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KQED's live call-in program presents wide-ranging discussions of local, state, national and international issues, as well as in-depth interviews.More from KQED's Forum »

Most Recent Episodes

Stanford Project Unearths Personal Histories of Chinese Railroad Workers

The Transcontinental Railroad has been dubbed a feat of 19th century engineering and has been credited with opening California up to trade. Despite the importance of the project, little is known about the individual lives of the 12,000 Chinese immigrants who laid the track between Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada. Now, 150 years after Chinese workers began working on the railroad, we look back on the contributions of those workers and learn about the Stanford project that's piecing together their personal stories.

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Study Questions Aggressive Cancer Treatments for Terminal Patients

A new study suggests that chemotherapy given to terminal cancer patients who aren't expected to live beyond six months may do more harm than good. We'll discuss the pros and cons of chemotherapy for terminal patients, especially when weighed against the effects on quality of life. We'll also look at the high rate of intensive treatments used in the final months for teens dying of cancer.

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New Documentary Examines the Role of 'White People' in Race Dialogue

A new documentary from by MTV titled "White People" asks white millennials to take a closer look at how they view race. "I don't think we can have a conversation about race in America anymore and not include white people in the conversation," said journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, who produced the film. How can we have conversations about race that are both welcoming and honest? What are your most meaningful conversations about race, and who were they with? What circumstances fostered them, and what did you learn?

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Richmond Approves California's First Rent Control Ordinance in 30 Years

The Richmond City Council voted this week to enact eviction protection and rent control rules that will limit rent increases to that of the Consumer Price Index for the region, or about 2 percent annually. Supporters say the rules, which will go into effect December 1, are necessary to stem evictions and displacement. Opponents say the protections unfairly burden landlords and are too costly to the city. We look at the economics and politics of rent control.

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Travel Writer Pico Iyer's Advice for Adventure: Stay Still

"In an age of constant movement, nothing is so urgent as sitting still." That is Pico Iyer's conclusion in his new book "The Art of Stillness." The longtime travel writer, who has trekked to countries as far-ranging as North Korea and Ethiopia, is now making the case for mindfulness and rest. In an age of constant connectedness, Iyer writes that staying put (and turning off your phone) is an exciting prospect, and may be more necessary than ever.

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David Gergen on Political Gridlock and the 2016 Presidential Campaign

CNN political analyst David Gergen was an adviser to Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Clinton. He joins us to discuss the 2016 presidential race, including why, or perhaps how, Donald Trump can be holding the lead in Republican polls, the on-going political gridlock over the Iran deal and more.

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The Kids of Working Moms Are All Right

If you're a working mom who feels guilty for being away from your kids, there's good news. A recent Harvard Business School study shows that women who had mothers in the work force are more likely to have jobs, supervisory responsibility and earn higher wages than women raised by mothers who stayed at home. Similarly, men who had working mothers are more likely to do household chores and spend more time caring for family members. We'll discuss the latest research on the effect of maternal employment on gender disparities at work and at home.

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'The Really Big One' That Will Hit the Pacific Northwest

There's a fault line that should strike greater fear in your heart than the San Andreas or the Hayward. The Cascadia Subduction Zone runs off the U.S. West Coast from Cape Mendocino in California north to Vancouver Island in Canada. The 700-mile fault zone has the potential to unleash such an enormous earthquake and tsunami that, in the words of one expert, "everything west of Interstate 5 will be toast." The New Yorker's Kathryn Schulz joins us to outline what's at stake. Her article "The Really Big One" appears in the magazine's latest issue. We'll also hear from a Bay Area seismologist about the fault's implications for California.

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Activists, Residents Fight Plan to Ship Coal Through Oakland

Environmentalists and city leaders are fighting a proposal to let a planned cargo terminal on a portion of the old Oakland Army Base become a way station for coal. Those who oppose the plan cite concerns about air quality and the effects of coal burning on climate change. The developer of the project, Oakland businessman Phil Tagami, says no commitments have been made to any particular commodity.

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Steven Anthony Jones Brings Legendary Supreme Court Justice to Life in 'Thurgood'

Thurgood Marshall was a game-changer in many ways. The great-grandson of a slave, he grew up to argue the historic desegregation case "Brown v. Board of Education" and eventually became the first African-American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. His story is the subject of a one-man play, "Thurgood," now in its Bay Area debut being staged by the Lorraine Hansberry Theatre. The show features artistic director Steven Anthony Jones. Jones joins us to talk about playing such a formidable character and about running one of the Bay Area's most prominent theater companies.

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