Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

From KCBX

Join Lowell Thomas Award winning travel correspondent Tom Wilmer as he shares his travel experiences from across America and around the world.More from Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer »

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Benicia California's thriving Arsenal Artist Community

The little town of Benicia, California is a big time center for the arts and artists. In addition to an abundance of downtown galleries, there's an entire neighborhood expressly for artists and artisans. How the town came to be a magnet for the arts community was propelled subsequent to the closure of the US military's Benicia Arsenal back in 1964. The arsenal had been a key player in America's national defense since before the Civil War. When a developer proposed to repurpose the former military installation as an artist live-work community, his idea was met with enthusiasm. Today there are more than 50 artists who maintain live work studios in former military warehouse, a literal--From Swords to Plowshares—transformation. Join Correspondent Tom Wilmer at the old arsenal for a conversation with key players in the Arts Benicia world. We'll meet up with Mark Eanes in his combination studio residence. Eanes is an instructor at the California College of Arts in Oakland, California, and an Arts Benicia Board Member. Later on, Larnie Fox, a former Executive Director of Arts Benicia, and Jeff Tover, an Arts Benicia Board Member and working artist, will join the conversation about the artists' life at the Arsenal and Arts Benicia's ongoing programs that include exhibitions, classes for adults, art experiences for kids, open studios and more. Funding for the Lowell Thomas Award winning travel show, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer is provided by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or: stitcher.com player.fm pure.comUK PodcastsDE(Germany)

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22:29
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Benicia—California's 1853-54 State Capital

Within two years of the discovery of Gold at Sutter's Mill in the Sierra's, California became America's 31st state on September 9, 1850. The provisional Capital had been in Monterey, but upon Statehood the first state capital was located in San Jose. Less than a year later it was moved to Vallejo, but a lack housing led the government to move the capital to Benicia in 1853. At the time, Benicia was an economic powerhouse and was the state's third incorporated city. But a combination of political power plays and the fact that Sacramento was more centrally located to the center of the state's economic activity in the nearby Sierra foothill goldfields led the legislature to move the capital to Sacramento in the spring of 1854. Benicia' classic Greek Revival, sandstone and brick State Capital building, with fluted columns remains as California's only surviving pre-Sacramento State House. Situated just off First Street in the heart of old town Benicia, the old Capital has been restored to original condition, including vintage desks, quill pens, spittoons, and whale oil lamps on the walls. A California State Historic Landmark, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Capital is a step back in time to the heyday of the California Gold Rush era. Come along and join State Park docent, Mike Kaplan for a walking tour of the old capital. Benicia is located 35 miles from San Francisco between San Pablo Bay and Suisun Bay. For further information about the historic Benicia State Capital State Historic Landmark and historic Benicia, log on to visitbenicia.org Funding for the Lowell Thomas Award winning travel show, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer is provided by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or: stitcher.com player.fm pure.comUK PodcastsDE(Germany)

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14:01
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Discover Historic Benicia, California

One of California's first incorporated cities is Benicia, situated on the waterfront of the Carquinez Strait at the mouth of the Sacramento Delta region. It's less than 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, but this historic small town is worlds apart. It was firmly established before the advent of the 1848 California Gold Rush, and by 1853 it served as California's third State Capital. 13 months later, the Capital was relocated to Sacramento, but the town continued to thrive as a rail head for the Transcontinental Railroad, and a century long legacy as the location of the military's West Coast Arsenal. I'm correspondent, Tom Wilmer, come along and join me for a visit with Nancy Martinez, the Executive Director of the Benicia Main Street Program, for a walking tour down First Street. We'll also stop in for a visit with Leah Shelhorn, owner of Studio 41 a showcase of local and regionally crafted art.As an aside, I belatedly learned that old-timers have their own distinctive pronunciation of their town's name. Journeys of Discovery is funded by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes Player.fm Stitcher.com Pure.com/uk

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19:12
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Museum of Pacific War & Marine Corps' National Museum

Join correspondent, Tom Wilmer in Fredericksburg, Texas for a visit with the 33rd Commandant of the Marine Corps, Four Star General, Michael Haggee at the National Museum of the Pacific War which is also the home of the Admiral Nimitz Museum. We'll then head over to Quantico, Virginia for a visit with Mike Miller, the Marine Corps' archivist and historian at the National Museum of the Marine Corps and Heritage Center. Funding for Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer provided by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes Stitcher.com player.com

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17:34
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Benefits of "Travel Writer's Mindset" with Perry Garfinkel

Join Associate Producer, Laurie McAndish King for a conversation with New York Times contributing travel writer Perry Garfinkel on the Lowell Thomas Award-winning podcast, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer. What do travel writing and Buddhism have in common? How can a "travel writer's mindset" extend your vacation and make it more enjoyable? Why does a professional travel writer recommend modeling after the masters—and stealing freely? (And what did Perry Garfinkel steal from Woody Allen?) To learn all this and more, join correspondent Laurie McAndish King in Berkeley, California, for a conversation with Perry Garfinkel, longtime New York Times contributor, travel writing teacher, and author of Buddha or Bust: In Search of Truth, Meaning, Happiness, and the Man Who Found Them All and Travel Writing for Profit and Pleasure. Perry will also give us a preview of his upcoming travel writing workshop (August 30 – September 5, 2015) on Martha's Vineyard.

