Where Colorado's Congress Reps And Senators Are; Bathroom Access For Transgender Students; H...

Senators and members of Congress haven't hosted town halls in Colorado this week. CPR's Sam Brasch explains what they have been up to. Then, how the Trump Administration's decision about transgender students and bathrooms will affect Colorado schools. Plus, Russia's representative in the western United States is in Colorado to talk about trade. And Aurora high school sophomore Francesca Belibi could dunk a basketball before she knew the rules of the game. A video of her went viral, after ESPN made it a top 10 play.

Where Colorado's Congress Reps And Senators Are; Bathroom Access For Transgender Students; H...

Colorado's Chance To Land Outdoor Retail Businesses; La La Land Choreographer; Movie Quotes;...

A major trade show for outdoor retailers is pulling out of Utah over concerns about how politicians there treat public lands. The show — and some businesses on its roster --may land in Colorado. Then, the choreographer of Oscar-favorite La La Land is from Breckenridge. She tells us how she trained stars Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. Then, the stories behind memorable lines that movie stars said — and didn't say — through the years. And, a famed clarinetist and his pianist son share family memories ahead of a concert they'll perform together.

Colorado's Chance To Land Outdoor Retail Businesses; La La Land Choreographer; Movie Quotes;...

Governor On Trump Immigration Plan; Climate Change On Stage; Mines Students Head To National Ethi...

Gov. John Hickenlooper says the state patrol is "not inclined" to help enforce President Donald Trump's new immigration plan. The governor also offers his opinion on a lawsuit over Boulder's oil and gas production moratorium, and weighs in on other issues. Then, the Denver Center's new play, "Two Degrees," explores climate change. And, a team from the Colorado School of Mines heads to a national competition this weekend to argue issues such as whether bartenders can refuse to serve pregnant women. Plus, a Coloradan is the first woman to appear in a CoverGirl ad campaign wearing a hijab.

Governor On Trump Immigration Plan; Climate Change On Stage; Mines Students Head To National Ethi...

Medicaid In Grand Junction, Kent Thompson Leaving Denver Center, Architect Gio Ponti

An experiment's gone on for the last several years on Colorado's Western Slope; seeing if the cost of Medicaid can be reduced while still improving people's health. Meanwhile, some hospitals in rural Colorado are worried about the impact of losing the Affordable Care Act. Then, a new book on healing the political divide. Also, for 12 years, Kent Thompson has served as producing artistic director for the Denver Center; he's leaving in March. And the only building Italian architect Gio Ponti designed in the United States was the Denver Art Museum. It's on Civic Center Park and looks like it's covered in scales.

Medicaid In Grand Junction, Kent Thompson Leaving Denver Center, Architect Gio Ponti

Churches As Sanctuaries, Tom Clark Retires, Opera On Transgender Woman

Nine Colorado congregations formed a network to shelter immigrants facing deportation. We look inside that network, where two women are currently in sanctuary. Then, why more young entrepreneurs are attracted to Metro Denver than anywhere else in the country. But Denver wasn't always such a draw — we speak with Tom Clark, who was instrumental in its metamorphosis. He retires next month. And, an opera about a different sort of metamorphosis-- its main character is transgender.

Immigrant Avoids Deportation By Hiding In Denver Church, Japanese Internment In Colorado

An immigration office in metro Denver drew protests Wednesday. The protesters tried — and failed — to stop authorities from ordering the deportation of an undocumented immigrant. Now she's hiding in a church basement in Denver. What her case may say about President Trump's immigration policies. Also, 75 years ago President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the executive order that led to the incarceration of thousands of U.S. residents of Japanese descent. On Sunday, Japanese Americans will hold a day of remembrance in Denver to mark the anniversary. And, every few years there's a familiar debate in education circles. Does more money make schools better?

Immigrant Avoids Deportation By Hiding In Denver Church, Japanese Internment In Colorado

A Rockefeller Confronts Dark History In Colorado, Air Force Academy Band Marks Milestone With New...

