KERA's Think

KERA's Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainmeMore from KERA's Think »

Most Recent Episodes

The Surfing Life

[2015-08-03 13:00:00] After growing up in Southern California and Hawaii, William Finnegan spent the better part of his formative years chasing waves in the South Pacific, Australia, Africa and beyond. This hour, we'll talk with him about the allure of surfing, which he explores in his memoir Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life. (Penguin Press).

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48:17
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The DISD Superintendent Search

[2015-08-03 12:00:00] Dallas Independent School District is looking for a new superintendent after Mike Miles resigned in June. This hour, we'll talk about what his replacement will need to bring to the table – and why large school districts are notoriously difficult to manage – with Eric Cowan and Miguel Solis of the DISD school board and Rena Honea, president of Dallas' Alliance-AFT teachers association.

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48:22
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The Gangster Gat

[2015-07-30 13:00:00] Seemingly every classic gangster film of the 1930s featured a tough guy clinging to the side of a getaway car while filling the streets with bullets from his Tommy gun. This hour, we'll talk about John Thompson's original intent for the submachine gun – and the ongoing debate it sparked – with Dallas author Karen Blumenthal, author of Tommy: The Gun That Changed America (Roaring Brook Press.).

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48:17
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The Aftermath Of Sandra Bland

[2015-07-30 12:00:00] When Sandra Bland, a black motorist, was pulled over by a state trooper in Waller County, Texas, the confrontation escalated quickly. This hour, we'll talk about the relationship between African Americans and law enforcement with UNT assistant journalism professor Meredith Clark, Lancaster Chief of Police Cheryl Wilson and Fort Worth artist Christopher Blay.

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48:20
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Frame By Frame

[2015-07-29 13:00:00] Matthew Diffee's cartoons have routinely made the pages of The New Yorker for more than a decade. This hour, we'll talk with Diffee about what separates the comics that make it in from the ones that don't – and about packing the maximum amount of humor into a single frame. His new book is Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People (Scribner).

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48:15
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The Return Of Harper Lee

[2015-07-29 12:00:00] Earlier this month, HarperCollins published Go Set a Watchman, the novel Harper Lee called the "parent" of To Kill a Mockingbird. This hour, we'll talk about how the book has us reconsidering Atticus Finch and the rest of the Mockingbird universe with Thomas DiPiero, dean of the Dedman College of Humanities at SMU. DiPiero reviewed Watchman for the New York Post.

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48:15
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Fakers, Forgers And Frauds

[2015-07-28 13:00:00] Art auctions continue to set records for the sales of masterworks. And all that money changing hands is irresistible to con men. This hour, we'll talk about some of history's most notorious scams – and how they were pulled off – with Anthony Amore, author of The Art of the Con: The Most Notorious Fakes, Frauds, and Forgeries in the Art World (St. Martin's Press).

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48:18
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25 Years Of The ADA

[2015-07-28 12:00:00] The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination of millions of disabled Americans. Nearly 25 years to the day of President George H.W. Bush signing the ADA, we'll talk this hour about its unlikely path from idea to law with Lennard J. Davis, author of Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights (Beacon Press).

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48:21
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Rebooting An Aging Mind

[2015-07-27 13:00:00] When Patricia Marx's age was beginning to betray her memory, she decided to be proactive. This hour, we'll talk to the New Yorker staff writer about her humorous search for ways to curb the mind's decline, which she writes about in Let's Be Less Stupid: An Attempt to Maintain My Mental Faculties (Twelve).

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48:16
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How Identical Twins Became Fraternal

[2015-07-27 12:00:00] Imagine being separated at birth from your identical twin and raised alongside your assumed fraternal twin. That's exactly what happened to four infants in Colombia. This hour, we'll talk about how decades later the young men sorted out the error with Susan Dominus, who tells their story in The New York Times magazine, and psychologist Yesika Montoya, who studied the twins' unique experience.

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48:20
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