KCRW's Which Way, L.A.?

KCRW's Which Way, L.A.?

From KCRW

Support KCRW's public radio podcasts. Join online at KCRW.com or call 800-600-5279. Award-winning moderator Warren Olney leads lively, thoughtful and provocative discussion on the issues Southern Californians care about. Which Way, L.A.? draws from newsmakers around Los Angeles, the state, North America, and from around the world to present all sides of our focus issues.More from KCRW's Which Way, L.A.? »

Most Recent Episodes

Which Way, LA? The Question that Won't Go Away

23 years ago, the fires of the Rodney King riots were burning and the sirens wailing when KCRW first asked, WWLA? We've been through fires, floods, earthquakes and massive social, cultural and economic change. While this is the last program titled WWLA? the question still needs to be asked. We talk with a group of important and thoughtful people about what LA has become and about the challenges to be faced in the future?as we continue.

Listen to the Episode

Then and Now: Is LA Still the Car Capital of the World?

Urban planners got some bad news today. Ridership on public transit in Southern California is on the decline, despite the billions being spent in recent years to build light rail and subway lines. Why aren't more drivers leaving their cars at home, as traffic gets more congested than ever? Meantime, there's a shortage of money to repair aging roads, bridges and other parts of the infrastructure. We look at the impact on the state's economy.

Listen to the Episode

Does California Have a Double Standard for the Public's Protection?

Porter Ranch and Vernon are mirror images of each other. In one, schools have been closed and thousands of residents are being moved away by the polluter?just months after a natural gas leak was discovered. In the other, residents complained for years about health risks to school children from exposure to lead and arsenic from a battery recycling plant? until the federal government finally stepped in.

Listen to the Episode

Is 'Warfare' a Thing of the Past at the LAPD?

Video of police misconduct wasn?t as common 25 years ago as it is today. The spectacle of LAPD officers beating Rodney King was a wake-up call, but didn?t persuade a jury in Simi Valley. When the cops received not-guilty verdicts, the city exploded. We hear from veteran officers who say they?ve changed. What about their tactics? Have they gained the trust of marginalized communities and people of color?

Listen to the Episode

City Hall: Then and Now

In the 23 years Which Way, LA? has been on the air, there have been five mayors of Los Angeles: Tom Bradley, Richard Riordan, James Hahn, Antonio Villaraigosa and Eric Garcetti. Each has served at a different moment in a process of continual change.

Listen to the Episode

The City of LA Pays Millions to Wrongfully Convicted Men

The City of Los Angeles will pay $24 million for the wrongful murder convictions of two men who spent years of their lives in prison because of proven misconduct by the LAPD. The City Attorney says going to court would cost even more.

Listen to the Episode

What's Behind the Yosemite Name Changes?

The Ahwahnee Hotel is about to become the Majestic Yosemite; The Wawona will be known as the Big Trees Lodge. Names that go back generations are being changed because of a trademark dispute between the National Park Service and a New York concessionaire that failed to renew its contract. Outraged residents and visitors are asking how that can happen

Listen to the Episode

El Niño Storms Are Finally Arriving, Is Los Angeles Ready?

Mudslides, floods and road-closings have been predicted for weeks ? and so has the plight of 29,000 homeless people who sleep on the streets of Los Angeles County. But today, the Civil Grand Jury called preparations "unconscionable and grossly inadequate." We get a response from local officials and update efforts to keep vulnerable people alive ? including those who are mentally ill.

Listen to the Episode

Good News behind the Rise in Crime

Last year, for the first time in more than a decade, all categories of crime in Los Angeles increased over the year before. Homicides went up by 10% to 280. That's a tragedy for the people directly involved ? and for the community. But consider that in 1992 there were almost four times as many murders ? 1,092. We look at the rise in crime in the context of city history.

Listen to the Episode

Could SoCal Gas Have Prevented the Porter Ranch Gas Leak?

The continuing gas leak that's moving thousands of families out of their homes is an ecological disaster of national proportion. It constitutes 21% of the state's methane emissions and 2.3% of its entire carbon footprint. Now it turns out that Southern California Gas Company removed a safety valve that could have stopped the leaking from pipes it knew were not just decades old but likely to have been corroded.

Listen to the Episode

Back To Top

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor

Support comes from