Colorado Matters

Colorado Matters

From Colorado Public Radio

Focusing on the state's people, issues and ideas, hear Colorado Matters on Colorado Public Radio's in-depth news station at www.cpr.org.More from Colorado Matters »

Most Recent Episodes

Professor Challenges The 'Ferguson Effect,' A New Eco Observatory's Challenges, We...

It's been called the "Ferguson Effect," and FBI Director James Comey describes it this way: "In today's YouTube World, are officers reluctant to get out of their cars and do the work that controls violent crime?" A CU boulder professor challenges the assumptions of the theory, saying there isn't data to back it up. Then, a new type of "ecological observatory" based in Colorado is measuring climate change, but challenges plague the project. And, as Valentines Day nears, we listen to your love letters.

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The Latest Historic Preservation Efforts In Colorado, A New Play Summit In Denver

Buildings that tell the story of Colorado are deteriorating, and some risk being lost altogether. Today we'll hear about the latest additions to the state's "endangered places" list. One is the Tabor Opera House in Leadville. Then, new plays hatch in Denver in a sort of theatrical incubator. This year's new play summit includes a piece about a female mariachi band, love in Antarctica, and one about a struggling climate scientist.

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Wall Street Looks At Water In The West, Choreographer Channels Violence Into Dance

Is Wall Street the answer to the water shortage in the West? That's the question investigative reporter Abrahm Lustgarten raises in a piece for ProPublica and The Atlantic. He profiles a hedge fund manager who's betting that water won't always be so cheap. Then, Rennie Harris has channeled the violence he grew up with into dance. The hip-hop choreographer is an artist-in-residence at CU Boulder. He joins us ahead of a big show this weekend.

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Teaching Doctors Not To Prescribe Painkillers, Putting Post-Partum OCD To Music

Addiction to prescription painkillers like oxycontin is at an all-time high. Some doctors feel pressured to prescribe. A new course teaches doctors and other medical providers to say, "No." Then, a Denver composer developed obsessive compulsive disorder just after she gave birth to her daughter. She talks about how music has helped her share her unusual experience.

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Investing In The Homeless, Talking Middle Ground Between Police, Minorities

Investors are betting on a Denver plan to help house 250 of city's chronically homeless. The backers make money if it works and lose money if it doesn't. But is the city taking too much of a gamble? We'll explore that question. Then, relationships between police and minorities are strained. Officers in Denver want to change that by getting young people and cops together to talk.

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A New Theoretical Framework For Migrants, Advice For Safe Winter Driving

Today there are more migrants around the world than ever before, according to the International Organization for Migration, perhaps over a million. A University of Denver professor has created a whole new political philosophy with migrants at its center. He tells us about it. Then, with winter in full swing, CDOT has been cracking down on drivers with dangerous bald tires to keep traffic flowing.

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What You Might Not Know About The Broncos' History, And About Former Owner Pat Bowlen

The Broncos take the field this Sunday for Super Bowl 50 against the Carolina Panthers, and we take a look back at the team's good, bad and sometimes strange history with a perhaps unlikely source. Then, owner Pat Bowlen had a profound impact on many in the Broncos organization including John Elway. We'll look back at his impact with former player John Lynch.

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Cyber Security In Colorado Springs, 'Born To Run' Legend Micah True

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and others have plans to create a national cyber security hub in Colorado Springs. We speak with a security expert about what that means. And, in an encore presentation, we revisit the story of running legend Micah True, who inspired the book "Born To Run," and is now the subject of a new documentary.

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The Latest On Army Discharging Troubled Combat Soldiers, Reaction To I-70 Overhaul Plans, The Com...

Thousands of soldiers have been kicked out of the U.S. Army for misconduct, despite many of them being mentally injured from their tours in Iraq or Afghanistan., and that means many are discharged without the health benefits they need to help heal. We have An update on a joint CPR News-NPR investigation. Then, the Colorado Department of Transportation is moving ahead with a massive project to transform and widen a section of I-70 in Denver, but not everyone is happy about it. And, as Denver's Kirkland Museum prepares to move into new digs, we'll hear the three pieces that embody the museum — not one of them is from the artist Vance Kirkland. We'll learn why after the news.

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Teens Sentenced To Life Without Parole, An Artist Works With Her Multiple Sclerosis

Today, the possibility of a second chance for 48 inmates in Colorado sentenced to life without parole as teenagers. The U.S. Supreme Court says their sentences must be reviewed. And, a Denver artist learns she had multiple sclerosis after waking up with distorted vision, and figures out a way to combine that new fact of life with her creativity.

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