Intersection

Intersection

From WMFE

Where Central Florida's politics, science, business, economics and social issues meet. Listen to host Matthew Peddie and guests examine current issues.More from Intersection »

Most Recent Episodes

Intersection: Friday News Round Table

Then non profit hospitals in Central Florida enjoy tax breaks because of their non-profit status. They do good work and help the community... but should they be paying more taxes? Orlando Sentinel columnist Beth Kassab has been exploring this idea in a series of columns she'll join us to discuss the series and talk over the issues. The ongoing saga of the homeless in Daytona Beach takes another turn. Daytona Beach Police Chief Mike Chitwood is investigating a self styled homeless advocate for fraud. This comes after the homeless encampment outside a county building was dismantled after a month and a half. Does breaking down that encampment solve the problem? A pair of gun bills are sailing through the Florida House of Representatives but could hit the wall in the Senate. Is this the year for gun rights to expand in Florida? Are you looking forward to being able to open carry in the sunshine state? Or does open carry make you nervous? And Zika cases are popping up around the sunshine state. Cases of the mosquito borne virus have been found in South Florida how long before the disease appears in Central Florida?

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51:03
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Intersection: Iowa Caucus & Florida Ballot Initatives

Iowa has spoken. Voters in Iowa, the first state to weigh in, caucused last night and now the candidates are setting their sights on New Hampshire. Political analysts Dick Batchelor and Michelle Ertel talk about Florida's Republican presidential candidates former Governor Jeb Bush and Senator Marco Rubio. With Iowa in the rear view mirror, what's next for Jeb and his one time protege? And, the deadline to collect enough signatures to get a constitutional amendment on the Florida ballot for 2016 just passed. We'll dig into two big issues facing Floridians in November: medical marijuana and solar power. Ben Pollara from United For Care talks about next for supporters of medical marijuana. And Calvina Fay from the Foundation for a Drug Free America explains why she doesn't think voters will pass the amendment. Then, reporter Mitch Perry breaks down the competing solar initiatives.

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Intersection: Friday News Round Table

The long, gruelling, presidential election is moving into the next phase. The Iowa caucus is just days away and most polls have Donald Trump winning by a healthy margin, with Ted Cruz in hot pursuit and Jeb Bush at the back of the field. Donald Trump, by the way, wasn't even in the latest debate, but there's still a long way to go in the campaign. What does Iowa mean for Jeb, or Marco Rubio for that matter. We'll talk about the latest debate and the Iowa caucus. Then Medical marijuana supporters net enough signatures to get an amendment on the ballot for November. But will they get enough votes in November? Is this a boost for folks who are just looking for something to help them cope with debilitating illness or is it a bad move as opponents say? We'll also talk about the ongoing Daytona Beach homeless saga- an emergency shelter opens... but some beds stay unfilled as the homeless stick to their encampment outside the Volusia County administration building. And Orange County residents have brand new bins but many of them aren't happy. The County's been flooded with complaint calls.

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Intersection: Solar Energy In Central Florida

When you talk about renewable energy in Florida, chances are the first thing that comes up is solar power. After all this is the sunshine state. And while solar isn't the only renewable energy on tap, solar panels are popping up on rooftops across Central Florida. Today on Intersection, we'll talk to a homeowner who helped found a co-operative to bring down the cost of solar panel installation in Orlando. Michael Cohen says since the co-op was founded, they've been inundated with calls from homeowners and businesses from across the state asking how they can do the same. Then, Jim Fenton, who heads the Florida Solar Energy Center, explains how the sunshine state could harness the power of the sun to become energy independent, and he says the reason he started driving an electric car wasn't to save the planet, but for the acceleration. And, while solar power can pay for itself in the long run, putting it on your roof isn't cheap. Ken LaRoe from First Green Bank talks about what his bank is doing to encourage sustainability.

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Intersection: Friday News Round Table

The Daytona International Speedway has locked in the last seat in its renovation ushering in a new era for the iconic motor racing venue. What does that mean for the speedway and Daytona Beach? Meanwhile, a homeless encampment in Daytona with about 100 residents gets a couple of toilets. The Salvation Army is working on an emergency shelter for those at the camp but the city and the county are each trying to find a permanent solution a place where these homeless folks can find shelter and services. Meanwhile as cold weather blankets Central Florida, the city of Orlando starts a homeless count and in Seminole County there's a group that wants panhandlers to pay for the privilege of standing on street corners and begging for money. And as the Florida legislative session rolls on- we'll talk about one bill that's making waves one that's flying under the radar..and another that's getting holstered!!!!!!! Critics of a water bill signed by Governor Rick Scott include a former governor. And media organizations are sounding the alarm about a bill that could change public access to records. the friday news roundtable on 90,7.

