Intersection

Intersection

From WMFE

Where Central Florida's politics, science, business, economics and social issues meet. Listen to host Matthew Peddie and guests examine current issues.More from Intersection »

Most Recent Episodes

Central Florida Lawmakers Weigh In On Obama's Trans-Pacific Partnership

President Obama's Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal would reduce tariffs on goods traded across the Pacific Ocean. It's the president's biggest legislative push since the Affordable Care Act, and it's making strange political bedfellows: republicans back the president's trade deal while democrats are against it. Supporters say it opens our doors to 40 percent of the world's trade market, opponents say it will kill blue collar jobs back home and allow international companies to sue down to the local level if they don't like restrictions on things like labor and the environment. To talk more about the Trans-Pacific Partnership, 90.7's Catherine Welch speaks with Democratic Congressman Alan Grayson and Republican Congressman John Mica about the plan.

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Florida Legislature In Limbo

The Florida House packed up early, saying they couldn't work through a stalemate with the Senate over health care funding. A special session is likely as the two chambers were unable to pass a budget during the regular 60-day session. But the collapse of the regular session took down some big bills like water preservation and left other legislation like Medicaid expansion in limbo. To talk more about what made it and what didn't, 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks with reporters Amy Green and Abe Aboraya. And later in the program, University of Central Florida political scientist Aubrey Jewett joins Matthew Peddie to discuss the special session process - and how the two chambers will negotiate Florida's budget.

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Little Vietnam

When the Vietnam War ended in 1975, around 130,000 Vietnamese left the country. Instability in Vietnam after the war prompted another mass exodus in 1978 by the so-called 'boat-people'. Seeing a humanitarian crisis, the U.S. Government lessened the restrictions of Vietnamese immigrants in 1980 and two years later the number of Vietnamese immigrants in the U.S. was over 250,000. Forty years later, those first immigrants have established families and businesses in the United States and defined a community here in Central Florida. Vu Nguyen and Hoang Doan are both Presidents of the Vietnamese Student Association at the University of Central Florida - but three decades apart. They join 90.7's Matthew Peddie to discuss the generational differences between the first generation of Vietnamese Americans and the next. Also, the Mills 50 district of Orlando is known for its vietnamese cuisine. Ricky Ly, food blogger from Tasty Chomps, takes the Intersection team for a tour of the Mills and Colonial neighborhood to sample some of the signature cuisine.

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Modern-Day Adventurers

Famed tightrope walker Nik Wallenda is planning to walk along the Orlando Eye while it spins. His 400-foot high stroll will set a Guinness world record as spectators look on from below. PNC Vice President Greg Simmons took time out from the boardroom to climb 19,000 feet to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro. University of Central Florida Creative Writing Professor Pat Rushin's book 'The Call' was made into the feature film 'The Zero Theorem' - The main character in the book searches for meaning in a meaningless world. What drives people to seek out the extraordinary? 90.7's Matthew Peddie talks with modern-day adventurers- both literal and literary.

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Marco Rubio: "I Announce My Candidacy For President Of The United States"

Florida Senator Marco Rubio joins fellow Republican Presidential hopefuls Ted Cruz and Rand Paul. But what are Rubio's chances in a crowded primary field? Does he have what it takes to beat another potential presidential candidate from Florida - his one-time mentor Jeb Bush? Can he overcome Hillary Clinton or whoever the Democrats nominate? And what's next for Florida's Senate seat? 90.7's Matthew Peddie puts those questions to Miami Herald Political Editor Sergio Bustos, New Hampshire Public Radio Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, and Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

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Florida's Fight For Medicaid and Medical Marijuana

The Florida House and Senate have each passed a budget but there's a big gap between the two budgets. A $4 billion gap. The reason why lawmakers in the House and Senate are so far apart is a disagreement over healthcare, specifically whether or not to expand Medicaid now that a billion dollar fund for indigent care is going away. To talk more about the budget and the prospects of Medicaid expansion 90.7's Health Reporter Abe Aboraya and University of Central Florida Political Scientist Professor Aubrey Jewett join the program. Also, A Quinnipiac University poll released Monday shows 84 percent of Floridians support medical marijuana. But will it be enough to get a revised constitutional amendment passed? Orlando attorney and outspoken advocate for medical marijuana John Morgan joins the program to talk more about the initiative, and what he learned after a failed attempt in 2014.