The Rockefellers are known as well-heeled industrialists but in Pueblo, Colorado their name is a reminder of the Ludlow Massacre, a bloody chapter in history. On Friday, David Rockefeller Jr. will visit Pueblo, marking the first time a Rockefeller has returned to the city to address its dark past. Also, as the U.S. Air Force hits its 70th birthday, we profile the Air Force Academy Band, which has commissioned new music to commemorate the anniversary.

A Rockefeller Confronts Dark History In Colorado, Air Force Academy Band Marks Milestone With New...

Answering Your Colorado Refugees Questions, Lannie Garrett's Favorite Love Songs

President Trump is trying to — at least temporarily — block refugees from settling in the US, and that's sparked a lot of questions from you: "What do refugees do when they get to Colorado?" "Why spend taxpayer money to support them over, say, Americans who are homeless?" "How can you help refugees?" We have the answers. Then, on Valentine's Day, Denver singer and longtime cabaret owner Lannie Garrett shares some of her favorite love songs.

Answering Your Colorado Refugees Questions, Lannie Garrett's Favorite Love Songs

The President's 'Kitchen Cabinet', How Writings On Detention Center Walls Inspired...

Your perception of George Washington may change when you hear about how he treated the first presidential cook. The story comes out of Denver author Adrian Miller's new book, "The President's Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of African-Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families." Then, writing on the walls of an immigrant detention center inspired Denver poet Teow Lim Goh. The poems in the men's barracks are still there, but the women's were destroyed in a fire. Goh imagines what those lost poems may have been in her latest collection called "Islanders."

The President's 'Kitchen Cabinet', How Writings On Detention Center Walls Inspired...

Twin Astronauts Health Study, RTD's Troubled Train To The Plane

Famous astronauts Mark and Scott Kelley are identical twins, and part of an ambitious experiment. Scientists studied Mark on Earth, while Scott lived in space for more than 340 days, and the results are surprising. Then, emails between RTD and the Federal Railroad Administration show a troubled relationship with the Train to the Plane. Plus, snowmobiler Colten Moore suffered a spinal cord injury at last month's X Games. His brother Caleb died after a similar accident in 2013.

American Indian Activist Led Landmark Lawsuit, Veterans' Voices In 'Stories From Wartim...

As the Dakota Access Pipeline rolls ahead, a look back at an earlier clash between Indian tribes and the federal government, when activist Elouise Cobell filed the largest class-action suit ever against the United States. Then, veterans describe their battlefield experiences in a long-running Regis University program called "Stories From Wartime." Students learn the history. Vets find it cathartic. And, the rules designed to help communities and industry avoid conflicts over oil and gas drilling are causing — conflict. Plus, an import from Denmark to Colorado: What's hygge?

American Indian Activist Led Landmark Lawsuit, Veterans' Voices In 'Stories From Wartim...

VW Settlement, A Check On New Oil and Gas Rules, Film Portrays A Human Born On Mars

The Volkswagen settlement means not just money for car owners and auto dealers but also for the state to pay for clean energy projects. Then, communities quarrel with new oil and gas operations despite state rules intended to ease the tension. Those rules also helped fund a forthcoming study of the potential health effects of living near drilling rigs. Also, the new film "The Space Between Us" is about the first human born on Mars, who wants to travel to Earth. And, an opera written especially for children.

VW Settlement, A Check On New Oil and Gas Rules, Film Portrays A Human Born On Mars

Both Sides Of Trump's Executive Order, Curling Championship, Make Yourself Happy Poetry

President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban has generated a lot of reaction in Colorado — from approval, to fear. We hear from both sides. Then, for a Colorado curling team, the countdown to the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea begins this weekend. Next, we meet an experimental poet, Eleni Sikelianos, who wants readers to tear into her new book "Make Yourself Happy" — literally. She's included pages that are meant to be ripped out and turned into three dimensional art. And, the story of two Colorado school districts that share a border, but are worlds apart.

