Intersection

Intersection

From WMFE

Where Central Florida's politics, science, business, economics and social issues meet. Listen to host Matthew Peddie and guests examine current issues.More from Intersection »

Most Recent Episodes

Intersection: Comforting Police, UCF's Bug Closet, and Sister Honey's Bakery

New body camera footage shows the chaos and devastation first responders faced when responding to the Pulse nightclub shooting. As law enforcement ran head-first into a dangerous situation, they found themselves in a warzone. After witnessing such an event, how do police cope with the stress, horror and chaos? A conversationwith the Orlando Police Captain Tim Crews overseeing the mental well-being of the Orlando police force. Plus a visit to the "Bug Closet," a collection of more than a half-a-million creepy crawlers at UCF. And how one local baker turned her mother's recipes into a thriving business - one slice of cocoanut cake at a time.

Intersection: Comforting Police, UCF's Bug Closet, and Sister Honey's Bakery

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Intersection: RNC Speakers, Clinton's Florida Visit, & Rubio Confronts Protestor

Florida politicos took the stage at the Republican National Convention this week: Governor Rick Scott made the call to destroy ISIS, while Attorney General Pam Bondi set her sights on slamming Hillary Clinton. Does the duo help Donald Trump take Florida in November? On the other side of Presidential politics, Hillary Clinton swings through the Sunshine State this weekend, and rumor has it, she will name her vice presidential pick. What's the significance of Florida as a backdrop for a major campaign announcement? Plus, Senator Marco Rubio faces criticism from a protester at a recent stop in Orlando.

Intersection: RNC Speakers, Clinton's Florida Visit, & Rubio Confronts Protestor

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Intersection: Alzheimer's Help, Congressional Primaries & "Oh, Florida!"

40 percent of caregivers taking care of someone with Alzheimer's or dementia will die before their loved one if they don't take care of themselves. A staggering statistic, but there's help. Plus, it's time to start paying attention to the Congressional Primary races. Our political analysts take a look at the 9th, 10th, and 11th districts — who's running and what voters can expect in the weeks leading up to the primary. And, the zany "Florida Man" is spotted in headlines across the nation — but what makes the sunshine state ripe for strange news stories? "Oh Florida" author Craig Pittman joins me for his take on why we're the strangest state in the nation.

Intersection: Alzheimer's Help, Congressional Primaries & "Oh, Florida!"

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Intersection: Community Policing, Algae Troubles and Corrine Brown's Indictment

Tension between police and the communities they protect has reached a tipping point after two police-involved shootings in Minnesota and Louisiana and the killing of five Dallas police officers following a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest there. Now, the Black Lives Matter movement is resurging here in central Florida: how do we stack-up when it comes to police-community relations? And what can the nation learn from the region's handling of incidents such as the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford? Plus, stinky, toxic algae is taking over waterways in south Florida, threatening Florida's Treasure Coast. As politicians pass the blame around, can this be a catalyst for change in the way the state's water resources are managed? And, one month after the Pulse massacre, the family of one victim is taking its case for stricter gun control to Washington D.C. Local activists stage a sit-in at Senator Marco Rubio's office calling for change. Some of the demonstrators were arrested. Will the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history lead to tighter gun laws in Florida or for the nation?

Intersection: Community Policing, Algae Troubles and Corrine Brown's Indictment

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Intersection: Algae, Pulse: One Month, And A Conversation With Diane Rehm

Algae in the coastal areas of Lake Okeechobee is growing so big, you can see it from space. As politicians pass the blame, activists want change in how the state's water is managed. TC Palm's Outdoor Columnist Ed Killer joins me with the latest. Plus, today marks one-month since the deadly Pulse nightclub shooting. The investigation into those three chaotic and grim hours continues, as hospital bills for victims rack up. 90.7's Abe Aboraya and Brendan Byrne join the program with what we know one month on, and what's ahead for victims, families and the community. And, Diane Rehm is nearing the end of her 30-plus year career in broadcasting. She joined 90.7's Matthew Peddie last month, listen back to their conversation about how she started in broadcasting and how much she'll miss the microphone.

