Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin From WNYC
Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin

Most Recent Episodes

How Charles Munn is Saving the Amazon

Charles Munn's quest to save the Amazon revolves around one theory: if people see the beauty in nature, they'll fight to protect it. So far, he's right. Over four decades, the American conservation biologist's ecotourism mission has helped restore 12 million acres of tropical forests in South America, including some of the most biologically diverse protected areas on earth. He talks to Here's the Thing about bird watching in the same garden as Einstein, using ecotourism as a conservation tool, and being the only safari guide in the world with a jaguar guarantee.

Audra McDonald is the "Luckiest Survivor in the World"

Much like the staggering beauty of her voice, Audra McDonald is impossible to ignore. The only artist to sweep all four acting categories at the Tony's, she's the most decorated Broadway star of all time. Reviews of her award-winning performances overflow with accolades, describing her stage presence as "spellbinding," "haunting," and "genius." But for the California native, things haven't always been easy. She talks to Alec about getting into Juilliard, making it on Broadway, and the suicide attempt that helped shape who she is today.

Yes, Jon Anderson's Musical Adventure Isn't Over

Many words can be used to describe singer-songwriter Jon Anderson; cautious is not one of them. Born in England in 1944, he began singing on his brother's daily route as a milkman before falling head first for rock n' roll. After meeting bassist Chris Squire in the late 1960s, he joined a rock group called Mabel Greer's Toy Shop—and the two left to form a band that was later renamed Yes. Now 72, he's sold more than 50 million albums worldwide. But for the adventurous Anderson—whose rendition of Goldfinger earned him the nickname "The Shirley Bassey of Rock," it's still all about the music.

'The Godfather' Made Sofia Coppola Protective of Actors

Before Sofia Coppola could talk, she was in movies, famously playing an infant in her father Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece The Godfather. She'd appear in the next one too, as an immigrant girl, but it was her role in The Godfather: Part III that caught the attention of the media—not in a good way. Critics claimed her novice performance "ruined" the final chapter of his series. It was a painful moment for Coppola, but one that gave her a firsthand look at the vulnerability of stars. Today she has the reputation of being "soothing" on set—a tactic that, given her multiple awards and accolades, is an effective one.

Philip Galanes Lies Like a Rug

Philip Galanes is a man of many words—which comes as no surprise to his family, who grew up listening to him read Dear Abby columns aloud. An avid reader and passionate wordsmith, he returned to his alma mater, Yale University, a few years after graduating to get his law degree. But decades into a career as an entertainment attorney, his life took a different path. Today, the brains behind the New York Times advice column Social Q's, he proffers advice on everything from ex-boyfriends to sibling rivalry. The common theme among them all: a little fibbing never hurts.

Joe Jackson Suffers No Fools

Combining three musical genres in your debut album may be risky, but Joe Jackson never cared about playing it safe. In 1979, his first LP Look Sharp! did just that—weaving pop, ska, and punk together into a sound all its own. With songs like Is She Really Going Out With Him? and Steppin Out, his pioneering sound helped usher in the New Wave era of the early 80s, and cement his place as music royalty. Currently on tour nationwide, Jackson talks with Alec Baldwin about "fake news," the instrument he considers to be medieval torture, and the reason he can no longer watch The Grammys.

Carly Simon Was Afraid of the Spotlight - and Still Is

It's hard, if not impossible, to imagine the 1970s without Carly Simon. After opening for Cat Stevens at LA's Troubadour in 1971, she gained near instant fame, winning a Grammy for Best New Artist that same year. The daughter of Richard L. Simon, co-founder of publishing house Simon & Schuster, she grew up surrounded by greatness. But if her childhood was peppered with celebrities, her adult life was dripping in them. By her mid-20s she'd meet Bob Dylan, duet with Mick Jagger, and marry James Taylor. Still, the shy New York native was a superstar in her own right, one who battled a stammer and a severe case of stage fright. She tells Alec Baldwin about conquering them both to become a musician who shaped an era. You can learn more about Carly's life in her 2015 memoir, Boys in the Trees.

Brian Reed Thought "S-Town" Could Only Ever Be a Cult Show

Good stories teach us about humankind, great ones change the way we see it. For many, S-Town — a seven episode series about an eccentric Alabama horologist named John B. McLemore — has done just that. Released on March 28, it reached critical acclaim near instantly, garnering 16 million downloads in the first seven days. For Brian Reed, the host and producer behind it, the reception has been thrilling. As the world continues to devour his masterpiece, Brian talks to Alec Baldwin about the email where it all began.

Tony Hendra on the Essentiality of Satire

British born comedian, actor, and writer Tony Hendra knows a thing or two about mocking politicians. As one of the first editors of the American humor magazine the National Lampoon, he helped perfect and popularize the type of satire that comedians still rely on to challenge the status quo. His move from the variety TV show circuit in the 60s to the parody news world in the 70s was a deliberate response to the election of Richard Nixon. As Donald Trump gives new urgency to an art form Hendra helped shape, he talks to Alec Baldwin about the monk who changed his life, the glory days of National Lampoon, and why it's a good thing that SNL is getting under the president's skin.

Bonus Episode: Alec Baldwin in the Hot Seat

Here's The Thing listeners are used to hearing Alec ask the questions, but for this bonus episode, he's the guest! To mark the publication of his new memoir, Nevertheless, Alec talk about money, drugs, career choices and family with Death, Sex & Money host Anna Sale. Stay tuned for Alec's conversation with comedian and satirist Tony Hendra – out on Tuesday!

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