Denver Police Grant Aims To Preempt Violent Extremism; Colorado Scientists Await Eclipse; 'F...

The attack in Charlottesville is a reminder that violent extremism can be homegrown. How Denver Police will use a $500,000 grant to fight terrorist recruitment and radicalization. Then, Colorado scientists are focusing on the sun's corona as they study Monday's eclipse. Also, the smash movie "Frozen," is headed to Broadway as a musical — after a first run in Denver that may help shape the show. Plus, it's a debut album from bluegrass band "The Lonesome Days," but the group's already made a mark — it's placed second twice at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival band competition.

Denver Police Grant Aims To Preempt Violent Extremism; Colorado Scientists Await Eclipse; 'F...

Where E-Bikes Can Go; Help For Troubled Farmers; New Thriller On Technology's Effects

Bike sales in general are sluggish, but sales of electric bikes are booming. Host Ryan Warner went for a ride on one to see what the fuss is about. And, the state just passed a new law to regulate e-bikes, but it's still not clear where you can ride them. Then, a new way for farmers with mental health troubles to get help. Also, a thriller set in Steamboat Springs asks whether technology like smartphones will save us or lead to our demise. Novelist Matt Richtel is a Pulitzer Prize-winning technology reporter for The New York Times.

Where E-Bikes Can Go; Help For Troubled Farmers; New Thriller On Technology's Effects

Negotiating With North Korea; Denver Nuclear Fallout Shelters; Community Land Trusts

Ambassador Christopher Hill, who's negotiated with the North Koreans in the past, says negotiating won't get them to shut down their nuclear program. Then, all the talk of nuclear war lately got us wondering about those remaining fallout shelters around Denver. And, the northern neighborhoods of Globeville and Elyria-Swansea see potential in a community land trust to preserve affordable housing in the area. Plus, Elvis Presley — the King of Rock n' Roll — died 40 years ago this month. August 16, 1977. We listen to a story about his Denver friendships.

Negotiating With North Korea; Denver Nuclear Fallout Shelters; Community Land Trusts

Colorado Teacher Shortage, Remembering Don Baylor and Newsman Lowell Thomas, Fort Morgan Meatpack...

Colorado has a serious teacher shortage. One solution? Train people in other professions to jump into the classroom. Plus, a Colorado meatpacking plant is found to have discriminated against Muslim workers. Also, the Rockies will remember their first manager, Don Baylor, this evening. And, Lowell Thomas was one of the country's most trusted voices, even though the Colorado-born newsman once played fast and loose with the truth.

Colorado Teacher Shortage, Remembering Don Baylor and Newsman Lowell Thomas, Fort Morgan Meatpack...

Why Hate Crimes Go Unreported; Singer Dan Fogelberg Joins Colorado Music Hall of Fame; Poetry Abo...

The U.S. Department of Justice reports more than half of hate-crime victims don't call law enforcement. In Denver, the Matthew Shephard Foundation wants to understand why. Also, critics say Denver's new data-driven policing strategy isn't properly used. Then, '70s singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg's music was inspired by his time in Colorado. He's about to be inducted into the state's Music Hall of Fame. And, Denver poet Robert Cooperman dodged the Vietnam draft, and he's not sorry. His new collection of poems reveals how and why he, and many others, avoided going to war. Plus, a mistake can shape the rest of your life, as it did for a Boulder climber whose misstep came high in the mountains of Myanmar.

Why Hate Crimes Go Unreported; Singer Dan Fogelberg Joins Colorado Music Hall of Fame; Poetry Abo...

Future Of Colorado's Health Exchange; New State Laws Begin; Pro Bike Race Starts; The Story...

Nearly 200,000 Coloradans buy coverage on the state's health exchange, but that system could be disrupted by what happens in Washington with Obamacare. The CEO of the exchange tell Colorado Matters about navigating the uncertainty and offers advice in the face of big premium hikes. Then, a new state law provides more legal protection for people who break into hot cars to rescue pets, but they have to make sure the pet is really in trouble. Plus, a look at other new laws taking effect today. And, a new pro bike race starts tomorrow. Can it survive where similar races have failed? Also, Spanish explorer Juan Rivera set out in 1765 to find riches and a tribe of bearded men in Colorado. Montrose archaeologist Steven Baker has written a book about that unusual and little-known journey.

Future Of Colorado's Health Exchange; New State Laws Begin; Pro Bike Race Starts; The Story...

Domestic Violence Reporting Rules Eased For Medical Professionals; Mountain Bike Racing; Murder M...

