KCRW's The Organist

KCRW's The Organist

From KCRW

The Organist podcast is a monthly experimental arts-and-culture program hosted and distributed by KCRW. Edited by the award-winning monthly magazine, Believer, published in San Francisco by McSweeney's, it includes reported stories, interviews, comic radio drama, reviews, and more. The scope of the podcast reflects that of the print edition: its contributors take a thoughtful approach to pop culture, along with an irreverent attitude toward the highbrow. From philosophy to daytime TV, from poetry to martial arts, the show scrutinizes and interrogates the world with an affectionate and rigorous intelligence. Pieces from the podcast grow out of stories in the magazine, and vice versa. Weaving together the voices of its contributors, which include the brightest talents in literature and the arts, The Organist is an elegant, impressionistic, funny, and sharp cultural magazine that itself becomes an object of inquiry, discussion, and wonder. The program is hosted by Andrew Leland and produced by Ross Simonini.More from KCRW's The Organist »

Most Recent Episodes

Episode 75: The Cool Gaze of Madame Realism

Lynne Tillman writes art criticism starring a fictional character, "Madame Realism," whose experience of art includes more than just the viewing of paintings. Here, Tillman takes the Organist on an expedition through the MoMA, and during a brief misunderstanding, along the sidewalk outside the MoMA...

Episode 75: The Cool Gaze of Madame Realism

Episode 74: It's Very Indian to Watch AbFab

Tommy Pico's first book is one long poem in the form of a text — call it an epic sext. But it doesn't just chronicle Pico's dalliances with "boys, burgers, and booze" — it rewrites the figure of the Indian, redefining what it means to be a Native American poet in the age of the Internet.

Episode 74: It's Very Indian to Watch AbFab

Episode 73: What We Talk about When We Talk about Two Bears High-Fiving

Hermann Rorschach's inkblot test has become ubiquitous in pop-culture as shorthand for both psychiatry and the subconscious. The first biography of Rorschach explores how our popular idea of the test gets it wrong.

Episode 73: What We Talk about When We Talk about Two Bears High-Fiving

Episode 72: Baptism of solitude: Paul Bowles's Morocco tapes

Driving around Morocco in the late 1950s with counterculture icon Paul Bowles at the wheel, with a case of hot Pepsi, a brick of hash, and a massive, state-of-the-art Ampex tape recorder in the backseat.

Episode 72: Baptism of solitude: Paul Bowles's Morocco tapes

Episode 71: Everybody Loves a Winner

The story of the guy who wrote a minor hit for a new label in 1961, watched everyone around him get famous singing his songs, and survived to write a great album about it all fifty years later.

Episode 70: A New Career in a New Town

SNL's Kyle Mooney on the art of crafting a three-dimensional bro impersonation and the ways in which the act of uploading a video to YouTube constitutes character development. Also: David J, the bassist of Bauhaus, follows a harmonica line from a jukebox playing "Groovin' With Mr. Bloe" all the way into David Bowie's afterlife.

Episode 69: The Testosterone Abyss

The website Weird Dude Energy is singularly devoted to collecting the most inexplicable male behavior on the internet. It's funny and weird, but if you study it carefully, it also raises some troubling and complicated questions: about contemporary masculinity and community—and about violence, misogyny, and Donald Trump.

Episode 68: The Metaphysics of Dub

The Nigerian-Jamaican- American writer Louis Chude-Sokei on black cyborgs, black blackface, and the intersections of race, technology, and robotics.

Episode 67: The Scientific Method of the Ramones

On Joey Ramone, Sigmund Freud, and our head-bangingly repetitive drive into the unknown. Plus: live music and conversation with Sonny Smith.

Episode 67: The Scientific Method of the Ramones

Episode 66: Toward an Architectural Theory of Hugs

A conversation with Craig Dykers, of the Norwegian architecture firm Snøhetta, on the invisible (but noisy) demands of building design.

Episode 66: Toward an Architectural Theory of Hugs

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