St. Louis on the Air

St. Louis on the Air

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Missouri's candidates for governor run parallel campaigns: one positive, one negative

On television, Missouri's two major candidates for governor — Democrat Chris Koster and Republican Eric Greitens — pretend their rival doesn't exist. Both men are running pleasant biographical ads that highlight the best of their respective personal and professional backgrounds. Koster, currently the Missouri attorney general, emphasizes his experience as a prosecutor, and his commitment to fiscal discipline. Greitens, who is making his first bid for public office, recounts his past as a Navy SEAL, and the success of a nonprofit he helped establish, called The Mission Continues, to help returning veterans.

Missouri's candidates for governor run parallel campaigns: one positive, one negative

Photos: On the National Park Service's 100th birthday, we look to ways to sustain its future

August 25th marks the 100th birthday of the National Park Service. In observance of the anniversary, St. Louis on the Air talked with those who have had experience inside the parks about what exactly could be done to ensure the parks' sustainability (financial, environmental and otherwise) amid calls to privatize the parks. Joining the program was Bill Lowry, a professor of political science with Washington University, worked as a seasonal park ranger at Yosemite National Park. He also wrote the book "Repairing Paradise, The Restoration of Nature in America's National Parks." Mike Owens, lawyer and former KSDK reporter, also joined the show by phone from Glacier National Park, where he has spent the summer driving a bright red "jammer" up and down the park's famed Going-to-the-Sun Road. We also put out a call for listeners' favorite photos of the parks earlier this week. If you're looking for some national park travel inspiration, you can click through the slideshow above to see some

Photos: On the National Park Service's 100th birthday, we look to ways to sustain its future

Have your kids recently left the nest for college? We have some tips for letting go

It's that time of year again: kids are heading back to school ... unless they aren't and are instead breaking new ground on a college campus. While this time in a young adult's life can be scary, it also holds significant fears on the part of the parent. On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the transition from high school to college with parents in mind. Joining the program was Karen Levin Coburn, author of "Letting Go: A Parent's Guide to Understanding the College Years" and senior consultant in residence at Washington University. St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Have your kids recently left the nest for college? We have some tips for letting go

100 years ago, St. Louis played a large part in the women's suffrage movement

On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air, we looked back on a movement 100 years ago in St. Louis when 3,000 women marched to remind Democratic National Convention attendees that women still didn't have the right to vote. Kathleen Farrell, president of the League of Women Voters of Metro St. Louis, and Rebecca Now, historian and executive director of the Webster Groves/Shrewsbury area Chamber of Commerce, joined the program to discuss the significance of the event. Related Event What: Celebrate the Vote FestivalWhen: Saturday, Sept. 3 from 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.Where: St. Louis Public Library Central Library, 1301 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 6310More information. St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

100 years ago, St. Louis played a large part in the women's suffrage movement

Legal Roundtable — Election 2016 and changes to come

On Monday, St. Louis on the Air's Legal Roundtable returned to discuss pressing legal issues of the day. We were joined in studio by: William Freivogel, J.D., Professor, School of Journalism, Southern Illinois University – CarbondaleJennifer Joyce, J.D., St. Louis Circuit AttorneyMark Smith, J.D., Associate Vice Chancellor of Students, Washington University Here are some of the issues they discussed: 78th District voter fraud caseKim Gardner's election to St. Louis Circuit AttorneyMissouri Gov. Jay Nixon ordered to serve as a public defenderRod Blagojevich clemency petitionMissourians could vote on 4 ballot items — if the courts don't nix themSuit takes aim at 'debtors' prisons' in St. Louis County citiesSupreme Court of the United States decisionsSt. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to

Behind the Headlines: As Aetna pulls out of Missouri's health care exchange, what's next?

This week, health care company Aetna (in Missouri: Coventry) announced it would pull out from Missouri's Affordable Care Act health exchange next year, leaving Missouri residents fewer choices for health insurance. On Friday's "Behind the Headlines," St. Louis on the Air will take a look at the background behind this decision, how it impacts people in our region, and the implications for the future of the ACA. As the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported, analysts believe this move is a way for Aetna to pressure the U.S. government to stop blocking the health care giant's merger with Humana. Related: Aetna CEO To Justice Department: Block Our Deal And We'll Drop Out Of Obamacare Saint Louis University law professor Sidney Watson joined host Don Marsh alongside Tim Greaney, a SLU law professor and co-director of the Center for Health Law Studies at the university. "Concentration, too few competitors, really makes a difference," said Greaney. "There's a mountain of economic evidence that

Behind the Headlines: As Aetna pulls out of Missouri's health care exchange, what's next?