Intersection: Algae, Pulse: One Month, And A Conversation With Diane Rehm

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Intersection: Algae, Gun Control And Sports In Brevard County

Blue Green Algae causes a stink in South Florida. Fingers are pointed, blame assigned. But how to stop this happening again? Central Floridians meanwhile are still nervous after the fish kill in spring in the Northern Indian River lagoon. Are Florida's famed beaches doomed? Democratic lawmakers in Florida fail to get the votes they need to call a special session to discuss gun control. Meanwhile their counterparts on Capitol Hill are also beating the drum for gun control. As the weeks tick on after the shooting at Pulse nightclub - was that massacre a turning point? Or just another mass killing to add to the list? Some lawmakers say the focus should be on mental health... not gun control. Is mental health the issue that needs attention? Enterprise Florida, the agency whose job is to bring new jobs and business to the sunshine state is slimming down. In Brevard County, the minor league Manatees team leaves for Osceola County and there's debate over a new stadium in Titusville. Is Central Florida becoming a sports destination? Are new stadiums worth the investment for smaller cities?

Intersection: Algae, Gun Control And Sports In Brevard County

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Intersection: The Impact Of The Pulse Shooting On Local Businesses

Sixty businesses were closed for more than a week after the mass shooting at Pulse, as the FBI set a wide perimeter around the crime scene. The streets are open again, but some business owners have had to get loans to cover lost revenue. Store owner Jonathan Toothman talks about the impact of that lost week, and what it means to work across the street from the site of the worst mass shooting in modern US history. And Sarah Elbadri at the Downtown South business association explains how her organization is helping those affected long term. Marco Rubio decided last month that he wants to hold onto his Senate seat afterall. Political analysts Dick Batchelor and Frank Torres talk about how Rubio's run changes the equation for the other senate candidates, both the high profile contenders and some of those who aren't so well known. And they discuss some of the high profile Congressional races and how the fallout from the Pulse shooting is filtering into state and national politics. The Timucua White House is an unconventional concert and art venue in Orlando. Benoit Glazer began hosting concerts at his house in 2000, but he only got the permit he needed from the city this year. Glazer joins us to talk about the future of his White House.

Intersection: The Impact Of The Pulse Shooting On Local Businesses

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Intersection: Abortion Laws, Pulse Documents & Call For Special Session

The US supreme court dealt a blow to restrictive abortion laws in Texas. The Texas had cut the number of abortion clinics from 40 to 10. Pro choice groups are cheering the decision Meanwhile a similar in Florida is also before the courts. What impact will the US supreme court's ruling have on Florida? It's nearly three weeks since the shooting at Pulse nightclub. New details about the mass shooting are emerging slowly. Media organizations have sued the city to get 911 recordings from that night. The city says its hands are tied by the FBI investigation. And now the Department of Justice is involved and the case has moved to federal court. How much information should the public have access to about the shooting? What questions are lingering about what happened in the hours before the gunman was killed? A group of lawmakers and other organizations are calling for a special session to discuss gun legislation. They don't want to take guns away from law abiding citizens... but they do want stricter background checks, and a way to stop people on the FBI's no fly and other watch lists from buying guns in Florida. Senate President Andy Gardiner says the state can't step in and lead where the federal government is not. Governor Rick Scott says the real issue is not gun control but ISIS. So what's to be done?

Intersection: Abortion Laws, Pulse Documents & Call For Special Session

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Intersection: Pulse 911 lawsuit, fundraising and Pecha Kucha

In the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub shooting there are questions. What was happening in the nightclub in the 3 hours after police first went into Pulse and exchanged gunfire with the shooter? Media organizations are trying to get recordings of hundreds of calls made from the club during the crisis including 911 calls. Those calls could shed light on the timeline. But the city of Orlando says it can't release the recordings, and now a court is being asked to decide. Barbara Peterson from the first amendment foundation talks about the lawsuit and what it means for transparency. How do people respond to a tragedy? One way is by donating money, and in the aftermath of the Pulse shooting the cash is flying in. Equality Florida set up one of those funds. We'll talk to Ida Eskamani from Equality Florida about how they're managing the millions of dollars raised through a go fund me account. And if you love the idea of those inspirational, high concept TED talks but just don't have time, Pecha Kucha might be your thing. 90.7's Catherine Welch talks to Eddie Selover about the slide show that's been described as "TED on Crack", which returns to Orlando next week, with presentations on skateboarding, homelessness, interracial dating and more.

Intersection: Pulse 911 lawsuit, fundraising and Pecha Kucha

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Intersection: Friday News Round Table

The weeks of mourning and mobilizing in Orlando are giving way to long-term discussions regarding gun legislation and the effectiveness of the FBI and Orlando Police Department. Then, the alliance between members of various minority communities - more specifically Latinos and the LGBT. Is this something new? Will the tragedy, in a way, help bridge the gap of LGBT acceptance in the Latino community? And, Marco Rubio announced on his website on Wednesday that he will be seeking re-election after all. Will his sudden change of heart score against him and does it even matter?

Intersection: Friday News Round Table

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