Colorado Matters

Colorado Matters

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Focusing on the state's people, issues and ideas, hear Colorado Matters on Colorado Public Radio's in-depth news station at www.cpr.org.More from Colorado Matters »

Most Recent Episodes

Medicaid In Grand Junction, Kent Thompson Leaving Denver Center, Architect Gio Ponti

An experiment's gone on for the last several years on Colorado's Western Slope; seeing if the cost of Medicaid can be reduced while still improving people's health. Meanwhile, some hospitals in rural Colorado are worried about the impact of losing the Affordable Care Act. Then, a new book on healing the political divide. Also, for 12 years, Kent Thompson has served as producing artistic director for the Denver Center; he's leaving in March. And the only building Italian architect Gio Ponti designed in the United States was the Denver Art Museum. It's on Civic Center Park and looks like it's covered in scales.

Medicaid In Grand Junction, Kent Thompson Leaving Denver Center, Architect Gio Ponti

Churches As Sanctuaries, Tom Clark Retires, Opera On Transgender Woman

Nine Colorado congregations formed a network to shelter immigrants facing deportation. We look inside that network, where two women are currently in sanctuary. Then, why more young entrepreneurs are attracted to Metro Denver than anywhere else in the country. But Denver wasn't always such a draw — we speak with Tom Clark, who was instrumental in its metamorphosis. He retires next month. And, an opera about a different sort of metamorphosis-- its main character is transgender.

Immigrant Avoids Deportation By Hiding In Denver Church, Japanese Internment In Colorado

An immigration office in metro Denver drew protests Wednesday. The protesters tried — and failed — to stop authorities from ordering the deportation of an undocumented immigrant. Now she's hiding in a church basement in Denver. What her case may say about President Trump's immigration policies. Also, 75 years ago President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the executive order that led to the incarceration of thousands of U.S. residents of Japanese descent. On Sunday, Japanese Americans will hold a day of remembrance in Denver to mark the anniversary. And, every few years there's a familiar debate in education circles. Does more money make schools better?

Immigrant Avoids Deportation By Hiding In Denver Church, Japanese Internment In Colorado

A Rockefeller Confronts Dark History In Colorado, Air Force Academy Band Marks Milestone With New...

The Rockefellers are known as well-heeled industrialists but in Pueblo, Colorado their name is a reminder of the Ludlow Massacre, a bloody chapter in history. On Friday, David Rockefeller Jr. will visit Pueblo, marking the first time a Rockefeller has returned to the city to address its dark past. Also, as the U.S. Air Force hits its 70th birthday, we profile the Air Force Academy Band, which has commissioned new music to commemorate the anniversary.

A Rockefeller Confronts Dark History In Colorado, Air Force Academy Band Marks Milestone With New...

Answering Your Colorado Refugees Questions, Lannie Garrett's Favorite Love Songs

President Trump is trying to — at least temporarily — block refugees from settling in the US, and that's sparked a lot of questions from you: "What do refugees do when they get to Colorado?" "Why spend taxpayer money to support them over, say, Americans who are homeless?" "How can you help refugees?" We have the answers. Then, on Valentine's Day, Denver singer and longtime cabaret owner Lannie Garrett shares some of her favorite love songs.

Answering Your Colorado Refugees Questions, Lannie Garrett's Favorite Love Songs

The President's 'Kitchen Cabinet', How Writings On Detention Center Walls Inspired...

Your perception of George Washington may change when you hear about how he treated the first presidential cook. The story comes out of Denver author Adrian Miller's new book, "The President's Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of African-Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families." Then, writing on the walls of an immigrant detention center inspired Denver poet Teow Lim Goh. The poems in the men's barracks are still there, but the women's were destroyed in a fire. Goh imagines what those lost poems may have been in her latest collection called "Islanders."

The President's 'Kitchen Cabinet', How Writings On Detention Center Walls Inspired...

Twin Astronauts Health Study, RTD's Troubled Train To The Plane

Famous astronauts Mark and Scott Kelley are identical twins, and part of an ambitious experiment. Scientists studied Mark on Earth, while Scott lived in space for more than 340 days, and the results are surprising. Then, emails between RTD and the Federal Railroad Administration show a troubled relationship with the Train to the Plane. Plus, snowmobiler Colten Moore suffered a spinal cord injury at last month's X Games. His brother Caleb died after a similar accident in 2013.

American Indian Activist Led Landmark Lawsuit, Veterans' Voices In 'Stories From Wartim...

As the Dakota Access Pipeline rolls ahead, a look back at an earlier clash between Indian tribes and the federal government, when activist Elouise Cobell filed the largest class-action suit ever against the United States. Then, veterans describe their battlefield experiences in a long-running Regis University program called "Stories From Wartime." Students learn the history. Vets find it cathartic. And, the rules designed to help communities and industry avoid conflicts over oil and gas drilling are causing — conflict. Plus, an import from Denmark to Colorado: What's hygge?

American Indian Activist Led Landmark Lawsuit, Veterans' Voices In 'Stories From Wartim...

VW Settlement, A Check On New Oil and Gas Rules, Film Portrays A Human Born On Mars

The Volkswagen settlement means not just money for car owners and auto dealers but also for the state to pay for clean energy projects. Then, communities quarrel with new oil and gas operations despite state rules intended to ease the tension. Those rules also helped fund a forthcoming study of the potential health effects of living near drilling rigs. Also, the new film "The Space Between Us" is about the first human born on Mars, who wants to travel to Earth. And, an opera written especially for children.

VW Settlement, A Check On New Oil and Gas Rules, Film Portrays A Human Born On Mars

Both Sides Of Trump's Executive Order, Curling Championship, Make Yourself Happy Poetry

President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban has generated a lot of reaction in Colorado — from approval, to fear. We hear from both sides. Then, for a Colorado curling team, the countdown to the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea begins this weekend. Next, we meet an experimental poet, Eleni Sikelianos, who wants readers to tear into her new book "Make Yourself Happy" — literally. She's included pages that are meant to be ripped out and turned into three dimensional art. And, the story of two Colorado school districts that share a border, but are worlds apart.

Both Sides Of Trump's Executive Order, Curling Championship, Make Yourself Happy Poetry

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