The Nature of Things

From WRVO

For over 20 years John Weeks brought central New York The Nature of Things, a weekly commentary on nature. The series was a regular feature on WRVO during Morning Edition on Fridays. John retired from writing the commentary in June of 2006. WRVO will release an episode from The Nature of Things archives every week.More from The Nature of Things »

Most Recent Episodes

The Goldfinch

In this archived broadcast from August 31, 1990, John Weeks talks about the hatching season of birds. He goes into detail on the Goldfinch and how they play a role in the environment. He also talks about the uniqueness of this bird and how and why it is different from others.

Highways Of Silk

In this archived broadcast from May 18, 1990, John Weeks talks about the highways of silk. He goes into detail about the Tent Caterpillars in Baltimore Woods. He talks about what they eat and how they attack trees but don't kill them. These are brought about by moths. Hes goes into detail about the birth of these Caterpillars and their lifespan.

Watching a Wetland....Work

In this archived broadcast from July 3, 1987, John Weeks talks about wetlands and how important they are to the environment. He goes into detail about what a wetland is and how wild life react in wetlands. He also talks about the fish populations within wetlands.

Golden Pastures of July

In this archived broadcast from July 5, 1991, John Weeks talks about the month of July and how summer is established in July. He talks about the trees and plants and how they change in July. He talks about many different and unique colors that appear in the month of July and how those colors change and develop on different types of flowers.

Some Strange Tastes in Birds and Insects

In this archived broadcast from July 26, 1991, John Weeks talks about how birds and insects are great nesters and how they are the greatest architects. He speaks about mostly birds and how they build their birds nest how they are all unique and different. Every bird and insect has a different taste so depending on the type of bird or insect the nest or "home" is different and Weeks goes into detail about that. 

Abundance at Sunrise

In this archived broadcast from  July, 6, 1990 John Weeks talks about the sunrise and how he gets up early to look at the birds. He talks about how the sunrise is the most important part of the day and what he enjoys about it. He narrates his morning and the birds that he seeing such as the sparrows that nest by his home.

Reclaiming the Sounds of the Forest

In this archived broadcast from June 14, 1991, John Weeks talks about the sounds of nature. He goes into detail about how the sounds of the forest give us an idea about what is going on in nature and in the forest. without the sound of birds, animals and the wind we loose the important of nature. He talks about how it is hard for him to hear the sounds of nature and he talks about how he needs a hearing aid to hear the sounds in the woods.

Helping The Bluebird with John Rogers

In this archived broadcast from March 20, 1987, John Weeks talks with John Rodgers who is co founder of the Upstate Bluebird Society. He interviews Rodgers on bluebird boxes and why they are making them. They talk about how important the nest boxes are to the environment and the Bluebirds. He speaks about how not only Bluebird's use these nests but many other birds do as well.

Lessons in the Lakes

In this archived broadcast from August 3, 1984, John Weeks talks about his anniversary trip to Skaneateles  Lake. He says that the lake was so clean and pure. He goes into great detail about the lake and the people and history that surrounds it. He talks about how all of the New York waterways and lakes differ from each other.

Listening To The Plans of the Birds

In this archived broadcast from May 25, 1990, John Weeks talks about he talks about how the birds of the spring prepare for the summer and how they nest. He also talks about the song of the birds. He goes into detail about a time that he was bird watching and examined certain birds.

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