President Trump tried to ban all travel to and from Syria indefinitely. That ban was overturned, at least for the moment, by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last Thursday night. Today, a conversation about what is happening on the ground, and what we might be able to do to help the millions of people who are in dire need of humanitarian assistance. Tom's guests today in Studio A are all deeply involved in the effort to help refugees. Bill O'Keefe is the Vice President for government relations and advocacy at Catholic

David Simon's Immigrant City

David Simon joins Tom in the studio. He needs no introduction in Baltimore, but a quick reminder for far-flung listeners: David is an author, writer and producer of the acclaimed TV series about criminal justice in Baltimore, The Wire , and many other projects, including Treme, Show Me a Hero , and the upcoming HBO drama, The Deuce . He's here today to tell us about City of Immigrants: A Night of Support , an event that he's organized in support of immigration and in opposition to the Trump Administration's proposed curbs on refugee admissions and travel from seven Muslim-majority nations. Tonight's event at Beth Am Synagogue in Reservoir Hill will include, in addition to remarks by David Simon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch, the activist DeRay Mckesson, City Health Commissioner Dr. Lena Wen and others, with music by singer/songwriter/actor Steve Earle . Proceeds from the event will be donated to The National Immigration Law Center, the Tahirih Justice Center, the

Midday News Wrap: 02.10.17

Today marks the end of the third week of the Trump administration, and there was no let-up in the controversies the new president is generating. A federal Appeals Court ruling last night upheld a lower court's stay on the president's executive order temporarily banning refugee admissions and travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. The President attacked the judges involved in that decision; his nominee to the Supreme Court called those attacks "demoralizing." Betsy DeVos was confirmed as the new Secretary of Education. Her confirmation was historic, for all the wrong reasons. Democrats convened at the Inner Harbor, struggling with a strategy to counter the Republicans' dominance in DC. And the city of Baltimore has begun the year more violently than in any year since the 1970s. Helping us sort out the week's news on today's News Wrap: White House correspondent Jenna Johnson of the Washington Post. She joins Tom on the line from the Washington Post studios in DC; on the phone is

Tube Talk: TV Tackles Trump

WYPR producers Bridget Armstrong and Jamyla Krempel join Tom for Tube Talk. Shows like Saturday Night Live , Full Frontal with Samantha Bee , and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert are tackling President Trump and his administration one episode at a time. We'll talk about how the presidency is informing television. And, BET's New Edition biopic, which chronicles the ups and downs of the R&B boy band, is the highest rated program the network has aired in five years. We'll talk about what made the film successful and other shows on the horizon.

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