KPLU News Podcast

KPLU News Podcast

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Washington Environmental Groups Set Legislative Agenda For 2017 Session

Each year, as lawmakers get to work in Olympia, the state's largest environmental groups agree on legislative priorities. This session, the Washington Environmental Council and the Washington Conservation Voters are focused on water rights, oil transportation safety and cleaning up toxics. About 23 groups set the agenda for the Environmental Priorities Coalition. Topping their list this session is a recent decision from the state Supreme Court that says new housing development can only be approved when it won't take too much water from existing homes, farms and rivers. The coalition's lobbyist, Clifford Traisman, says it's clear that balancing water needs will be a priority of the Legislature this year. "And we would like to be part of the solution and be part of the discussion, so we can have development, but do so in a salmon-friendly way," he said. The other two priorities have to do with making sure there is adequate funding for environmental laws. First and foremost, Trasiman says

Washington Environmental Groups Set Legislative Agenda For 2017 Session

Women's Marchers Talk About Keeping Their Movement Alive, Long After Trump's Inauguration Fades

Saturday's women's march drew more than 100,000 people into the streets of Seattle, just one day after President Donald Trump took office. But as time goes on, protest movements tend to fade. So knkx reporters Will James and Warren Langford asked marchers how they plan to keep up their momentum — and incorporate their activism into their daily lives — long after the frenetic moment of Trump's inauguration has passed. "In the midterm elections, for example, I'm actually going to phone bank and go knock on doors this time, instead of considering my vote to be all that I can do," said one participant, Lynne Anderson. Here's more from some of the marchers:

Women's Marchers Talk About Keeping Their Movement Alive, Long After Trump's Inauguration Fades

I-90 Closures Screw Up More Than Your Ski Vacation

When a major thoroughfare closes for bad weather – like Interstate 90 at Snoqualmie Pass – it's more than an inconvenience. It might put a damper on your ski vacation, sure, but did you know many things headed to your store shelves might come to a screeching halt? Most of the time, Washington-grown goods like hay, lentils and onions make their way in trucks across I-90 from Eastern Washington before they're shipped all over the world. That's just the export side. There's tons of stuff going the other direction. "You name it — anything from toys to garments — and that's what people don't realize is, a lot of stuff is imported and needs to go over that road, and if it's closed, things aren't going anywhere," said Shelley Moine of International Freight Systems , a local freight forwarding company that moves products around the globe. According to the Port of Seattle, four in 10 jobs in Washington are dependent on the import-export business. When weather is too severe to navigate the pass,

Unpacking Government: How Do The Branches Of Government Interact With Each Other?

We learn in school that the three branches of government — the legislative, the executive, and the judicial — are designed to provide checks and balances on each other. To understand what that looks like, a good place to start is the Washington State Legislature, which is being held in contempt by the state Supreme Court for failing to fund basic education. McCleary v. State The state Supreme Court and the legislature first clashed over education in 1978 during Seattle School District No. 1 v. State . That ruling determined that it's the Legislature's job to define and fund basic education under Article IX, Section 1 of the state constitution : It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders, without distinction or preference on account of race, color, caste, or sex. Fast forward to 2007, when Stephanie and Matthew McCleary along with a host of school districts, teachers, and unions first sued the State of

Unpacking Government: How Do The Branches Of Government Interact With Each Other?

Seattle Women's Marchers On How To Burst Political Bubbles And Bridge Cultural Divides

The Seattle women's march on Saturday was a massive outpouring of frustration — and show strength for the forces opposing President Donald Trump. But some marchers acknowledged it did very little to bridge the deepening political and cultural divide in America — nor was it really intended to. "This particular march is about healing ourselves as women," said one participant, Evelyn Dickinson. Once the Womxn's March on Seattle was over, economic and social chasms remained between liberal cities like Seattle and places like Grays Harbor County, where Trump won a majority of votes on Election Day. Some of the marchers told knkx reporters Will James and Warren Langford about how they hoped to reach people who weren't at the demonstration and don't share their worldview. "We live in a bubble here," said marcher Kimberly Buchanan. "An economic bubble." Hear more from some of the march's participants:

Seattle Women's Marchers On How To Burst Political Bubbles And Bridge Cultural Divides