Colorado is about to end a requirement that medical professionals report possible cases of domestic violence to police, except in cases of serious bodily injury or for victims under the age of 18. Then, legendary mountain bike racer Dave Wiens hits a new trail — leading the sport's international association. He hopes both to grow mountain biking and to limit its impact on natural places. And, the new novel "Girl In Snow" opens at a high school assembly with the principal announcing a student has been murdered. The story is set on the Front Range, where the author grew up. And, uncovering secrets of Denver's Brown Palace Hotel on its 125th birthday.

Domestic Violence Reporting Rules Eased For Medical Professionals; Mountain Bike Racing; Murder M...

Challenge Of Faster Internet For Rural Colorado; Medical 'Hard Calls;' Libertarian Part...

The "Worst Internet in America" is in a rural part of Southern Colorado, according to an analysis by the website fivethirtyeight.com. The governor wants to improve internet speeds across the rural parts of the state by 2020, but the man he's put in charge thinks that goal may not be realistic. Then, listeners are asked to make some of the toughest decisions doctors face in a new podcast co-hosted by a University of Colorado bioethicist. And, the Libertarian Party started in a living room in Colorado; a new project documents its history. Finally, after a deadly home explosion, local governments explore what new levels of control they can legally exert over oil and gas operations.

Challenge Of Faster Internet For Rural Colorado; Medical 'Hard Calls;' Libertarian Part...

Airlines Resist Denver Airport Redo; Young Adult Novel In Print After Millions Of Online Reads

Denver International Airport never planned for long security lines that now exist on the main terminal. Those came about when new security measures were put into place after 9/11. Now, as part of a $1.8 billion renovation, the airport wants to reclaim the space. But, the airlines that would help foot the bill aren't on board yet. Then, when she was just 16, Pueblo's Alison Jervis wrote a novel and posted it online. After more than 24 million reads, it's now in print. The book is about teen suicide and Death is a main character. Plus, the rock n' roll history made at Caribou Ranch.

Airlines Resist Denver Airport Redo; Young Adult Novel In Print After Millions Of Online Reads

Coffman's Health Care Town Hall; Cyclist On The Colorado Classic; Better Birth Control For W...

GOP Rep. Mike Coffman, of Aurora, got an earful from conservative and liberal constituents at a town hall Tuesday night focused on health care and immigration. Then, cyclist Taylor Phinney, of Boulder, is the kind of guy who walks naked on the team bus joking with his teammates. Fresh off his first Tour de France, he'll compete in next week's Colorado Classic. Also, as the population of wild horses grows, Congress is debating whether to authorize euthanasia. Scientists in Colorado say they've improved birth control to keep the population down. Plus, with legal marijuana, dogs taught to detect pot can complicate police work. And, Colorado-born singer Arum Rae on growing up in church and her unique style.

Coffman's Health Care Town Hall; Cyclist On The Colorado Classic; Better Birth Control For W...

Governor Says Cutting An ACA Subsidy Would Be 'Disastrous'; 'Zombie' Disease...

This could be another pivotal week for health care, as the president decides whether to continue a program that brings down the cost of insurance for poor people — and, supporters say, helps stabilize the market for everybody. Gov. John Hickenlooper is watching closely. He's also eyeing how the feds will deal with states that have legalized marijuana. Then, is there a connection between climate change and health in Colorado? Plus, a disease that makes zombies of deer and elk. It was first found in Colorado, and now a scientist here wants to fight it — with wildfires and wild horses. And, Steve Jobs' life was operatic ... now it's an actual opera, playing its first run in Santa Fe.

Governor Says Cutting An ACA Subsidy Would Be 'Disastrous'; 'Zombie' Disease...

Self-Driving Trucks; Colorado Car Thefts Are Up; YA Novel About An Arranged Marriage

If trucks drive themselves, what happens to truck drivers? One Colorado rig owner fears losing his job, but his bigger concern is what would happen if the truck were hacked going 70 miles an hour. Then, crime is up in Colorado in virtually every category, particularly car thefts, which are something of a jumping-off point for criminals. And, a culture clash is at the heart of a new novel for young adults that's already a bestseller. Monument, Colorado author Sandhya Menon writes about an Indian immigrant family that tries to arrange a daughter's marriage, except she's American-born and she's not having it.

Self-Driving Trucks; Colorado Car Thefts Are Up; YA Novel About An Arranged Marriage

Planning For Denver's Population Boom; The Oil Industry's Women Pioneers; Making Candy Toppi...

