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Refugees and migrants sleep on the deck of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue vessel Golfo Azzurro after being rescued off Libyan coast north of Sabratha, Libya. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

#654: When The Boats Arrive

In the span of a few months in 1980, more than 100,000 Cuban immigrants arrived in Miami. So what happened to Florida's economy with all these new people coming in? And what can we learn from it?

#654: When The Boats Arrive

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#755: The Phone At The End Of The World

A charismatic populist president wanted to boost manufacturing and create jobs. She told companies, 'if you want to sell your stuff here, you have to build it here.' This is what happened.

#755: The Phone At The End Of The World

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iStockphoto

#754: I'm So Happy For You!

Here at Planet Money, our favorite stories are the ones we wish we'd done ourselves. On the show, we call out rivals and colleagues who did what we try to do better than we could have done it.

#754: I'm So Happy For You!

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#753: Blockchain Gang

Charlie Shrem went to prison. While he was there, he thought up a better way to move money behind bars. Now he's out and trying to sell his idea to international investors.

#753: Blockchain Gang

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A Saudia airlines crew arrives at the international arrivals hall at Washington Dulles International Airport on February 6, 2017 in Dulles, Virginia. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

#436: If Economists Controlled The Borders

What would the perfect immigration system look like? We ask three economists and get three very different answers. (None of which include building a wall.)

#436: If Economists Controlled The Borders

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White Oak Pastures/White Oak Pastures

#752: Eagles vs. Chickens

Picture an organic farm, with thousands of free-range chickens roaming wide-open land. Now picture it from above, from the vantage of a soaring bald eagle. It's an all-you-can-eat buffet.

#752: Eagles vs. Chickens

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

#751: The Thing About That Border Tax

Over the next few months, we're going to explain President Trump's economic plans. Today: a totally new idea for corporate taxes. What's the plan, what's the theory behind it, and does it work?

#751: The Thing About That Border Tax

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Workers assemble a General Electric Co. GE Transportation locomotive at the Erie, Pennsylvania, plant in 2009. Doug Benz /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Benz /Bloomberg via Getty Images

#750: Retraining Day

When an American loses his/her job to trade, there is program to help. It's been around for decades. It makes a lot of sense. It is a generous program. And almost nobody's heard of it. But why?

#750: Retraining Day

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Khin Maung Win/AFP/Getty Images

#632: The Chicken Tax

President Trump talks about putting tariffs on foreign cars. But there are already tariffs on auto imports and one got there because of chickens in Germany. This is how trade barriers tend to spread.

#632: The Chicken Tax

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Brent Lewin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

#749: Professor Blackjack

Ed Thorp started his career teaching math at MIT. Then he slid sideways into blackjack, changed the game forever, and set his sights on Wall Street investing. He changed that forever too.

#749: Professor Blackjack

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