Intersection

Intersection

From WMFE

Where Central Florida's politics, science, business, economics and social issues meet. Listen to host Matthew Peddie and guests examine current issues.More from Intersection »

Most Recent Episodes

The Cost And Consequences Of Downtown Development

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer says his city is world class. But what does that mean? A proposed high rise near Lake Eola is raising hackles - so can residents agree on the best way to build up the city? Commercial Developer Paul Ellis joins the program to talk about balancing growth and the needs of the residents. And Mayor Dyer joins Intersection to talk about his vision for a World Class City - and how he plans to draw more business and residents to the heart of Orlando. As Orlando grows up there's more attention on the city's homeless. Andrae Bailey from the Central Florida Commission on Homelessness joins 90.7's Matthew Peddie to talk about the effort to end chronic homelessness in the downtown core and across greater Orlando. The cost and consequences of downtown development.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

49:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/427046799/427046801" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Cuba: The Island, The Expats And The Music

For the first time in more than 50 years, the United States will reopen its embassy in Havana and Cuba will reopen its embassy in Washington, D.C. The diplomatic thaw is opening up new opportunities for trade and travel, while here in Central Florida, direct flights from Orlando to Cuba are starting up. But what does the easing of restrictions mean for expat Cubans? And what impact will new business and tourism have on Cuba? To talk more about the changes to come for Cuba, 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks with Stetson University's International Business chair Bill Andrews. And 90.7's Crystal Chavez reports on how expats in Central Florida are feeling about the diplomatic thaw. Later in the program, we'll hear from a Cuban musician keeping the spirit of Cuban music alive here in Florida.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/420899777/420899779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

The Controversy Over H-1B Visas

Thousands of H1B visas are issued each year. They allow US companies to hire foreign workers for specialized positions that they can't fill with American workers. Some companies say the quota for these visas is too low, and the tech industry especially needs more freedom to hire talent from overseas. But others say there are loopholes in the system that are being exploited. Recently the New York Times reported on layoffs at Disney, where IT workers were told to train their replacements- Indian IT workers on H1B visas. To talk about the visa program 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks with Julia Preston from the New York Times about her reporting. Also, the CEO of a Central Florida tech start-up joins the program along with Congressman John Mica to talk about the politics of the visa debate.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/418884854/418884873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Jeb Bush Enters Crowded Race For Republican Nomination

Its official – Jeb Bush is running for President. The announcement ends almost a year of Jeb exploring the possibilities of running while fundraising through his political action committee, Right to Rise. But Bush joins a crowded Republican field – including Florida neighbor and protégé Marco Rubio. Miami Herald's Political Editor Sergio Bustos joins the program to go over the announcement – who was there, who wasn't there, what was said, and what's next for candidate Jeb Bush. We'll also sort through the pro's and con's of a third Bush running for office and what that means for Florida's primary with Republican Strategist Adam Goodman and Democratic Analyst Jeremiah Jaspon. And later in the program – Intersection's Brendan Byrne takes a look at Governor Bush's record with University of South Florida Political Scientist Susan MacManus and how Bush stacks up against Marco Rubio as Floridians will have to decide between two of their own.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/414920167/414920169" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Diving Into Daytona Beach Economy

Daytona Beach is branded 'The Original American Beach', and the city's long been synonymous with motor sports like NASCAR, the Daytona International Speedway , bike week and beach driving. But as Florida's economy picks up after a long recession, some say Daytona needs to do more to keep up with that wave, drawing more visitors with higher-end hotels and more family oriented attractions. Intersection dives into Daytona with a look at the economics, quality of life and business opportunities in the original Beach town.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:00
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/411470755/411470785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Central Florida's Tourism Rise And The Impact On Hospitality Jobs

In the first three months of 2015, more than 28 million visitors came to Florida, many of them drawn to the Orlando area theme parks and attractions. Orlando International Airport is also recording higher passenger numbers, and the airport is pushing ahead with plans for a new terminal. President and CEO of the US Travel Association Roger Dow joins the program to talk about the recent uptick in tourism. But what does a tourism boom mean for the boots-on-the-ground workers in the hospitality industry? To find out, 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks to University of Central Florida Sociologist Jim Wright about jobs in the hospitality industry. And later, Eric Clinton, President of Unite Here , a labor union for Disney Workers, talks about the push for higher wages.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/409805082/409805112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Central Florida Lawmakers Weigh In On Obama's Trans-Pacific Partnership

President Obama's Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal would reduce tariffs on goods traded across the Pacific Ocean. It's the president's biggest legislative push since the Affordable Care Act, and it's making strange political bedfellows: republicans back the president's trade deal while democrats are against it. Supporters say it opens our doors to 40 percent of the world's trade market, opponents say it will kill blue collar jobs back home and allow international companies to sue down to the local level if they don't like restrictions on things like labor and the environment. To talk more about the Trans-Pacific Partnership, 90.7's Catherine Welch speaks with Democratic Congressman Alan Grayson and Republican Congressman John Mica about the plan.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:00
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/406222420/406222473" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Florida Legislature In Limbo

The Florida House packed up early, saying they couldn't work through a stalemate with the Senate over health care funding. A special session is likely as the two chambers were unable to pass a budget during the regular 60-day session. But the collapse of the regular session took down some big bills like water preservation and left other legislation like Medicaid expansion in limbo. To talk more about what made it and what didn't, 90.7's Matthew Peddie speaks with reporters Amy Green and Abe Aboraya. And later in the program, University of Central Florida political scientist Aubrey Jewett joins Matthew Peddie to discuss the special session process - and how the two chambers will negotiate Florida's budget.

Listen to the Episode

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/404440523/404440548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Listen to the Episode

Little Vietnam

When the Vietnam War ended in 1975, around 130,000 Vietnamese left the country. Instability in Vietnam after the war prompted another mass exodus in 1978 by the so-called 'boat-people'. Seeing a humanitarian crisis, the U.S. Government lessened the restrictions of Vietnamese immigrants in 1980 and two years later the number of Vietnamese immigrants in the U.S. was over 250,000. Forty years later, those first immigrants have established families and businesses in the United States and defined a community here in Central Florida. Vu Nguyen and Hoang Doan are both Presidents of the Vietnamese Student Association at the University of Central Florida - but three decades apart. They join 90.7's Matthew Peddie to discuss the generational differences between the first generation of Vietnamese Americans and the next. Also, the Mills 50 district of Orlando is known for its vietnamese cuisine. Ricky Ly, food blogger from Tasty Chomps, takes the Intersection team for a tour of the Mills and Colonial neighborhood to sample some of the signature cuisine.

Listen

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/402829113/402829115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Modern-Day Adventurers

Famed tightrope walker Nik Wallenda is planning to walk along the Orlando Eye while it spins. His 400-foot high stroll will set a Guinness world record as spectators look on from below. PNC Vice President Greg Simmons took time out from the boardroom to climb 19,000 feet to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro. University of Central Florida Creative Writing Professor Pat Rushin's book 'The Call' was made into the feature film 'The Zero Theorem' - The main character in the book searches for meaning in a meaningless world. What drives people to seek out the extraordinary? 90.7's Matthew Peddie talks with modern-day adventurers- both literal and literary.

Listen

Loading…

28:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/401238976/401238980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
Back To Top