Fried rice for breakfast? Move over cronut, here are the most out-of-the-box St. Louis food trends

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live. Remember when the cronut was a thing ... you know, the croissant-doughnut pastry hybrid? Well, move over cronut and hello sambal, raclette and fried rice for breakfast! Those are just a few of the latest out-of-the-box food trends that have made their way to the St. Louis area. Here to help explain these trends for this month's edition of Sound Bites on St. Louis on the Air was Catherine Klene and Meera Nagarajan, the managing editor and art director, respectively, for Sauce Magazine. "St. Louis is definitely trending when it comes to, particularly, the drink scene," Klene told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. "Our cocktail programs are nationally recognized as are our beer and brewing scene." And, lest we not forget food trends, Nagarajan said St. Louis has a lot of creative people who are doing interesting things. "Other people do take notice," she

Fried rice for breakfast? Move over cronut, here are the most out-of-the-box St. Louis food trends

From 'maximum silliness' with a Donald Trump musical to serious drama, St. Lou Fringe returns

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live. St. Lou Fringe Festival is back for a fifth year, running Aug. 19-27 in Grand Center, and features everything "avant-garde, independent and brand-new" that "you wouldn't see in other theaters here in St. Louis," said Matthew Kerns, the festival's new executive director. This year's Fringe features acts from Colorado, Nashville, as well as those native to St. Louis. All the acts are one hour or under. This festival will also mark festival founder Em Piro's last. You can listen to a wonderful Cut & Paste podcast interview with her here. "We are a home for ideas that can take root," Kerns said. "We are a home for anything from dance to slam poetry to puppetry to family stuff to micro theater." Kerns, who also founded Drama Club STL, was joined on St. Louis on the Air by two writers whose work will be featured at the festival this year: Elizabeth Townsend

From 'maximum silliness' with a Donald Trump musical to serious drama, St. Lou Fringe returns

In 1904, St. Louis hosted the first Olympics on American soil. It was kind of a mess.

As the Rio 2016 Olympics begin to wind down, it is worth remembering that St. Louis once played host to the Olympics: the 1904 Olympics, the first to be held on U.S. soil — and they were a mess. Doping, shameful "Anthropology Days" competitions among "savages" and minimal international participation were a recipe for a games that the Wall Street Journal once dubbed "Comedic, Disgraceful And 'Best Forgotten.'" Ironically, St. Louis wasn't even supposed to host the 1904 Olympics. As Sharon Smith, Curator of Civic and Personal Identity at the Missouri History Museum, relayed it on Thursday's St. Louis on the Air: "St. Louis took those Olympics from Chicago." Chicago had originally won the bid to host the Summer Olympics. The people behind the Louisiana Purchase Expedition, aka the World's Fair, didn't want two international events to be held at the same time and made the case that the Olympics should be combined with the fair's planned sporting events. Pierre de Coubertin, who created the

In 1904, St. Louis hosted the first Olympics on American soil. It was kind of a mess.

St. Louis-based author Ridley Pearson takes a stand against poaching in Africa with 'White Bone'

St. Louis-based author Ridley Pearson has written over 50 suspense and adventure novels but his latest, "White Bone," is tackling an issue that is close to him: illegal wildlife poaching in Africa. The book features familiar characters, John Knox and Grace Chu of Pearson's "Risk Agent" series, but this time their professional relationship becomes a bit more personal. "It sounds so snobby to say 'the characters write your book,' but in so many ways the characters write your book," Pearson said. "Especially Grace Chu, I've become incredibly fond of and have felt her appreciation of Knox go a bit beyond the professional, although she has never voiced it. In 'White Bone,' I was looking for a vehicle to bring them close together by pushing them apart." The premise of the book is this: Chu contacts Knox warning that her cover may have been exposed in Kenya while on assignment. Knox must retrace her steps while navigating the world of illegal poaching and the underground AIDS vaccine trade.

St. Louis-based author Ridley Pearson takes a stand against poaching in Africa with 'White Bone'

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