KUOW's RadioActive

KUOW's RadioActive

From KUOW

RadioActive trains the next generation of public media makers. Tune in every month to hear a new collection of stories about the issues that matter to young people in the Northwest.More from KUOW's RadioActive »

Most Recent Episodes

How do Seattle youth feel about a President Trump? Disbelief, stress, and for some, relief

"The day of the election, I felt like I was not wanted in this country. Period." "Trump actually, I believe, cares about people." "It is real. This is not a nightmare." The whole country is talking about Donald Trump's upcoming inauguration. But did you ever hear from the youth about what a President Trump means to them ? In this podcast, w e hear from Somali Muslim college students, a high schooler that supports Donald Trump, and more. Plus, RadioActive's Nina Tran asks her Chinese Vietnamese immigrant mom why she voted for Trump. Googling "how to talk to your parents about Trump" didn't make this tough conversation easier.

How do Seattle youth feel about a President Trump? Disbelief, stress, and for some, relief

A Seattle Cherokee asked what Standing Rock protesters want to say to the police

KUOW's RadioActive youth producer Rachel Lam was on the front lines at Standing Rock, North Dakota last week, where thousands of people are protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. The Army Corps of Engineers says they have to leave their biggest camp by Monday, December 5. Lam, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, says she went because she "felt compelled to witness the largest gathering of Native nations in history rallying for treaty and human rights." She watched protesters, who call themselves water protectors, try to pray at Lakota burial sites blocked by law enforcement officers. Lam asked some of those protesters - Cheyenne, Gros-Ventre, Athabaskan, Diné, Shoshone, Spokane, Blackfeet, Lakota, Paiute, Choctow and non-Native people - what they want to say to law enforcement. Listen to what they said: RadioActive Youth Media is KUOW's program for youth age 16 to 20ish. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

A Seattle Cherokee asked what Standing Rock protesters want to say to the police

What does a booming Seattle mean for young people?

By definition, growing pains are the problems that are experienced as something grows larger or more successful — and there's no doubt that Seattle has been experiencing that in recent years. But has this city really become more successful? And what do these changes mean for young people?

Yes, I'm from China. And yes those people are my parents

When I was younger I was open about being adopted. During show-and-tell in preschool, I shared moon cakes with my classmates to celebrate Chinese New Year. My parents were with me to explain to everyone that I was born in China and adopted at 10 months old.

The scariest thing about heroin? 'You're gonna love it'

When she was 10 years old, Alyssa Gaudinier found the spot where her parents hid the alcohol. The moment it touched her lips, she was addicted to that escape.

They chased him, shot at him, but he still managed to bring his family to America

Recently, my whole family got together to celebrate my sister's graduation. Everyone was very excited. But my family wasn't always all together here in Seattle. My uncle Omar Ali is responsible for us being together at this exact moment.

They chased him, shot at him, but he still managed to bring his family to America

I was homeless and my life was trash. Then this Seattle family took me in

This is me and my family. My mom, my dad, brother, and sister. (Not pictured: cats.) Six months ago, they were just strangers. And six months ago, I was homeless and couch surfing. I worked about 35 hours a week at Panda Express while attending school full time. I was a junior in high school, 16 years old.

I was homeless and my life was trash. Then this Seattle family took me in

My dad's Cinderella story: Finding love in Somalia

My dad's life story is kind of like Cinderella's. My dad, Abdul-Basit Hassan, grew up without a mom, worked for an evil relative and found his princess in the least expected way.

Queer youth, you'll belong at this old Seattle house

"Hiiiii!" I open the magenta door to the Lambert House, a place on Seattle's Capitol Hill where queer youth are free to be themselves.

Depression in 7th grade: 'I want to die but if I could get help that would be awesome'

Sam, 17, has a bright smile and is always making her friends laugh. But in seventh grade, Sam struggled. She was trying to figure out her role in the social ladder, and her parents were fighting, and she was feeling extremely sad.

Depression in 7th grade: 'I want to die but if I could get help that would be awesome'

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