Fresh Air

Fresh Air

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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Best Of: Zach Galifianakis / Duplass Bros. / 'Mad Max' Director

Galifianakis plays a bitter rodeo clown in his new FX series 'Baskets.' He's also the creator of the Emmy-winning web comedy series 'Between Two Ferns.' Then Fresh Air producer Ann Marie Baldonado talks with brothers Jay and Mark Duplass about their HBO series 'Togetherness.' Finally, director George Miller discusses creating the 'Mad Max' franchise, which has spanned 36 years.

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50:15
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Better Call Saul's Bob Odenkirk / Co-Creator Peter Gould

'Better Call Saul,' the prequel, spin-off of 'Breaking Bad,' is back for season two. Last year, when Terry Gross spoke to co-creator Peter Gould (who also wrote for Breaking Bad), he said that it was a writers' room joke that if something didn't fit on 'Breaking Bad' it would go on the "Saul Goodman show." Actor Jonathan Banks joins the conversation. Also, Terry Gross spoke to Bob Odenkirk in 2013 about playing Saul, the sleazy, fast-talking lawyer.

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49:20
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Jill Lepore & Nate Silver Weigh In: Is Polling Good Or Bad For Democracy?

New Yorker writer Jill Lepore examines the history of polling in America. She says that today's polls may be less reliable — and more influential — than ever before. Then, statistician Nate Silver analyzes polls and predicts election outcomes on his website, FiveThirtyEight. He says this year's is "Maybe the most fascinating nomination race that we've ever seen."

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48:01
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Zach Galifianakis / The Duplass Brothers

Galifianakis plays a bitter rodeo clown in his new FX series 'Baskets.' He's also the creator of the Emmy-winning web comedy series 'Between Two Ferns.' Then Fresh Air producer Ann Marie Baldonado talks with brothers Jay and Mark Duplass about their HBO series 'Togetherness.' Jay stars in the Amazon series 'Transparent.'

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47:42
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Original 'Cabaret' Emcee Joel Grey

Joel Grey explains how he brought his decadent Cabaret character to life on both the stage and screen, and reflects on coming out as gay after years of being closeted. His memoir is 'Master Of Ceremonies.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Classic James P. Johnson Sessions (1921 - 1943).'

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47:34
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'Mad Max' Director George Miller

George Miller, who directed the first Mad Max film in 1979, says it will be a few years before he has any idea as to whether 'Mad Max: Fury Road' "really stuck." The film is nominated for 10 Oscars. Music historian Ed Ward remembers Dan Hicks.

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48:24
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Best Of: Bassem Youssef / 'Homegrown Terrorists' / Why Our 'First Bite' Matters

Known as the "Egyptian Jon Stewart," Bassem Youssef created what became the most popular TV show in Egypt's history, but the government had the show cancelled, and Youssef fled. Then, CNN's Peter Bergen describes how the Internet and social media have been used to radicalize and recruit Americans to jihad. Finally, Bee Wilson says that our taste preferences can be formed even before birth. Her new book is 'First Bite.'

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49:18
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Family Secret Revealed In 'My Father, The Pornographer'

Chris Offutt's late father went from running a small insurance agency to writing more than 400 books, mostly pornography. The writer tells Fresh Air his dad believed he would be "extremely famous" for it. Ken Tucker reviews Sia's album 'This is Acting.'

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46:18
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How We Learn To Eat

Bee Wilson says that our taste preferences can be formed even before birth. Her new book, 'First Bite,' examines how genetics, culture, memory and early feeding patterns contribute to a child's palate. Also, David Edelstein reviews the Coen brothers' new epic, 'Hail, Caesar!'

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46:54
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Political Satirist Bassem Youssef

Known as the "Egyptian Jon Stewart," Bassem Youssef created what became the most popular TV show in Egypt's history — but the government had the show cancelled, and Youssef fled. He talks about leaving a career in medicine for comedy, being detained and life after the Arab Spring. Also, Milo Miles reviews 'Big Grrrl Small World' from alt-rapper Lizzo.

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46:09
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