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Intersection: Civil Rights, Past & Present

It's been more than 50 years since the march on Washington, the high point of the civil rights movement in the 1960's as Black Americans fought to desegregate. Civil Rights battles are still being fought but with new voices and in new spaces. As the nation reflects on the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King in 2016, we sit down to talk with two Central Floridians who were on the front lines of the fight for equality in the 60's. Orange County's first elected mayor, Linda Chapin, talks about what it was like for a white young woman who grew up in the South to be swept along in the Civil Rights movement. And Reverend Nelson Pinder talks about how the fight for racial equality and his religious mission were entwined from the day he set foot in Orlando. Then, Sam Sinyangwe, who grew up in Orlando, explains how for his generation, social media tools like Twitter have become invaluable in the struggle for Civil Rights. And he talks about how he uses data and mapping to help minority communities fight injustice.

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Intersection: Friday News Round Table

Governor Rick Scott delivered his annual state of the state address, calling on the legislature for 250-million-dollars for job creation and a billion dollar tax cut. Meanwhile the power-ball reached a record jackpot- but what's the downside to lottery fever? From big money to big animals- the circus rolls into Orlando this weekend- and it could be the last time you'll see elephants performing. Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey says it'll end the elephant show in a few months about two years ahead of schedule. Is it the right move at the right time for the circus? Is it all part of a seismic shift in attitudes to the role of animals in entertainment we're seeing elsewhere in Central Florida? In Brevard County, a commissioner wants a second look at the slow speed zones for boats saying they may not be doing anything to save the beloved manatees. Manatee insanity or a reasonable approach? The supreme court rules Florida's death penalty is unconstitutional, so what does that mean for the state's 390 death row inmates? Then have you been Hispandered to lately? If you speak Spanish and vote you probably have. What is Hispandering and why are political commentators warning you to watch out for it this campaign season?

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Intersection: A Tale Of Two Cities

2016 is a big year for national and state politics as the presidential election looms. But there's a lot going on in city politics and cities are also reacting to profound changes - whether it's changing demographics, new building or transportation going in. We'll check in with two Central Florida cities that are riding a wave of change: Titusville, where mayor Jim Tulley talks us through the effects of the transformation underway with the space industry and Kissimmee, where Mayor Jim Swan explains the challenge and opportunity of a population boom. It's a tale of two cities on Intersection. And later in the program, WFSU news director Lynn Hatter joins Intersection with a preview of Governor Rick Scott's State of the State address to the legislature.

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Intersection: Friday News Round Table

Florida's Former Governor Jeb Bush is pulling staff out of Miami and sending them up to New Hampshire. It's a must win state for Jeb but is it a good move or does it smack of desperation from a campaign where the polls don't match the money spent? Then Islamophobia rears its ugly head in Titusville a mosque is vandalized. The alleged perpetrator is arrested but local leaders say the act of vandalism is not representative of the community and the suspect- is an outlier. And Governor Rick Scott says while he won't be endorsing anyone before the GOP primary he does pipe up to say frontrunner Donald Trump captures the frustrations of the people. It's the friday news roundtable on 90.7

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Intersection: Legislative Look Ahead And The Expansion Of Gambling

Pretty soon lawmakers will flock back to Tallahassee to tackle open carry legislation, gambling, tax cuts and of course the state budget. After a fractious 2015 marked by legal wrangling over redistricting and lawmakers butting heads over medicaid expansion, what's in store for this session? Jason Garcia from Florida Trend magazine discusses some of the challenges for Governor Rick Scott and lawmakers as they look to pass a budget and what lawmakers will be focused on for the 90 day session. Then, we'll take a closer look at one of the big issues for 2016: gambling in the sunshine state. University of Central Florida political science professor Aubrey Jewett talks about the state's compact with the Seminole tribe, and South Florida Senator Maria Sachs discusses her plan to establish a gaming commission.

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