Fresh Air Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
Fresh Air

Fresh Air

From NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Amy Tan On 'Where The Past Begins'

Tan explores the contradictions of her upbringing in the memoir, 'Where the Past Begins.' In it, she connects her experiences with spirituality to those of her parents and of her maternal grandmother, who was a concubine. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Death in the Air.'

Amy Tan On 'Where The Past Begins'

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'Why We Sleep'

Sleep scientist Matthew Walker says sleep deficiency is associated with problems with concentration, memory, the immune system and shorter lifespans. Walker discusses the effects of caffeine, alcohol, sleeping pills and some tips to help you sleep better. His book is 'Why We Sleep.' Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews the documentary 'Faces Places.'

'Why We Sleep'

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Best Of: Jimmy Fallon / Daniel Mendelsohn

The 'Tonight Show' host talks with Terry Gross about his new children's book, being entertaining in times of tragedy, and the biggest thing he learned from his time at 'SNL.' Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of Thelonious Monk, for the centennial of his birth. Author Daniel Mendelsohn says having his 81-year-old father in the college seminar he was teaching about 'The Odyssey' led to an unexpected bonding. His book is 'An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic.'

Best Of: Jimmy Fallon / Daniel Mendelsohn

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The Systemic Segregation Of Schools

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says school segregation will continue to exist in America "as long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children." Hannah-Jones is a 2017 MacArthur fellow. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Meyerowitz Stories,' directed by Noah Baumbach.

The Systemic Segregation Of Schools

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Jimmy Fallon

The 'Tonight Show' host talks with Terry Gross about his new children's book, being entertaining in times of tragedy, and the biggest thing he learned from his time at 'SNL.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix series 'Mindhunter.'

Jimmy Fallon

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Director Noah Baumbach / The Making Of 'Casablanca'

Baumbach's new film 'The Meyerowitz Stories' mixes comedy with deep emotional pain. It revolves around three adult siblings whose father is a self-absorbed sculptor. Baumbach's previous films include 'Frances Ha' and 'The Squid and the Whale.' Also, film historian Noah Isenberg talks about the making of 'Casablanca,' and why it endures 75 years later.

Director Noah Baumbach / The Making Of 'Casablanca'

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'Rex Tillerson At The Breaking Point'

'New Yorker' writer Dexter Filkins says Sec. of State Rex Tillerson is a diplomat in an administration that doesn't value diplomacy: "Rex is a sober, steady guy, and the president is anything but that." Filkins also talks about the possibility of war with North Korea, and the consequences of having an understaffed State Department. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of Thelonious Monk, on his 100th birthday.

'Rex Tillerson At The Breaking Point'

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Stalin's War On Ukraine

In the early 1930s Stalin orchestrated a famine to suppress the nationalist movement in Ukraine, and strengthen Russian influence. Millions of people died. Anne Applebaum says, "so much of why the Ukrainian famine was possible was because of the way in which the Soviet Union used disinformation, propaganda, and what we would now call hate speech to encourage people to do terrible things." Her book is 'The Red Famine.' Applebaum also discusses Russian interference in recent elections. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the short story collection 'The Obama Inheritance.'

Stalin's War On Ukraine

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Best Of: The 'Radical' Life Of Muhammad Ali / Cartoonist Roz Chast

Jonathan Eig talks about his new biography of Muhammad Ali, which draws on hundreds of interviews and previously unreleased FBI and Justice Department files. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says 50 years after the 'Summer of Love,' we're still using language popularized by hippies. Roz Chast talks about her new book of cartoons, 'Going into Town: A Love Letter to New York.'

Best Of: The 'Radical' Life Of Muhammad Ali / Cartoonist Roz Chast

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The Platinum Age Of TV

'Fresh Air' TV critic David Bianculli's book revisits the best of the small screen — from 'I Love Lucy' to 'The Walking Dead.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Florida Project.'

The Platinum Age Of TV

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