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August 18, 2017: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 18, 2017 full broadcast, we get the latest on terror attacks in Spain from NPR's Frank Langfitt in Barcelona. Also, St. Joseph, Missouri — population 75,000 — is expecting more than 100,000 visitors for the solar eclipse on Monday. We hear how the city and its residents are getting ready for a total eclipse of the heartland. And the bell in the British Parliament's iconic clock tower has been ringing since 1859, but it will fall silent on Monday. The BBC's Rich Preston tells us why.

August 18, 2017: Hour 2

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August 18, 2017: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 18, 2017 full broadcast, we get an update from the BBC's Bahman Kalbasi on the latest in Spain, after police moved to counter a second terrorist attack early Friday morning in Cambrils, southwest of Barcelona. Also, NPR's Ron Elving and CNN's Juana Summers join us to take a look at the week in politics, which was dominated by reaction to President Trump's comments on violence last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. And will cloud cover obstruct your view of Monday's total solar eclipse? We take a look at the forecast with Jen Carfagno of The Weather Channel.

August 18, 2017: Hour 1

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August 17, 2017: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 17, 2017 full broadcast, we get an update on a van slamming into pedestrians on Thursday in Barcelona's historic Las Ramblas district. Also, Vice News Tonight correspondent Elle Reeve spent last weekend embedded with the organizers of the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virgina. She joins Here & Now's Robin Young to describe what she saw. And fresh local corn is in season at farmers markets all over the country, and our resident chef Kathy Gunst has been taking advantage. She joins us with recipes and ideas, from a sautéed corn salad to buttermilk cornbread.

August 17, 2017: Hour 2

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August 17, 2017: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 17, 2017 full broadcast, we take a look at President Trump once again commenting on the effort to remove Confederate statues around the country, and why White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is making headlines Thursday, with NPR's Ron Elving. Also, NPR Asia editor Nishant Dahiya joins us with his picks for books that best illuminate the topic of partition, 70 years after British-ruled India was divided into India and Pakistan. And as sky-watchers look up to observe the total solar eclipse on Monday, what will animals be doing below? We check in with Vicki Croke, host of WBUR's The Wild Life blog.

August 17, 2017: Hour 1

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August 16, 2017: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 16, 2017 full broadcast, political analysts Angela Rye and Paris Dennard join us to continue discussion on President Trump's Tuesday news conference in which he again blamed "both sides" for deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Also, we hear the latest from the Philippines, where police killed more than 30 people in drug raids over a 24-hour period this week, thought to be the single-largest death toll in one day in the controversial drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte last year. And we prepare for the upcoming celestial event with our latest DJ Session: a soundtrack to the solar eclipse.

August 16, 2017: Hour 2

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August 16, 2017: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 16, 2017 full broadcast, NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins us to discuss reaction to President Trump's Tuesday press conference, in which he once again said there's blame on "both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville over the weekend. Also, as newsrooms around the country turn to computer algorithms, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd got to thinking about his own future in the business. He takes us to the Washington Post newsroom, where a news-writing algorithm is already producing stories. And we dig into the history of white supremacist groups in the U.S. with historians Ed Ayers and Nathan Connolly, co-hosts of the podcast BackStory.

August 16, 2017: Hour 1

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August 15, 2017: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 15, 2017 full broadcast, we take a look at what more CEOs leaving President Trump's business council could mean for the Trump administration with MSNBC's Ali Velshi. Also, before science was able to explain how and why solar eclipses happened, civilizations came up with their own interpretation. We take a historical journey through the mythology, history and science of eclipses with author Bryan Brewer. And a new study in Kentucky is raising alarms about teens' mental health in the state.

August 15, 2017: Hour 2

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August 15, 2017: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 15, 2017 full broadcast, we continue to discuss the political reverberations from the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, including news of additional CEOs resigning from President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Also, author Peter Brannen examines the five mass extinctions in the history of the Earth in his new book "The Ends of the World." He joins the program to share what happened to cause these crises and to determine what our future might bring. And, we speak with the founder of a Facebook group for "elder orphans" — those over the age of 55 living without a spouse or kids.

August 15, 2017: Hour 1

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August 14, 2017: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 14, 2017 full broadcast, we continue coverage of news from Charlottesville, Virginia, speaking with Kerry Haynie of Duke University about race and the White House's response to violence over the weekend. Also, Oren Segal of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism joins us to take a look at the white supremacist groups behind the rally. Plus, we look at how the Pakistan-India partition has been portrayed by India's film industry through the years. And we hear from the author of a new book on the Treaty of Versailles about how the agreement was assembled and why its legacy has been mixed.

August 14, 2017: Hour 2

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August 14, 2017: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 14, 2017 full broadcast, we get the latest news and reaction from Charlottesville, Virgina, in the wake of violence between white supremacist groups and counter-protesters at a rally over the weekend. Also, in a few weeks, teenagers will stumble bleary eyed and yawning into middle and high schools to beat that early morning bell. But in California, that could change by 2020. And we hear more about the state of Indiana stepping in to rescue a privately run highway project that's two years behind schedule and far from complete.

August 14, 2017: Hour 1

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