All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

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Hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton spin new music from emerging bands and musical icons.More from All Songs Considered »

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Newport Folk 2016 Preview: Patti Smith, Flight Of The Conchords, More

On this special All Songs Considered episode, host Bob Boilen talks to Jay Sweet, the executive producer of the Newport Folk Festival. The two talk about the artists they're most excited to see, from the 20-year-old newcomer Raury to Flight Of The Conchords, Rayland Baxter, Margo Price, Joan Shelley and many more.

Newport Folk 2016 Preview: Patti Smith, Flight Of The Conchords, More

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All Songs +1: Amanda Palmer And Her Dad Discover Each Other In Song

For years, Amanda Palmer has been a provocative artist. But on her new record, she finds kinship with her father Jack — and gets to know him as they cover songs from his generation and hers.

All Songs +1: Amanda Palmer And Her Dad Discover Each Other In Song

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+1: My Cell Phone Rights At Shows Vs. Yours

We recently asked people what they think about new technology that can disable their phone cameras or otherwise lock away their devices while at concerts. The poll we put up was prompted by Apple's announcement of a patent on tech that would forcibly disable cellphone cameras at specific locations and by another company called Yondr that makes pouches to hold and lock away people's phones during shows.Now the results of our (relatively unscientific) poll are in and they surprised us.A slight majority said they're fine if their phone's camera is disabled (52 percent, to 48 percent who objected). And another slight majority (51 to 49 percent) said they're okay locking their phones away in a pouch that automatically locks shut while in a concert venue. By a wide, two-to-one margin, respondents further said they'd still go see a show even if they knew their camera phone would be locked up or disabled, though some said it depends on the show. Only 51 percent of respondents said they even want to take photos or videos at shows.On this +1 edition of All Songs Considered, hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton talk about the poll results and weigh in on the debate with their own arguments for and against granting people full access to their phones during concerts.

+1: My Cell Phone Rights At Shows Vs. Yours

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+1: Kishi Bashi Talks About New Album, Shares New Music

Kishi Bashi recently stopped by NPR's Washington, D.C., headquarters to announce his new album Sonderlust, which is due out Sept. 16 via Joyful Noise. It includes the lushly layered "Say Yeah," a rapturous mix of '70s soft rock, disco and synth pop. Hear that and more highlights from the album on this +1 edition of All Songs Considered.

Kishi Bashi Talks About New Album, Shares New Music

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A Lot Of Songs About Ice Cream

On July 15, 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation declaring July National Ice Cream Month, and called "upon the people of the United States to observe these events with appropriate ceremonies and activities." As this week marks that momentous occasion's 32nd anniversary, hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton see it as their civic duty to do an entire show about ice cream. To make this week's playlist, we asked you to tell us about your favorite songs and memories of ice cream. What we got was a lot of wonderful stories and a mix that includes everything from colorful cuts by Louis Prima and Jonathan Richman to Van Halen, Syd Barrett and plenty of novelty songs. But before we get too deep in the show, we attempt to make ice cream in the studio with the help of Allison Aubrey of NPR's The Salt. Featured Tracks: 1. Jonathan Richman, "Ice Cream Man," 2. Michael Hearst, "Ice Cream," 3. Louis Prima, "Banana Split For My Baby," 4. The Hungry Food Band, "Ice Cream Sandwiches," 5. Podington Bear, "Ice Cream Sandwiches," 6. Syd Barrett, "Love You," 7. Sarah McLachlan, "Ice Cream," 8. Van Halen, "Ice Cream Man," 9. Tom Waits, "Ice Cream Man," 10. Blur, "Ice Cream Man," 11. Weird Al Yankovic, "I Love Rocky Road"

A Lot Of Songs About Ice Cream

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Daniel Lanois, Deap Vally, Nonkeen, Pinegrove, More

