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Most Recent Episodes

Former Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren's 'Journey Across the American-Israeli Divide'

Michael Oren is ruffling feathers from Washington D.C. to Jerusalem with a new memoir chronicling his tenure as the Israeli ambassador to the United States. Released just days before the deadline for a U.S.-backed nuclear agreement with Iran, "Ally: My Journey Across the American-Israeli Divide," offers a biting critique of President Obama's priorities in the Middle East and a behind-the-scenes look at the world of international diplomacy.

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Americans With Disabilities Act Turns 25

Twenty-five years ago, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the world's first comprehensive law guaranteeing equal rights to individuals with disabilities. But the ADA has had critics, particularly in California, where state laws make it easier for plaintiffs to sue businesses over violations and to collect damages. We'll discuss the history of the landmark law, its ongoing relevance and new efforts to protect and expand rights for people with disabilities.

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Kim Kardashian West 'Broke' the Internet. Will She Break Public Radio?

When NPR's quiz show "Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me" featured Kim Kardashian West as its weekly celebrity guest, listeners were not pleased. They flooded NPR with complaints, threatening to pull their donations and calling Kardashian West "a shameless strumpet." The reality TV star's upcoming appearance at a Commonwealth Club event has further spurred the online debate. In light of her controversial NPR appearance, we'll explore the question: Who belongs on public radio?

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Strict Vaccine Requirements Pass California Assembly

Amid the intense debate about parents' rights versus public safety, the California State Assembly passed a bill on Thursday requiring that almost all children be vaccinated. The new law would eliminate all non-medical exemptions including those for personal and religious beliefs. Unvaccinated kids would be refused admission to both public and private day cares and schools. The bill now goes back to the State Senate for approval before moving on to the governor's desk.

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Supreme Court Rules on Redistricting, Lethal Injection and EPA Air Pollution Limits

The Supreme Court ruled Monday on an Arizona redistricting case, upholding the redistricting commission's power to draw congressional maps. We'll discuss this and other Monday decisions.

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After Charleston: Homegrown Hate Groups Under Scrutiny

Alleged Charleston shooter Dylann Roof credits his racist beliefs in part to a right-wing group, the Council of Conservative Citizens. The Council has donated to presidential campaigns of Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Rick Santorum. All three candidates quickly distanced themselves from the group. We'll discuss the history and influence of white supremacist groups in the U.S. and what role, if any, they play in radicalizing homegrown terrorists.

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U.S. Supreme Court Strikes Down Bans on Same-Sex Marriage

On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court made history by ruling that the Constitution guarantees the right to same-sex marriage nationwide. Gay men and women "ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law," wrote Justice Anthony Kennedy in the majority opinion. "The Constitution grants them that right." San Franciscans waving rainbow flags outside City Hall tearfully hugged each other after hearing the news, which came right before the San Francisco Pride Celebration and Parade weekend. We discuss the 5-4 decision and what this means for the country.

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Former Stanford Dean on 'How to Raise an Adult'

As the former dean of freshmen and undergraduate advising at Stanford University, Julie Lythcott-Haims had to deal with the consequences of parenting, both good and bad. Drawing on the latest research and her own experience as a mother, Lythcott-Haims categorizes modern parenting into three styles: overprotecting, over-directing and hand-holding. Join us as we discuss the best ways to raise successful adults.

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Supreme Court Votes to Uphold Affordable Care Act Provision

On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a contentious portion of the Affordable Care Act dealing with subsidies. The 6-3 vote was a key win for the Obama administration, thus allowing it to continue offering tax subsidies not just in states with their own health insurance exchanges, but also in states where the insured rely on the federal government exchange.

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New Bike Plan Envisions Silicon Valley as Copenhagen

Cycling between suburban residential areas and sprawling corporate campuses in Silicon Valley can be stressful and risky. Google, along with regional bike advocates, recently released a plan for European-style, bikeable streets around the tech-heavy North Bayshore area of Mountain View. Supporters hope the plan will be a model for encouraging and increasing bike commuting throughout the region.

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