Both Sides Of Trump's Executive Order, Curling Championship, Make Yourself Happy Poetry

Fighting Service Animal Fraud, Colorado's First Supreme Court Justice, Endangered Places

Some people try to pass their dogs off as service animals to get them into apartments and restaurants, but a new Colorado law tries to curb that behavior. Then, if Neil Gorsuch is confirmed by the U.S. Senate, he'll be the second Coloradan to serve on the Supreme Court. Byron White was appointed to the high court in 1962, and we talk with White's former clerk Dennis Hutchinson. Plus, a kitchy roadside Colorado attraction is endangered of being lost along with other "endangered places" in the state. And, Aurora's first poet laureate Jovan Mays' term ends. He reflects on what's been a bumpy ride.

Fighting Service Animal Fraud, Colorado's First Supreme Court Justice, Endangered Places

Colorado Ups Its Cybersecurity Game, New Bison Podcast, The Humor In Childhood Awkwardness

Tracking down cyber criminals gets harder every day for federal prosecutors; a new unit at the U.S. attorney's office focuses on cyber crimes and national security. Then, the American bison was recently named the country's first "national mammal," but that vision doesn't sit well with some. Plus, we hear embarrassing childhood memories relayed on stage in front of total strangers. And, as the debate plays out nationally, the battle over Colorado's health care exchange has already begun. Also, "Those Who Can't" gets picked up for a third season.

Colorado Ups Its Cybersecurity Game, New Bison Podcast, The Humor In Childhood Awkwardness

Former Clerk On SCOTUS Nominee, Critic Of New Denver Police Policy, Coloradan To Race Across Russ...

Federal judge Neil Gorsuch of Boulder is in line to replace Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. We'll learn more about Gorsuch's record and personality from his former clerk. Then, Denver Police are making a new use of force policy.Lisa Caldaron of the Colorado Latino Forum provides her thoughts on the document. Next, the Trans-Siberian Extreme is the longest cycling race on earth, and the only U.S. male invited to participate in the race across Russia this year is from Colorado. Plus, a Fort Collins man has gone pro in drone racing.

Former Clerk On SCOTUS Nominee, Critic Of New Denver Police Policy, Coloradan To Race Across Russ...

Colorado Refugees And Trump Order, New Denver Police Use Of Force Policy, Climbing Volcanoes In A...

More than four dozen people from around the world were scheduled to arrive in Colorado this week and begin living as refugees, but their trips were canceled after President Donald Trump issued an executive order. The state's refugee coordinator tells us what's ahead. Also, the Denver police department recently proposed changes to its use of force policy, but there's been criticism locally. Then, Littleton "space artist" Michael Carroll and a friend traveled to the top of Mt. Erebus for research on a book about volcanoes in space. And, Pueblo oil painter Teresa Vito could see her artwork cruising Interstate 25 if lawmakers approve a special license plate featuring her painting of Pueblo chiles.

Colorado Refugees And Trump Order, New Denver Police Use Of Force Policy, Climbing Volcanoes In A...

Coloradan Helps Refugees, Drug Options For Aid In Dying, Colorado Journalist Stars in Transgender...

A Boulder man dropped everything to help refugees in Greece after hearing an account of the crisis on CPR's Colorado Matters. Then, it's not clear what drugs terminally ill patients would use under Colorado's new aid in dying law. We hear about experiments in other states. Also, a new play about transgender women stars a Colorado reporter. Plus, the mechanical issues that plagued RTD's Train to the Plane last year are largely resolved but the A Line is still dogged by crossing gates that don't work. And, a new satellite built in Colorado promises to improve weather forecasting and is now sending back it's first pictures.

Coloradan Helps Refugees, Drug Options For Aid In Dying, Colorado Journalist Stars in Transgender...

