Fresh Air Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
Fresh Air

Fresh Air

From NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

'One Nation After Trump'

Journalists E.J. Dionne and Norm Ornstein believe the Trump presidency and this period of national soul-searching could lead to an era of Democratic renewal. Their new book (with Thomas Mann) is 'One Nation After Trump.' Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews 'Tomorrow Forever' by Matthew Sweet, and Lloyd Schwartz visits an art exhibit of paintings by Florine Stettheimer.

'One Nation After Trump'

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Hillary Rodham Clinton

Clinton returns to 'Fresh Air' to talk about her loss to Donald Trump, former FBI Director James Comey, and whether she would question the legitimacy of the election if we learn about deeper Russian interference. "I wouldn't rule it out," Clinton says. Her new memoir is 'What Happened.'

Hillary Rodham Clinton

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Best Of: NBC's Katy Tur / Pianist Fred Hersch

NBC reporter Katy Tur was at a rally in South Carolina when Trump called her name and pointed at her from the podium. Then, she says, "The entire place turns and they roar as one ... like a giant, unchained animal." Her new memoir about the campaign is 'Unbelievable.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Claire Messud's new novel, 'The Burning Girl.' Fred Hersch began his jazz career in the closet, but nearly 30 years ago, when people in the jazz world were afraid to come out, he identified himself as gay and HIV positive. Nine years ago he spent several weeks in a medically-induced coma; later he wrote songs inspired by his coma dreams. His memoir is 'Good Things Happen Slowly.'

Best Of: NBC's Katy Tur / Pianist Fred Hersch

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Bruce Springsteen

Springsteen spoke with Terry Gross last year about masculinity, New Jersey, and why he wishes he was his stage persona. His memoir 'Born to Run' is now out in paperback. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Mother!'

Bruce Springsteen

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Jazz Pianist Fred Hersch

Hersch began his jazz career in the closet, but nearly 30 years ago, when people in the jazz world were afraid to come out, he identified himself as gay and HIV positive. Nine years ago he spent several weeks in a medically-induced coma; later he wrote songs inspired by his coma dreams. His memoir is 'Good Things Happen Slowly.' TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Ken Burns documentary series on the Vietnam War.

Jazz Pianist Fred Hersch

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The Risk Of Nuclear War With North Korea

'New Yorker' writer Evan Osnos visited North Korea in August to understand what they really mean when they talk about nuclear war. He found that nuclear weapons are an essential part of their society.

The Risk Of Nuclear War With North Korea

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NBC's Katy Tur On The 'Unbelievable' Trump Campaign

Tur was at a rally in South Carolina when Trump called her name and pointed at her from the podium. Then, she says, "The entire place turns and they roar as one ... like a giant, unchained animal." Her new memoir about the campaign is 'Unbelievable.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Claire Messud's new novel, 'The Burning Girl.'

NBC's Katy Tur On The 'Unbelievable' Trump Campaign

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9/11 First Responder John Feal

Five days after the Sept. 11 attacks, while working at ground zero, an 8,000 lb. piece of steel fell on Feal's foot, crushing it. He became septic and almost died. Feal turned to activism when he was denied medical compensation by the government, and successfully lobbied for the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act for other first responders. "About 2,000 people have died because of their illnesses," Feal says. "They too are heroes."

9/11 First Responder John Feal

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Best Of: John Le Carré / Mike White

Bestselling novelist John Le Carré is familiar with the moral tension inherent to working in the espionage community. "I felt I had to suppress my humanity," Le Carré says of his time as a spy. His new book is 'A Legacy of Spies.' In Mike White's new film, 'Brad's Status,' a father starts to experience status anxiety while taking his son on a college tour. White says it's a universal situation, "but it's definitely a waste of time and energy."

Best Of: John Le Carré / Mike White

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Pamela Adlon On 'Better Things'

Adlon's FX series (which she co-created with Louis C.K.) is based on her own experience raising three girls as a single mom. The new season starts September 14. Also, John Powers reviews the new season of 'Top of the Lake,' and film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Unknown Girl.'

Pamela Adlon On 'Better Things'

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