RadioWest Podcast

RadioWest

From KUER 90.1

A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works.Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1. Join us at by emailing radiowest@kuer.org.More from RadioWest »

Most Recent Episodes

Sebastian Junger on Conflict and Coming Together

The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Monday, we're rebroadcasting a conversation with Junger about why we're stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. (Rebroadcast)

The Economic Value of Public Land

Friday we're asking whether the Outdoor Retailer Trade Show would leave Salt Lake City because of the public land agenda of state lawmakers. Peter Metcalf, the founder of the outdoor company Black Diamond, says the trade show should consider leaving if state leaders don't back off from their attempt to take ownership of public land. But these kinds of warnings have been made before. What's different this time, and what is the economic value of public land in Utah? Metcalf and others join us.

Through the Lens: Tower

On August, 1, 1966, a lone gunman opened fire from the top floor of a tower at the University of Texas at Austin. It was America's first mass school shooting, and civilians and law enforcement on the ground struggled to respond. When the gunshots were silenced, 16 people lay dead and dozens were wounded. In a new documentary film, director Keith Maitland revisits the events of that infamous day through the words of the people who lived it. Maitland joins us Thursday to talk about his film. It's called TOWER.

August Wilson and Fences

Wednesday, we're talking about August Wilson, one of the great American playwrights ... period. That doesn't need the qualifier that he was a black playwright. But his plays were about the black experience in this country, and one of his masterpieces was Fences. Denzel Washington's film version is now in theaters, and the stage version has just opened at Pioneer Theatre Company. We're taking the opportunity to talk about the heart breaking beauty of August Wilson's work.

The Gunning of America

Historian Pamela Haag says there's a mythology around American gun culture. The conventional wisdom is that since the Revolutionary War we've had some primal bond with our firearms. But Haag argues that our guns were once just another tool of everyday life, and that the gun industry convinced us we needed to be armed. In her latest book, she follows the rise of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and the marketing campaign she says created our gun culture. We spoke with Haag about the story.

A Conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich grew up in Sugar City, Idaho, and in the late 50s, she figured she would just "get married and have children." So it may surprise you to hear that she coined the phrase "well-behaved women seldom make history." Ulrich is a Mormon, a feminist, a Harvard professor, and a Pulitzer Prize-winner. She's dedicated her career to telling the stories of early American women and helping modern women find their voices. She's in Utah, and joins Doug on Monday.

Salt Lake City's Plan to Fight Homelessness

When Salt Lake City officials announced the proposed sites of four future homeless shelters, opposition from the public was swift and fierce. The new shelters are meant to help people get off the street, while also reducing crime and stress downtown. But residents near the proposed sites say they were cut out of the decision process and that the shelters will endanger their neighborhoods. Thursday, we're examining the crisis of homelessness in Salt Lake City and the new plan to address it.

The Science of Fat

Body fat is a source of shame for many people, something to be hidden, fought, and burned away. But fat, says the biochemist Sylvia Tara, isn't just unsightly blubber, it's an essential and deeply misunderstood organ that's vital to our existence. It enables our reproductive organs, strengthens our immune system, protects us from disease, and may even help us live longer. In a new book, Tara explores the science behind our least appreciated organ, and she joins us Wednesday to talk about it.

The Gardener and the Carpenter

The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It's too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don't work like that. In a new book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. (Rebroadcast)

Pinpoint

Even if you didn't use GPS to find your way around town today, there's every chance it touched your life. The Global Positioning System is now integrated into almost every part of modern existence. It helps land planes, route cell phone calls, predict the weather, grow food, and regulate global finance. Our guest, Greg Milner, has written a book that traces the history of GPS. He also examines the frightening costs of our growing dependence on it. (Rebroadcast)

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