St. Louis on the Air

St. Louis on the Air

From St. Louis Public Radio

Discussion/call-in show about issues important to St. Louisans.More from St. Louis on the Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Documenting the history of Kirkwood's Meacham Park community

On Friday's St. Louis on the Air , we heard about a collaboration between Webster Arts, Springboard to Learning, the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis and Nipher Middle School, to document the history of the Meacham Park community in Kirkwood. Joining the program: Jeanne Vogel, Executive Director, Webster Arts Marsha Conlon, Director of Education, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis Here's how you can share your story . Listen to the discussion: St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards , Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Behind the Headlines: Uncovering the local connection to the Dakota Access Pipeline

On Friday, St. Louis on the Air goes "Behind the Headlines" to discuss the top stories of the week with those who can bring a little more in-depth knowledge to them. On this week's program, we discussed a story about the local connection to the Dakota Access Pipeline that you can find 75 miles east of St. Louis. Joining the program was St. Louis Public Radio reporter Mary Delach Leonard, who reported on Patoka, Illinois, the city in where the Dakota Access Pipeline ends. The story: End of the line: We visit the Southern Illinois towns where the Dakota Access Pipeline ends Listen to the discussion here: St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards , Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Behind the Headlines: Uncovering the local connection to the Dakota Access Pipeline

Euphrates Institute opens a chapter in St. Louis to promote empathetic discourse

On Friday's St. Louis on the Air , guest host Steve Potter was joined by Jessica Gans Wilder, the founder and CEO of Euphrates Institute. She'll discuss the organization's mission to promote peace through understanding and about the group's new St. Louis-based chapter. Related Event What: Turn the "Other" Into a Brother When: Friday, Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. Where: First Congregational Church of Webster Groves United Church of Christ More information . St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards , Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Euphrates Institute opens a chapter in St. Louis to promote empathetic discourse

The legacy of Japanese American internment, 75 years after the executive order for it was signed

Sunday, February 19 marks 75 years since President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 in 1942 , which cleared the way for the internment of Japanese Americans from the West Coast of the United States during World War II. By June of 1942, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forced to leave behind their belongings, property and livelihoods to be relocated and incarcerated in internment camps across the country. During that time, some Japanese Americans were able to find shelter at inland university programs that would sponsor them away from the internment camps. One such institution was Washington University in St. Louis. In 1944, when the internment orders were lifted , many Japanese Americans who were interned in camps in Arkansas came to St. Louis in search of a new life. On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air with guest host Stephanie Lecci, we devoted our entire program to looking back at this dark period of American history. We heard from several guests with personal and

The legacy of Japanese American internment, 75 years after the executive order for it was signed

Noted St. Louis architect recounts incredible journey from Japanese American internment to Wash U

If you don't know Richard (Dick) Henmi by name, and you probably should, you definitely know one of his most iconic contributions to St. Louis' architectural assembly: the so-called 'flying saucer' building in Council Plaza off of Grand Boulevard. Henmi designed that building in 1967 . But the winding story behind what brought him to St. Louis goes back much farther. His journey started in 1942, when his family was forced from their home in California to live in a Japanese American internment camp . On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air , Henmi shared his incredible story as a 17-year-old in Fresno in 1942, leaving the internment camp for architecture studies at Washington University in St. Louis. But that's not all: while studying at Wash U, he was drafted into the military, went to officer candidate school and was eventually given the duty of transporting German POWs in the United States back to Germany after World War II ended in 1945. Related: The legacy of Japanese American

Noted St. Louis architect recounts incredible journey from Japanese American internment to Wash U

Tax season is upon us — here are your questions, answered ahead of that April 18 deadline

