Latino USA Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.
Latino USA

Latino USA

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Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.More from Latino USA »

Most Recent Episodes

#1734 - Valley of Contrasts

The Coachella Valley in California is best known for its giant music festival. But there's another Coachella, and it has nothing to do with partying. The valley is divided into two parts. On the west side, there are beautiful homes with large yards. On the east side, you find the mobile homes of the mostly Mexican American residents who work in landscaping or agriculture. The differences between the two sides are stark, but there is one difference that truly sets them apart and has serious health consequences: access to clean water.

#1734 - Valley of Contrasts

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#1733 - Inside MS-13

President Trump has been talking a lot lately about MS-13, a street gang that started in California and spread to Central America. But what is the real story behind the gang? Latino USA takes a deep dive into MS-13, from the gang's origins in Los Angeles, to the economic motor that powers them in Central America, to a string of brutal murders in Long Island, New York. Plus, the other reason why the administration is talking about MS-13 these days: politics.

#1733 - Inside MS-13

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#1732 - Detained

The new administration has said that if you're in this country illegally, "you should be looking over your shoulder." On this episode, Latino USA looks at what is changing with immigration under President Trump and how those changes affect people in the real world. We hear about a man who was asked to buy his own plane ticket to get deported, look at tensions between local police and ICE in Texas, and hear from the director of a new office created by the president to support the victims of crimes committed by "illegal aliens."

#1732 - Detained

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#1731 - Secret Special Sauce

We all have that secret, special sauce. You know, that unique thing that we all bring to the table. This week we're showcasing a sampler of all types of secret sauces: from a secret hot sauce recipe that launched one man from obscurity to the high-roller life, to musician Gabriel Garzón Montano's special touch—so special that Drake sampled one of his songs. We also hear from a mother who is trying to teach her daughter how to make tortillas—just as her mom used to teach her—but stumbles along the way.

#1731 - Secret Special Sauce

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#1730 - The Stolen Child

Looking at the news these days, you might notice some common trends all over the world: a rise in populism and authoritarianism. In Argentina, we look at the history of trauma left behind by a military dictatorship in the 1970's, and trace one family's search for a missing son. And in Venezuela, violence and economic struggles worsen as protests against the government intensify. Plus, writer Amanda Taub talks about how authoritarianism can show up in any country—in the U.S., it might even be democratically elected.

#1730 - The Stolen Child

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#1729 - Rest in Segregation

We think of segregation as a thing of the past, but there are still many instances of unequal treatment—some more subtle than others. This week on Latino USA: a woman fights to bury her Latino husband after he was denied burial in a "whites only" cemetery in Texas. U.S. citizens who are the children of undocumented immigrants are being denied college scholarships in South Carolina. And Salma Hayek talks about her new film, Beatriz at Dinner, that takes on the question: what does it mean to be Latino in a white space? Language advisory: there is a racial slur that is not bleeped in the episode.

#1729 - Rest in Segregation

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#1728 - The Beautiful Game

Do you call it fútbol or soccer? Latino USA takes a look at the sport loved throughout Latin America and around the world, and what the teams we root for say about ourselves. When you come from both the U.S. and Mexico, what national team do you root for? Or what about if your national team is constantly losing—do you lose faith? And we take a look at women's soccer in the U.S., a world few Latinas reach.

#1728 - The Beautiful Game

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#1727 - Too Black, Too Latino

For this episode of Latino USA we take a look at Afro-Latinidad in 2017. What does it mean to be Afro-Latino and who gets to claim the title? We take a look at anti-blackness within the Latino community, and we speak with a panel of experts. Plus, we go back in history to learn about the "father of Black History," an Afro-Puerto Rican man named Arturo Schomburg. We also hear from Congressman Adriano Espaillat on his identity as well as from singer-songwriter Carolina Camacho about her latest album and what being Afro-Latino means to her.

#1727 - Too Black, Too Latino

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#1726 - Color Me Proud

In honor of Pride Month, Latino USA brings you stories of love, vulnerability, and resilience in LGBTQ communities of color. We'll hear the love story of gay migrants from El Salvador navigating the asylum system in Mexico and the story of a nine-year-old boy who got kicked out of the Boy Scouts after they found out that little Joe had been born as "Jody." Plus, an update on the San Antonio Four—a group of lesbian women falsely convicted of a gruesome crime. And, a look back at the Pulse nightclub shooting and how it affected one gay Puerto Rican man as he struggled to come out.

#1726 - Color Me Proud

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#1725 - Making a Man

In honor of Father's Day, Latino USA breaks down the different relationships between fathers and sons. From an adult son who reflects back on how his dad treated him like the little prince of the household to a teen dad whose masculinity was defined during his challenging journey to fatherhood. Plus, soul artist Nick Hakim on learning to fight his bully.

#1725 - Making a Man

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