NPR: Fresh Air

NPR: Fresh Air

From NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from NPR: Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

'The End Of College' As We Know It

In his new book, 'The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere,' Kevin Carey envisions a future in which online education programs solve two of colleges' biggest problems: costs and admissions. Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Welcome to Braggsville,' and we remember 'jazz master' Orrin Keepnews.

Listen47:06

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Family Secret Revealed In 'My Father, The Pornographer'

Chris Offutt's late father went from running a small insurance agency to writing more than 400 books, mostly pornography. The writer tells Fresh Air his dad believed he would be "extremely famous" for it Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews organist Chris Foreman's album, 'Now Is The Time.'

Listen46:52

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Best Of: Larry Wilmore & The Quest To Stay Young Forever

Larry Wilmore, the Daily Show's former "Senior Black Correspondent," talks about his new role as the host of The Nightly Show, which fills the time slot vacated by The Colbert Report. Also we'll talk to Bill Gifford. His new book is 'Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (Or Die Trying).' And Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal considers the state of "the Internet of things," with a look at his new wi-fi enabled coffee maker.

Listen48:30

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Inside The World Series Of Poker

Colson Whitehead's book, 'The Noble Hustle,' now out in paperback, was born of an assignment to write about the World Series of Poker. It's a sharp observational tale of poker: those who play it and how it changed him. Then we remember former Notre Dame President Rev. Theodore Hesburgh. He was an author, theologian and activist. Finally David Edelstein reviews 'Maps to the Stars.'

Listen47:37

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The Quest To Stay Young Forever

"Nature knows how to let animals live a very long time," says Bill Gifford, whose latest book is 'Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (Or Die Trying),' a look at the history of anti-aging schemes and current ways people try to live longer. David Bianculli reviews 'Battle Creek.'

Listen47:08

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The Risk Of Transporting Oil By Train

Marcus Stern has spent the past year investigating the practice. Recent accidents in Canada and U.S. show that the rail cars aren't built for carrying so much oil, he says, and tracks are deteriorating. Also Ken Tucker reviews The Mavericks and tech correspondent Alexis Madrigal comments on smart home technology. 

Listen47:15

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Memoirist On Coming To Terms With Brother's Suicide

In his new memoir, Philip Connors writes about "living in the shadow of a suicide." Wracked by guilt and haunted by "what ifs," Connors investigated his brother's death and learned a terrible secret.  Critic at-large John Powers reviews 'Foyle's War.' 

Listen48:23

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Ojibwe Writer David Treuer

 Native American writer David Treuer talks about his family, his culture and his new novel, Prudence, about an Ojibwe reservation during World War II. Then Mark Woollen explains the process of cutting movie trailers and book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Mr. and Mrs. Disraeli. 

Listen47:07

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Best Of: Richard Price & David Remnick

Fresh Air Weekend: Novelist Richard Price says that in every precinct there's one cop who just can't let go of a case. "They all reminded me of Ahab ... looking for their whales," he says. Price's latest is called 'The Whites.' Then, David Remnick looks back on tough decisions as 'The New Yorker' turns 90. Remnick, who became editor in 1998, talks about his early days at the magazine and his biggest regret: He says he'd "love to have another crack" at covering Iraq's alleged weapons of mass destruction.

Listen49:24

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Poet Philip Levine & Lesley Gore

Former poet laureate Philip Levine's work often reflected the hardships and dignity of manual labor. He died Feb. 14 in Fresno, Calif. He was 87. In 1991, Levine spoke with Terry Gross about his collection 'What Work Is.'  Then jazz Critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'New Vocabulary' from saxophonist Ornette Coleman. We also remember Lesley Gore, who is known for her Top 40 sensations such as 'You Don't Own Me' and 'It's My Party.'  Her last album was released in 2005, the year she came out as a lesbian. She died Monday at the age of 68. Finally David Edelstein reviews 'Wild Tales.' 

Listen47:09

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