Denver's planning director discusses the city's efforts to address traffic, the rising cost of living and preserving neighborhood character — all topics that ranked high in a resident survey. Plus, Denver City Councilman Rafael Espinoza on growth pressures in his neighborhoods. Then, the role women played in Colorado oil exploration. And, if you add candy toppings to your ice cream treat, they were likely made in Pueblo. Also, a Denver playwright's "Boat Person," chronicles his family's escape from Vietnam.

Planning For Denver's Population Boom; The Oil Industry's Women Pioneers; Making Candy Toppi...

Gun Victims' Portraits; How To Hunt On Deployment; American Indian Youth In International Ga...

Gunshot victims from across the country agreed to return to the places where they were shot and have their photos taken for a new book, "SHOT: 101 Survivors of Gun Violence in America." Karina Sartiaguin is among those featured. She was 16 when she was shot and paralyzed outside her Aurora high school. Also in the show, a butcher who's carved out an unusual niche: He teaches Army Special Forces to kill and butcher animals that they can eat on deployment. Then, 60 American Indian teens from Southern Colorado competed in the recent North American Indigenous Games in Toronto. They brought home four medals. Plus, a preview of this week's Underground Music Showcase in Denver.

Gun Victims' Portraits; How To Hunt On Deployment; American Indian Youth In International Ga...

Why People Think They Know More Than They Actually Do; Denver Broncos' Frank Answers On Poli...

Get acquainted with your own ignorance. Cognitive scientist Philip Fernbach of the University of Colorado Boulder studies why people think they know more than they actually do. He writes, in a new book, that it fuels the political divide in America, including in the current health care debate. Then, nearly 90 percent of Denver Broncos players grew up in lower- or middle-income households. That's one thing that came out of Sports Illustrated magazine's unusual survey of the Broncos' locker room, which also asked players about their political involvement. And, a large Evangelical church in Denver that recently voted for LGBT inclusion hears a sermon from a trans pastor.

Why People Think They Know More Than They Actually Do; Denver Broncos' Frank Answers On Poli...

Sen. Gardner On Healthcare; Forecasting Nuclear Winter; Pretty Tough Plants; Vail Dance Festival

Nuclear war is now more likely than its been since the 1980s. Two Boulder researchers are leading a team to describe, as vividly as possible, what the world would look like after a nuclear conflict. Also, Republican U.S. Senator Cory Gardner, ahead of what could be the biggest vote of his career, on healthcare. Then, Coloradans are on a global hunt for pretty plants that can thrive in arid Western gardens. Plus, the head of the Vail Dance Festival lands a new gig: leading the Juilliard School to help prepare young artists.

Sen. Gardner On Healthcare; Forecasting Nuclear Winter; Pretty Tough Plants; Vail Dance Festival

Mentally Ill Inmates And Solitary; Nucla's Colorful History; Trump Not At Conservative Summi...

At a federal prison in southern Colorado, one mentally ill inmate spent almost 19 years in solitary confinement. A new federal report says prisoners with mental health problems are confined to solitary for longer than others in the prison population. And, the Western Slope town of Nucla started as a socialist utopia, then became a center of uranium mining. Now, residents worry about their town's economic survival. Then, Donald Trump came to last year's Western Conservative Summit to make peace with Colorado Republicans who opposed his presidential candidacy. This year, he won't attend, and those same conservatives are frustrated by his administration's failed efforts at health care reform. Plus, the story of a Colorado man who created his own currency.

Mentally Ill Inmates And Solitary; Nucla's Colorful History; Trump Not At Conservative Summi...

Aurora Theater Survivors; Bennet On Health Care Debate; Newly-Reopened Ute Museum

Five years after the Aurora Theater shooting, we check in with husband and wife Caleb and Katie Medley. Caleb was shot in the head while Katie escaped uninjured along with their unborn baby, whom she later gave birth to while her husband was in a coma. Caleb had been pursuing a comedy career before the attack and says the biggest challenges he faces now are being confined to a wheelchair and having trouble speaking. Then, Senator Michael Bennet talks about the future of the health care debate and what he'd do to improve on the current system. Plus, a contemporary view of the Ute Indians in their newly renovated museum.

Aurora Theater Survivors; Bennet On Health Care Debate; Newly-Reopened Ute Museum

Protecting Immigrants From Fraud; The Challenge Of Translating Jokes; Art Exhibit Critiques Shodd...

