WFUV's Cityscape

WFUV's Cityscape

From WFUV On-Air: Music Discovery Starts Here

An inside look at the people, places and spirit of New York City and its surroundings, with host George Bodarky.More from WFUV's Cityscape »

Most Recent Episodes

Independence Day

A lot of us associate Independence with America's independence from British rule, but there are plenty of ways to look at it. On this week's edition of Cityscape, we're looking at independence from various perspectives, including a kid's independence from the diaper. We'll also talk with the executive director of an organization that works to help disabled New Yorkers live as independently as possible. We'll learn about the famous Macy's 4thof July Fireworks from its creative director. And we'll delve into New York City's Revolutionary War history with a tour guide who knows all about it.

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Strike a Chord: Kids Making a Difference

WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign is shining a spotlight on kids who care. The campaign highlights kids making a difference in their communities through volunteer efforts. We produced this panel discussion in conjunction with BronxNet Television. Our guests include: 8-year-old Maeve Ryan who is involved with a project called Operation Christmas Child; 15-year-old Sean Martin, the founder of Kids Adopt a Shelter; and Naomi Hirabayashi with DoSomething.org.

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"Seeing Home"

Baseball took his sight, but gave him a life. That's what Ed Lucas says about the sport in a book he penned with his son, Christopher, called Seeing Home: The Ed Lucas Story — A Blind Broadcaster's Story of Overcoming Life's Greatest Obstacles. Ed Lucas might not be as familiar a name in baseball history as Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio, but his story is no less remarkable. Ed and his son Christopher are our guests on this week's Cityscape.

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Exploring Red Hook

Red Hook, Brooklyn is one of those New York City neighborhoods that might fall under the radar. It's a waterfront community that's a more than 20-minute walk from the nearest subway station. Some people might only know it because it's home to an IKEA. But, there's a lot more than a popular furniture store to explore in Red Hook. On this week's edition of Cityscape, we're spending time in Red Hook.

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NYC's Meow

When you think of cats in New York City – what comes to mind? For some people, it might the Broadway show Cats. But, the Big Apple is home to a lot of real-life felines. According the New York City Economic Development Corporation, 500,000 cats live in the city as pets. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking all about cats. Our guests include the creator of the Felines of New York blog;a co-founder of a so-called cat cafe on Manhattan's Lower East Side known as Meow Parlour; and someone who knows all about the big cats at the Bronx Zoo.

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50 Years of New York City Landmarks

Imagine a skyscraper in place of Grand Central Terminal, or construction crews gutting the interior of the famed Radio City Music Hall. It's been five decades since New York City Mayor Robert Wagner signed a measure to help preserve the city's history. A new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York explores the roots and impact of the city's landmarks law. It's called Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks. The exhibit is complemented by a book of the same name. The guys behind both are Donald Albrecht, the Museum of the City of New York's Curator for Architecture and Design and Andrew Dolkart, the Director of Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University. They're our guests on this edition of Cityscape.

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Wildlife in the Concrete Jungle

A lot of people who visit New York hit up the Bronx or Central Park zoos to get an up-close look at wildlife. After all, the only wild animals the city is most known for are rats and pigeons. But, the fact of the matter is the city is teaming with wildlife. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring wildlife in the concrete jungle – from spotted salamanders to parrots.

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Mom and Pop Shops

It's become an all too familiar story for a lot of New Yorkers. Their favorite dive bar or cafe is turned into a 7-Eleven or Apple Store. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with folks about the plight of mom and pop shops in an increasingly corporate retail environment.

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The Bug Show

How about a side of crickets with that burger? Might sound uninviting here in the United States. But, eating insects is common to cultures in many parts of the world. On this week's Cityscape we'll delve deeper into the idea of insect-eating and its potential benefits for the planet. Our guests include Lou Sorkin, an entomologist at the Museum of Natural History and David George Gordon, the author of the Eat-A-Bug Cookbook. We'll also talk with a researcher who studied what ants are eating in the Big Apple, and found some of them have a penchant for junk food.

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On the Water

Spring is in the air in New York City. And after a long, cold winter, it's finally safe to give some serious consideration to spending time on the water. And while sometimes it's easy to forget, the Big Apple is surrounded by H2O. On this week's Cityscape, we're visiting the last wooden barge in New York Harbor, and checking out the sailing scene on City Island.

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