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Two Floridas? The Case For A Split State

South Miami officials want to break Florida into two states. They claim Tallahassee isn't addressing the challenge of climate change. Central Florida is caught in the cross hairs - half of the region would fall into the state of "North Florida", and the other half in "South Florida". To discuss South Florida's unique environmental challenges 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks to South Miami Mayor Walter Harris and Stetson University Environmental Sciences Professor Jason Evans. Later in the program, they talk about the cultural differences and the political challenges of splitting the state with Rollins College Professor of Urban History Julian Chambliss and Stetson University Political Science Professor T. Wayne Bailie

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Constitution Green

Thornton Park in Orlando boasts one of the oldest oak trees in the City. The Live Oak on Constitution Green is- by some estimates- 175 years old and it's on the city's list of significant trees. The city leases the land the tree grows on from a family that may now want to develop it- and that's galvanized a growing number of supporters who fear the tree could be cut down. To talk about the arguments for and against preserving this tree and other historic trees and green spaces in the city, 90.7's Matthew Peddie talks to Eric Rollings from the Soil and Water Conservation Board, who's spearheading an effort to save the tree, and Gregg Logan, the managing director of the real estate consulting firm RCLCO. 90.7's News Director Catherine Welch has been following the story and attended a rally over the weekend. She begins the show by explaining how the debate about the tree got started.

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Intersection: Pilot Shortage & Sanford Airport CEO Larry Dale

For nearly 14 years, Larry Dale has run the Orlando-Sanford International Airport. During that time he doubled the airports passenger count to over 2 million while overseeing a slew of developmental projects and the transition to private security screeners. This month Dale announced his retirement. Dale speaks to 90.7's Matthew Peddie about his time as CEO of Orlando Sanford International - and shares some words of advice for his replacement. But first, the Federal Aviation Administration says pilots must retire once they reach 65. A dwindling veteran pilot pool, and low starting pay for 'right seat'- or co-pilots- in some regional carriers, has some airline industry experts worried about a pilot shortage. They say many Airline Transport Pilot- or ATP license holders- won't consider regional airlines until pay improves Dr. Tim Brady, Dean of Embry-Riddle's College of Aviation; Keith Hagy, Director of Engineering and Air Safety with the Airline Pilots Association, International; and Analyst Bill Swelbar join a discussion about the potential impacts of a pilot shortage here in the U-S-.

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Impact Of Pilot Shortage & Sanford-Orlando CEO Larry Dale Retires

The Federal Aviation Administration says pilots must retire once they reach 65. A dwindling veteran pilot pool and low starting pay for 'right seat' - or co-pilots - in some regional carriers has some airline industry experts worried about a pilot shortage. They say many Airline Transport Pilot license holders won't consider regional airlines until pay improves Dean of Embry-Riddle's College of Aviation Dr. Tim Duncan, Kieth Hay, Director of Engineering and Air Safety with the Airline Pilots Association International; and Analyst Bill Swelbar join 90.7's Matthew Peddie to discuss the potential impacts of a pilot shortage here in the U.S. Also, for nearly 14 years, Larry Dale has run the Orlando-Sanford International Airport. During that time he doubled the airports passenger count to over 2-million while overseeing a slew of developmental projects and the transition to private security screeners. This month Dale announced his retirement. Dale spoke to 90.7's Matthew Peddie about his time as CEO of Orlando Sanford International and shares some words of advice for his replacement.

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