Finding Funds For Colorado's Female Entrepreneurs, A Sculptor's Take On Aging

Female entrepreneurs in Colorado have a tough time getting money to grow their businesses. Two Boulder investors are betting that helping women scale up will pay off. Then, a Colorado sculptor says as she's gotten older, people treat her differently. She explores that in her latest show. And, Denver architect Curt Fentress, who designed the iconic terminal at Denver International Airport, is being inducted into the Colorado Business Hall of Fame. A look back at Fentress' 2010 book, "Touchstones of Design: Redefining Public Architecture." Plus, the Colorado Department of Transportation is experimenting with a tax based on miles driven.

Finding Funds For Colorado's Female Entrepreneurs, A Sculptor's Take On Aging

Film On Teen Suicide, Colorado Reporter On Covering President Trump, Metal Frontman To Grammy-Nom...

Colorado has one of the highest youth suicide rates in the country. We hear the reasons, and talk solutions. Then, a Denver Post reporter was one of the few journalists inside the White House on President Trump's first Monday in office. And, much of agriculture is suffering in Colorado, thanks to stubbornly low prices from corn and wheat, to cattle and oil and gas. Colorado's farm and ranch income has hit its lowest level since 1986. Plus, Kit Winger fronted his own 80's metal band-- now the former Coloradan has turned his attention to classical music, and is nominated for a Grammy.

Film On Teen Suicide, Colorado Reporter On Covering President Trump, Metal Frontman To Grammy-Nom...

Skier Safety Campaign, Asthma Misdiagnoses, Trails Wheelchair, Railway Troubadour

On Christmas Eve six years ago, Chauncey and Kelli Johnson lost their young daughter in a skiing accident with a snowboarder. The Johnsons have now created a skier safety campaign. Then, asthma is a common disease but a new study finds it's also commonly misdiagnosed. An article in the most recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association says a third of adults who are told they have asthma actually don't. Also, a paraplegic athlete from Denver has found a new way to get around the rugged trails of Colorado — she recently started using a new chair that she says has reintroduced her to the world of hiking. And there's a new musical feature coming to some long-distance passenger trains in the U.S. ... a singing troubadour.

Skier Safety Campaign, Asthma Misdiagnoses, Trails Wheelchair, Railway Troubadour

Women's March Organizer Talks Next Steps, The Future Of Underground Art Spaces In Denver

An organizer of the Women's March on Denver was pleasantly surprised by Saturday's turnout, but knows it won't be easy to create a sustained movement. Then, a discussion on the future of underground art spaces in Denver after two venues were closed. Plus, protesters hope to shut down a talk by Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulus at CU Boulder this week. We meet a student who invited Yiannopolus to campus.

Women's March Organizer Talks Next Steps, The Future Of Underground Art Spaces In Denver

Colorado High Schoolers Talk Trump And Their Future, Local Artists Take On Religion, A Stellar Me...

The day before Donald Trump's inauguration, high school students from across the state talk about their hopes and concerns, and what responsibility they feel toward their country and community. Then, artists take on the topic of religion in a new show in Denver. One piece is a collection of crosses made from everyday objects like salt shakers and remote controls. And, a Boulder man's brush with heavyweight boxing champ Muhammad Ali — which took a very stellar turn.

Colorado High Schoolers Talk Trump And Their Future, Local Artists Take On Religion, A Stellar Me...

Colorado-Made Spacecraft To Explore Asteroids, Famed Freed Slave Clara Brown, Lawyer-Turned-Comed...

NASA wants to know more about asteroids, which are remnants of an earlier time in the solar system. A Colorado team was just chosen to develop a spacecraft that will spend nearly two decades exploring Trojan asteroids. Then, there's a new documentary about Clara Brown, a slave torn apart from her children. When Brown was freed, she came to Colorado to look for her children and became a successful businesswoman. Plus, Troy Walker got his law degree from the University of Denver and then turned to stand-up comedy. Now, his career is taking off.

Colorado-Made Spacecraft To Explore Asteroids, Famed Freed Slave Clara Brown, Lawyer-Turned-Comed...