Conversations in the Digital Age

Conversations in the Digital Age

From WNYE

Digital Age, covers politics, media and the way we live in the Digital Age.More from Conversations in the Digital Age »

Most Recent Episodes

Has the Met Museum Gone Digital?

The iconic Metropolitan Museum of Art has posted a substantial part of its collection online, and showcased its art treasures one-by-one in a series of blogs called “82nd and Fifth.” Sree Sreenivasan, the Met’s first chief digital officer, tells Jim that there is a vital connection between the virtual and the traditional bricks-and-mortar museum

 

 

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Is the Nuke Deal with Iran a Good Deal?

Was it a good idea for the US to make an interim deal with Iran even if they didn’t totally agree to stop enriching? Council on Foreign Relations President Emeritus Les Gelb tells Jim that any slowdown in Iran’s nuclear program is meaningful, and what we are giving them in return in relaxation of sanctions costs us very little.

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Will TWRRL Be the Next Twitter?

More than one million apps on your iPhone, and they keep coming. Digital developer Harriet Edelman tells Jim Zirin of a new mobile video app called TWRRL, which allows you to insert yourself within a cartoon animation, story or skit. It’s hilarious, you’ll never have a better time, and even Jim got in on the act with two barking dogs.

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Was Brazil Worth Spying On?

Snowden’s revelations prompted Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff

to cancel a planned state visit to Washington to meet with Obama.

She even threatened  to remove Brazil from the world wide web.

Latin American expert Julia Sweig tells Jim Zirin that the  motivation

for the spying is inexplicable, and that the damage to our relationship

with a friendly neighboring country is incalculable    

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How Do We Protect Our Children from Sexting's Dire Dangers?

Sexting, the transmission of intimate photos or messages from one cell phone to another, is sweeping the country. Journalist Nina Burleigh, author of a compelling Rolling Stone article entitled “Sexting, Shame and Suicide,” tells Jim that the sexting compulsion, which brought down Anthony Weiner has profoundly dangerous implications for today’s teenagers.

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Will the Debt Ceiling Debate Become D?j? Vu All Over Again?

Congress approved an 11th-hour deal to raise the debt ceiling, in the face of dire threats that not to do so would bring down the global economy. But, instead of resolving the crisis, the lawmakers merely kicked the can down the road four months. Financial Times chief economics commentator, Martin Wolf, tells Jim that the US debt ceiling is “the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb aimed by the US at itself.”

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Are We Doing Enough to Take on Iran?

 

As we embark on our first bilateral negotiations with Iran in

35 years, the question arises whether Tehran is sincere about a

deal or is merely playing for time while it perfects nuclear weapons.

Former State Department Legal Adviser Abraham Sofaer tells Jim Zirin

we must employ the same policy that worked with the former Soviet

Union—engage Iran diplomatically, while forcefully confronting

Iranian attempts to project power beyond its borders.

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? Is America's Global Influence in Decline??

Foreign affairs experts are worried that the Russian deal on Syria,

the Snowden affair, Internet balkanization, and the government

shutdown have combined to undermine international perceptions

of US leadership. Council on Foreign Relations Studies Director

Jim Lindsay tells  Jim Zirin that we will need to do much to regain

our position of global primacy.

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Do We Have an Adequate Mental Healthcare Safety Net?

With recent mass killings at Newtown and in Washington,

legislators have called for tighter gun control. But have we

focused enough on the shooters? Aaron Alexis, the DC Navy

Yard shooter, sought professional help, but doctors missed the

signals he would do serious harm. Leading psychiatrist Herb Pardes

tells Jim how we have failed our obligation to the mentally ill, and

says what can be done about it.

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Was Cairo Any Less Turbulent in 1941?

In 1941 Cairo was a boiling cauldron with Nazi spies, agitators, Muslim Brothers, refugee Jews, Brits and Americans all swimming around in a stew of intrigue. Egyptian expat, Juliana Maio tells Jim  about her bestselling novel "City of the Sun" and what her research informs us about today's Egypt.

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