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30:34
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Armenian Genocide-- a Conversation with Amy Hoogasian

Join correspondent, Tom Wilmer in San Francisco for a conversation with Amy Hoogasian, as she talks about the Armenian Genocide in Turkey, 1915-1918. Her passionate quest for Turkey to acknowledge their genocidal policies and actions against the Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire a century ago was inculcated as a child when her grandparents shared horrific memories of abuse and mass murder at the hands of the Turks. Amy Hoogasian hails from Chicago and has practiced law for twenty years in the areas of immigration, corporate and environmental law. She moved to San Francisco, California, when she was appointed to a distinguished position within the United States government. Subscribe to Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer on NPR.ORG's podcast page or iTunes, Podcasts.de (Germany) Stitcher.com, player.fm, pure.com (UK)Funding for the Lowell Thomas Award-winning travel shos is provided by Hawiian Reforestation Initiative

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23:44
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International Chardonnay Symposium

Join Correspondent, Tom Wilmer as he explores the world of Chardonnay and The International Chardonnay Symposium, May 28-30, with Winemakers Eric Johnson of Talley Vineyards and Mike Sinor of Sinor La Vallee, along with Wine Director, Robin Puricello of Foremost Wine Bar & Restaurant in San Luis Obispo. You'll hear about the amazing panel discussions, winemaker dinners and two grand tastings coming to Pismo Beach and Avila Beach, California this month. listen to the show on the Lowell Thomas Award-winning Podcast, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, produced by NPR affiliate KCBX, with funding provided by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative.

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22:43
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Aurora, Nebraska's Captivating Plainsman Museum

Museums can be static attics—dusty archives of our history, or they can be amazingly engaging and dynamic places with interactive, hands-on experiences for kids and adults alike. When I think of really cool museums, I think of places like the Smithsonian and the Air & Space Museum, the Field in Chicago, or the Natural History Museum in LA. But I spend most of my time exploring American heartland towns and villages, rather than urban centers. And I suppose it's my own mental bias, I just don't expect to find incredible museums in small town America. I have been repeatedly blindsided by discovering truly world-class showcases of American life hunkered in little towns far removed from the nearest urban center. When I visited the rural farming community of Aurora, Nebraska, two hours west of Omaha on Interstate 80, it was a pleasant surprise to discover the Plainsman Museum that engagingly chronicles the region's evolution over the past 150 years. Come along and join me for a visit with Museum Director, Megan Sharp. Funding for Journeys of Discovery provided by Hawaiian Reforestation Initiative Subscribe to the Lowell Thomas Award-winning podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.com

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9:44
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Texas Rose Rustler—"If Dead People Can Grow Roses, Anyone Can"

Mike Shoup, the owner of the Antique Rose Emporium in Independence, Texas has been propagating and selling antique roses since the late 1970s. Some of his most prized and coveted roses were virtually extinct. But he found neglected "survivor" heirloom varieties still growing in old pioneer cemeteries—even though no one had cared for them for decades. Shoup commenced cemetery forays to secure cuttings... and thus was born his knick name, "The Rose Rustler". A bonus of his antique varieties is they are super aromatic. Shoup explained that most hybrid roses are bred for color and appearance, and the aromatics are often greatly diminished. Come along and Join Mike at his Emporium as he shares his passion as a Rosarian, and how to maintain healthy roses, organically, without utilizing pesticides. Listen to Mike Shoup on Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, the Lowell Thomas Award winning podcast featured on NPR.ORG

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15:40
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Exploring Morro Bay California

I've lived on the California Central Coast since 1978, with more than 15 years anchored in Morro Bay. I still savor the Bay and Estuary and majestic Morro Rock with the same awe and wonder as the day I first arrived. A bonus of the place is the diversity of things to do and see. Savoring seaside Fish and chips is a definite part of the fabric, as is kayaking, beach walking, watching the pelicans soar, loons calling out, otters poking their curious heads up like periscopes, and seals and lumbering sea lions scooting around the bay. At the far end of town is the Morro Bay State Park. In addition to the State Campground, where many vacationers reserve their campsite months in advance, the State Park is also host to the County owned Morro Bay Golf Course—affectionately dubbed Poor-Man's Pebble beach. One of the Park's lesser known gems is the Natural History Museum, perched on a bay front rock promontory just steps from the golf links, and campground. My friend, Brent Haugen, Director of the Morro Bay Tourism Bureau and I visited with Rouvaishayana the State Park's Manager of the Natural History Museum. We then stopped in for a visit with Mike Samaniego, the Head Golf Pro at the Morro Bay Golf Course and then headed down to the Embarcadero for a visit with the owner of Sub Sea Tours, located in front of Marina Square.In case you're visiting from out of the area, or know someone who's planning a trip to the Central Coast, the Morro Bay Tourism Bureau has just launched their Adventure Pass, good for three days of discounted fees for a myriad of adventures from kayaking, to harbor cruises, wine tasting, yogurt, chocolates, golfing and lots more. Funding for Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, a weekly podcast on NPR.ORG is provided by Hawaiian Legacy Reforestation Initiative Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes

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17:50
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