LineUp Plays An Art Of Jazz Concert At Seattle Art Museum

This week on Jazz Northwest, we're featuring LineUp in concert at the Seattle Art Museum. The quartet was formed in 2015 and debuted at the Ballard Jazz Festival that same year. Co-led by pianist and vocalist Dawn Clement and saxophonist Mark Taylor, LineUp has also played at the Earshot Jazz Festival and a monthly series at Tula's in Seattle. The quartet is completed by Michael Glynn on bass and Byron Vannoy on drums. All four members of the group are also composers and this concert includes original music as well as jazz classics by Lennie Tristano and Thelonious Monk. The Art of Jazz series is coordinated by Earshot Jazz and presented on the second Thursday of each month at the Seattle Art Museum from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. The concerts are free and open to the public in the Brotman Forum. The next concert in the series will feature the Barça Band led by Adam Kessler and Phil Sparks on March 9. Jazz Northwest is recorded and produced by Jim Wilke exclusively for 88.5 knkx and knkx.org .

Flip The Script: Sound Effect, Episode 93

This week on Sound Effect , we bring you stories that flip the script. We'll hear stories of reversing the typical expectations in a situation. Grays Harbor Grays Harbor, a part of the state that is known for being true-blue Democrat, voted for Donald Trump . It was the first time the county went Republican since 1928, back when Herbert Hoover was elected. Marriage Myths Stephanie Coontz is a marriage and family history expert at the Evergreen State College. She's the author of many books on relationships and marriage, including "The Way We Never Were." Coontz has spent decades studying the history of marriage and says most of the ideas we have about that institution are completely backwards . My Mom Back Then What if you could meet your mom or dad at the same age you are now. What would it be like? Sound Effect producer Allie Ferguson got that chance in a strange way. Connecting Transgender Men Telling the world its perception of you is wrong — and to say the way you see yourself is

In Grays Harbor County, A Crack Emerges In The Blue Wall

The last time Grays Harbor County voted for a Republican was in 1928, when Herbert Hoover was elected — that is, until last year when it went for Donald J. Trump. At one time, Grays Harbor was an economic powerhouse. Tim Quigg grew up there. He says back then just about anyone could get a job that paid well. "Guys in the plywood mill, they'd make, you know, eleven bucks and hour. Back in '73, or whatever it was, it was a lot; an engineer was making five," said Quigg. "The jobs were union wages, had benefits —retirement. They had meal tickets. Whether you're in a cannery, a fishing boat, a plywood mill — everything." But over the last 30 years, a number of economic factors, including federal environmental regulations put in place to protect the northern spotted owl, resulted in lost jobs, closed mills and forests sealed off from logging. The community continues to struggle with an unemployment rate that hovers around 8 percent. More than half the children in public schools are on free

Everything We Think We Know About Love And Marriage Is Backwards

Stephanie Coontz is a marriage and family history expert at the Evergreen State College. She's the author of many books on relationships and marriage, including "The Way We Never Were". Coontz has spent decades studying the history of marriage and says most of the ideas we have about that institution are completely backwards. In this conversation with Sound Effect producer Kevin Kniestedt, she started with one of the biggest myths of all: that traditional marriages rely on a man to support the family. Coontz also shared how historically, marriages were not based on love, but on arrangements to benefit the family. Families from all classes were looking to improve their current situation, and by having their child marry in to a family of a greater status, they, in turn would benefit. Coontz also shared some misconceptions about modern day relationships, as well as how parents have to return the focus to each other after the child has left the nest. She wraps up the conversation by

Eavesdropping On My Mom In Her 20s: How Old Tapes Reveal A Unique Friendship

One big way to flip the script is to mess with the traditional parent-child dynamic. For many, it can seem like parents are these older beings with no life before their children were born. In modern parenting especially, parents don't appear to even have a life when you're a kid. But what if you could meet your mom or dad at a younger age? Maybe even the same age you are now? What would it be like? What would that person be like? Sound Effect producer Allie Ferguson got that chance in a strange way after discovering old mini-cassette tapes her mom made in the 1990s. The tapes document Ferguson's mom, Polly Story-Lebl, on a road trip with her best friend, Rachel McArthur. The two are traveling through Nebraska joking and goofing around before surprising McArthur's mother at a Tupperware party. Ferguson and her mom, Polly Story-Lebl, are close but listening in on these tapes was a surreal experience for them both. It illuminated the unique relationship Story-Lebl had with her best friend

Eavesdropping On My Mom In Her 20s: How Old Tapes Reveal A Unique Friendship

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