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From KQED Public Radio

KQED's live call-in program presents wide-ranging discussions of local, state, national and international issues, as well as in-depth interviews.More from Forum »

Most Recent Episodes

Sen. Bernie Sanders on the Future of the Progressive Movement

As the Democratic Party faces an uncertain future following November's election, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders may be the party's best hope for regaining prominence. The longest serving Independent in congressional history, many are looking to Sanders to play a crucial role in holding President-elect Trump accountable. Bernie's new book, "Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In" looks back on his presidential campaign and provides a blueprint for a new progressive agenda.

C.W. Nevius on 36 Years at the San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle columnist C.W. Nevius is leaving the paper after 36 years of entertaining, informing and sometimes infuriating Bay Area residents. Forty years ago, Nevius left a career as an English teacher to cover high school sports for a small Colorado paper. He later landed at the Chronicle, first as a sports writer and then as a columnist who was a frequent irritant to San Francisco's progressive politicians and activists for his stances on the homeless and other issues. We'll talk to Nevius about his career, leaving journalism and what it's like for a guy who would be considered liberal in most cities, to be thought of as San Francisco's staunch conservative.

Bravo's Andy Cohen Goes Beyond 'Superficial' and Spills His Secrets

Andy Cohen is used to drama. Before he hosted his own Bravo TV show, he produced the "Real Housewives" reality series where he managed mascara-streaked meltdowns on and off camera. In his latest book, "Superficial," he turns the lens on himself, sharing his diary entries about loneliness and his search for a relationship. The host of "Watch What Happens Live" gives us the scoop on the behind-the-scenes drama of reality TV and his own offscreen life.

New President, New Rules? President-Elect Trump and the Press

In the past week, president-elect Donald Trump has tweeted that anyone who burned a U.S. flag should, perhaps, be stripped of citizenship or thrown in jail. He also tweeted that millions of people voted illegally in the recent election, which is not true. Both tweets received lots of news coverage but Trump's comments have also stirred a debate: Should news outlets cover everything the President-elect tweets, even if it is untrue? Is this an unprecedented era where the old journalism rule book doesn't apply? Forum discusses the multiple approaches news outlets are taking to covering the President-elect and his relationship with the press.

Stanford Historian Makes Case for American 'Enlightenments'

The American Enlightenment is often viewed as a singular era bursting with new ideas as the U.S. sought to assert itself as a new republic free of the British monarchy. In her book, "American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason,"Stanford historian Caroline Winterer says the myth and romanticization of an American Enlightenment was invented during the Cold War to calm fears about totalitarianism overseas. We talk to Winterer about her theory and hear her thoughts on what she views as America's multiple periods of enlightenments in fields ranging from farming to religion.

U.S. Supreme Court Considers Whether Immigrants Awaiting Hearings Can Be Detained Indefinitely

The Supreme Court is hearing arguments Wednesday over whether immigrants can be detained indefinitely while awaiting deportation hearings. Approximately 400,000 people a year are detained by federal immigration officials, some for more than a year, while fighting their deportations. The American Civil Liberties Union says that's unconstitutional and filed a class action lawsuit requiring bond hearings to be held within six months. The case is being watched especially close because the outcome could limit President-elect Trump's immigration policy.

U.S. Supreme Court Considers Whether Immigrants Awaiting Hearings Can Be Detained Indefinitely

State Democrats Win Supermajority in Both Legislative Houses

California Democrats have regained a supermajority in both houses of the state legislature with Fullerton Democrat Josh Newman winning the 29th Senate District late Monday. Newman's win gives Democrats control of 27 of the state's 40 senate districts. Though some political analysts say that a supermajority is overrated, it could in theory make it easier for Democrats to raise taxes, override a governor's veto or place measures on the ballot. Democrats last held a supermajority in the California legislature in 2012.

Dispelling Common Myths About Native Americans

Last week 2,000 protesters of the Dakota Access Pipeline shared a Thanksgiving feast at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota. As those protesters draw world wide attention to Native American rights and issues, Forum talks with the authors of "All the Real Indians Died Off and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans." The authors address fictions such as "Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims" and "Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol." We'll discuss misconceptions about Native Americans and the surge of activism around the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Addiction is an Illness, Not 'a Moral Failing,' Says Surgeon General

The U.S. surgeon general released a landmark report this month calling for "a cultural shift in how we think about addiction." Addiction is a chronic illness, not a moral failing, says the report. It comes at a time when one in seven Americans will experience substance abuse at some time in their lives, but only one in 10 will get the treatment needed. We'll discuss the report and how to improve access to effective treatment options.

Richard Blum on Poverty, Innovation and Compassion

Despite a significant reduction in the proportion of the world population living in extreme poverty in recent decades, billions still lack access to food, shelter, clean water and other basic necessities. And because of this, says investor and UC regent Richard Blum, people of means need to do more to relieve those struggling in developing countries. Blum joins us to discuss his new book, "An Accident of Geography: Compassion, Innovation and the Fight Against Poverty," which tells the stories of dozens of successful approaches used to advance global development and alleviate extreme poverty.

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