On this week's All Songs Considered, we share new music from legendary producer and ambient pioneer, Daniel Lanois, and from the friends-for-life trio Nonkeen, whose new album comes in the aftermath of a "freak carousel accident." Also on the show is a shout-along emo track from Montclair, N.J.'s Pinegrove and a psych-pop track about never wanting to go outside from Morgan Delt, who recently signed with Sub Pop.But first, we take a moment of silence for the Weeknd, who lost his microphone, and explain to our intern that not everything on the Internet is real. 1. Nonkeen "Glow," Daniel Lanois "Heavy Sun," 3. Half Waif "Turn Me Around," 4. Pinegrove "Old Friends," 5. Morgan Delt "I Don't Wanna See What's Happening Outside," 6. Deap Vally "Royal Jelly"

Daniel Lanois, Deap Vally, Nonkeen, Pinegrove, More

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Your Favorite New Musicians Of 2016 (So Far)

It's only June and this year is already jam-packed with remarkable new artists who've released some of 2016's most memorable music. These are artists who released their very first songs or first full-length albums so far this year.Last week we asked for your picks for the best new artists from 2016's first half. We tallied the votes and have your top 10 listed below, alongside quotes that some of you submitted with your votes. The artists you picked cross genres, from the scuzz-y slacker rock of Lucy Dacus to the tender country music of Margo Price. But the thing that links them all, what you told us matters most to you, is a sense of authenticity.But first, Bob and Robin share their favorites: the wound-tight, propulsive sound of Weaves and the quiet, textured tunes of Ry X.1. Big Thief, 2. Margaret Glaspy, 3. Overcoats, 4. Whitney, 5. Maggie Rogers, 6. Lucy Dacus, 7. Mothers, 8. Margo Price, 9. Honeysuckle, 10. Japanese Breakfast

Your Favorite New Musicians Of 2016 (So Far)

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New Mix: Bellows, Cornelius, Keaton Henson, A-WA, The Wild Reeds, More

On this week's All Songs Considered we come full circle. Robin Hilton opens the show by looking back in time with a weird, psychedelic track by Cornelius from his long out-of-print, newly reissued album Fantasma. If the song doesn't justify itself, Bob Boilen provides an argument for looking back with a song by The Wild Reeds called "Everything Looks Better (In Hindsight)."Also on the show: We also play an electro-folk track by the Israeli sisters A-WA and a new song by Tiny Desk veterans Bellows. But first, Robin and Bob talk knee surgery.

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All Songs +1: Hozier Meets Tarzan, A New Song, Video And Conversation

We have a new song and an interview with Hozier. The song is a love song for the film "The Legend of Tarzan"

All Songs +1: Hozier Meets Tarzan, A New Song, Video And Conversation

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The Tallest Man On Earth, Lisa Hannigan, LP, More

On this week's All Songs Considered mix, we play songs about longing, loss, and healing, with premieres from The Tallest Man On Earth, pop singer LP and more.Co-host Robin Hilton opens the show with "Strange," a track LP wrote after realizing that what unites is how strange and wonderful we all are. Host Bob Boilen follows with a psychedelic track by two teenaged brothers from Hicksville, Long Island who go by the name The Lemon Twigs. We also hear from singer Adam Torres for the first time in nearly a decade and share a song by Charles Bradley that connects Black Sabbathwith James Brown. Plus: One of Robin's all-time favorite singer-songwriters, Chris Staples, is back with another heartbreakingly beautiful album called Golden Age, and we play a brand new song from The Tallest Man On Earth. We end with a song for those we've lost, "Prayer For The Dying" by Lisa Hannigan.But first, Robin tells us that he can, in fact, see stars from his house in the suburbs, shares why he loves letting his dog out right before bed and how it all ties in with this week's mix: 1. LP: "Strange," 2. The Lemon Twigs: "As Long As We're Together," 3. The Tallest Man On Earth: "Time Of The Blue," 4. Adam Torres: "Outlands," 5. Chris Staples: "Relatively Permanent," 6. Charles Bradley: "Changes," 7. Lisa Hannigan: "Prayer For The Dying"

The Tallest Man On Earth, Lisa Hannigan, LP, More

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