Immigrants in Colorado are losing money and time, and even risk deportation, when they go to people who aren't lawyers for legal services. Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett says his department has been successful in cutting down on what's called "notario fraud," and can help people elsewhere in the state. Then, the challenge of translating jokes. Is a chicken crossing the road as funny in another language? Plus, there's a big gold frame at a museum in Denver, but, oddly, there's no picture inside. It's made of cheap material and the artist says the installation is a commentary on low-quality construction he sees going up in the metro area. And, Boulder progressive Bluegrass quintet Yonder Mountain String Band recently released a new album — we had a preview last December.

Protecting Immigrants From Fraud; The Challenge Of Translating Jokes; Art Exhibit Critiques Shodd...

A Bathroom Experiment In Denver; 'Trail Trash Of Colorado'; Food That Sparked Tears Of...

Denver is conducting a bathroom experiment. After too many people were relieving themselves in the street, the city invested in mobile restrooms and is tracking their use. Then, this man's goal is to shame people, online, who misbehave in the outdoors. Those targeted include people who do things like swim where they're not supposed to or illegally feed wildlife. The creator of the "Trail Trash of Colorado" Instagram account now says the shaming may have gone too far and he may even shut the account down. And, what led a Denver Post food writer to tears. Plus, fire management crews fighting wildfires have a new and different problem on their hands when they go to work: drones.

A Bathroom Experiment In Denver; 'Trail Trash Of Colorado'; Food That Sparked Tears Of...

A Military 'Space Corps'? Colorado's SOS On Releasing Voter Info; Former Sheriff...

Congressman Doug Lamborn wants to create a Space Corps — a separate military service for space. The Colorado Springs Republican explains why he backs the proposal, which critics say could hurt his own community. Then, Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams on his decision to release voter data to the White House — and on his suggestions for changes to the national election system. Plus, former El Paso County sheriff Terry Maketa faced possible jail time for abuse of power but a jury found him not guilty on some counts, and couldn't decide on others. A local reporter joins us to talk about what's next. And, during a ski trip to Aspen in 1968, John Oates first found Colorado or, as he describes it, his "destiny." Oates' new memoir describes the personal struggles that eventually led him to move to the state full time. He also tells us the very New York story behind the hit "Maneater."

A Military 'Space Corps'? Colorado's SOS On Releasing Voter Info; Former Sheriff...

Colorado's Newest Political Party; Novel Based On Real-Life Murder In Aurora; Understanding...

We'll meet the man who founded Colorado's Unity Party, which is now officially recognized in the state. The party, which has its state convention this weekend, would allow 16-year-olds to vote and make healthcare costs deductible. Then, author Matthew Sullivan's new mystery novel is based, in part, on the real-life murder of a family in Aurora that's never been solved. And, we'll talk about "slow food" and why its gaining popularity in the state. Plus, a new start-up in Colorado is finding a market for food that would otherwise be wasted.

Colorado's Newest Political Party; Novel Based On Real-Life Murder In Aurora; Understanding...

Sexual Harassment In The Tech Industry; An App That Helps You Save Money; Nolan Arenado's Wa...

More women in tech are speaking up about sexual harassment. It led one venture capitalist accused of harassment to resign recently with this statement: "The gap of influence between male venture capitalists and female entrepreneurs is frightening and I hate that my behavior played a role in perpetrating a gender-hostile environment." This caused one Denver CEO to cut her ties with that funder. Then, a new app that's supposed to help you save money. And, Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado explains why he chose a beat that hits hard for his walk-up song. Plus, the high desert of Western Colorado has a lead role in a new novel. And, a master sergeant who was severely wounded in Afghanistan 11 years ago has become a champion shot-putter.

Sexual Harassment In The Tech Industry; An App That Helps You Save Money; Nolan Arenado's Wa...

Marijuana And Traffic Searches; Rocky Mountain National Park Photographer; Charlie Blackmon Walk-...

Colorado State Patrol officers search far fewer drivers during traffic stops now than they did before recreational marijuana was legal, according to a new Stanford University study. Then, Rocky Mountain National Park is one of the most photographed parks in the country, but it'd be hard to find anyone who captures it better than Erik Stensland. He offers advice on taking good landscape photographs. And Colorado Rockies' all-star outfielder Charlie Blackmon talks about how he decided on the song that sets the tone for his at-bats. Also, with the current fire in Breckenridge largely contained, we look back on a deadly 2013 blaze in Arizona.

Marijuana And Traffic Searches; Rocky Mountain National Park Photographer; Charlie Blackmon Walk-...