Except for the select few of you who have already filed your tax return, you may have started scratching your head and scrambling ahead of that April 18 deadline. Tax season is upon us! On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air , guest host Maria Altman was joined by CPA Lance Weiss who is with the St. Louis tax and accounting firm SFW Partners, LLC , about tax tips you should take into account this season. Of the 152 million people who filed tax returns last year, about 111 million received a return back on their taxes for too much withheld. The average refund was $2800. Weiss answered questions from small business owners, retirees, and working individuals on ways to ensure you're getting the return you should be getting. He also pointed out important forms people should keep an eye out for, like tax forms to prove you have health insurance, either through the Health Insurance Marketplace or through your employer. While there aren't changes to the tax code this year, Weiss also discussed a

Tax season is upon us — here are your questions, answered ahead of that April 18 deadline

Media literacy, honesty and documentary film: True False Film Fest marks 14th year in mid-Missouri

In a "post-truth" era of "alternative facts," the importance of media literacy, and questioning why different media is made the way that it is, has reemerged in American society. Such media literacy values are baked into True/False Film Fest , a four-day mid-Missouri festival devoted solely to documentary filmmaking. This year the festival will take place from March 2-5 and screen some 35 nonfiction films that urge audiences to define the line between real and fake. In addition to films, the festival also includes speakers , art installation s and musical busking from bands coming from throughout the country. It's the festival's 14 th year. In its first year, about 1,500 people attended. In 2016, nearly 50,000 people attended. About 40 percent of audience attendance is from outside of mid-Missouri, with folks coming from across the state. About 15 percent of attendees are from outside of Missouri entirely, coming from filmmaking havens like New York, Los Angeles and London. This year,

Media literacy, honesty and documentary film: True False Film Fest marks 14th year in mid-Missouri

Redrawing boundaries — real and imagined — with digital artist Jer Thorp at the St. Louis Map Room

Take any given day of the week: What route do you take to work? How do you get to the grocery store? What secret, traffic-free pathways do you take to get to school? Do you remember how you decided which way to go? What to avoid? Have you thought about what subtle factors influenced those decisions? These questions are all foundational to a new collaboration between the New York-based Office of Creative Research , St. Louis-based Center of Creative Arts (COCA) and the St. Louis Public Schools called the St. Louis Map Room . Noted digital artist and designer Jer Thorp is the lead designer of the project. You may know him from his work with the National September 11 Memorial and Museum . His data algorithm made it possible for the names of those who died in the attacks to be placed "meaningfully adjacent" to people who had connections in life. On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air , Thorp spoke with Brent Jones , St. Louis Public Radio's data visual specialist, about his work with the St.

Redrawing boundaries — real and imagined — with digital artist Jer Thorp at the St. Louis Map Room

What's the science behind that lovey dovey feeling? A Valentine's Day exploration

Psychologist Sandra Langeslag runs a laboratory at the University of Missouri-St. Louis dedicated to finding out how love works int he brain. On Tuesday, Valentine's Day, she joined us to discuss the science behind those lovey dovey feelings you feel. Related: To an UMSL psychologist, love is just a state of mind St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards , Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

What's the science behind that lovey dovey feeling? A Valentine's Day exploration

The refugee perspective you rarely hear: Grace Jo shares her story of defection from North Korea

As a little girl in North Korea, Grace Jo lived through one of the worst famines in North Korean history. While the official death toll from the notoriously most restrictive authoritarian country in the world is unknown, it is estimated that from 1994 to 1998, anywhere between 600,000 and 2.5 million people died of hunger . Included in that number were Jo's grandmother and two younger brothers. Jo's father was tortured and starved to death in a North Korean jail after he was arrested while searching the country for food. On Monday's St. Louis on the Air , Jo shared the story of her childhood, how she and her sister and mother escaped North Korea and were eventually resettled in the United States. In 2013, Jo became an American citizen and helps run the North Korean human rights advocacy organization NKinUSA alongside her sister. Jo was in Missouri last week for the unveiling of the MU Institute for Korean Studies , which was started by Professors Sheena Greitens and Harrison Kim to

The refugee perspective you rarely hear: Grace Jo shares her story of defection from North Korea

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