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Alt.Latino

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A voyage across the world in search of the best new Rock en Espanol and Latin Alternative music releases. Co-hosts Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd also pay tribute to the pioneers of the genre.More from Alt.Latino »

Most Recent Episodes

Karol Conka performs live on stage at Autodromo de Interlagos on in Brazil. She's a featured artist on this week's show. Mauricio Santana/Getty Images hide caption

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Mauricio Santana/Getty Images

Get To Know Afro-Brazilian Music With This Alt.Latino Mixtape

Continue celebrating Black History Month with a dive into the vibrant world of Afro-Brazilian music, including hip-hop, funk, soul and jazz.

Get To Know Afro-Brazilian Music With This Alt.Latino Mixtape

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This week we feature Quetzal's The Eternal Getdown and other Afro-Latino music from Smithsonian Folkways. Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways hide caption

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Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

For Black History Month, Celebrate Afro-Latino Music With Smithsonian Folkways

With Folkways curator Dan Sheehy as a guide, Alt.Latino explores how the music of West Africa has influenced Latin America and the Caribbean.

For Black History Month, Celebrate Afro-Latino Music With Smithsonian Folkways

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Brazilian rapper Rapadura Xique Chico is featured in this week's show. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

'La Verdad': The Truth Of Latin American Hip-Hop

Hip-hop scholar Jason Nichols says hip-hop in Latin America is more than just music — it's cultural exchange. Hear a conversation and a few tracks from all over the region.

'La Verdad': The Truth Of Latin American Hip-Hop

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Hosted by Peruvian-American novelist Daniel Alarcón, Radio Ambulante is a Spanish-language podcast that uses long-form audio journalism to tell important but neglected and under-reported Latin American and Latino stories. Hugo Rojo/NPR hide caption

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Hugo Rojo/NPR

Alt.Latino Visits NPR's Newest Podcast: Radio Ambulante

Radio Ambulante is a Spanish-language podcast that features a wide array of voices and stories.

Alt.Latino Visits NPR's Newest Podcast: Radio Ambulante

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President Barack Obama speaks during a taping of "In Performance at the White House: Fiesta Latina," a concert celebrating Hispanic musical heritage, at the White House in October 2009. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A Despedida Playlist To Bid POTUS Farewell

As President Obama leaves office, Alt.Latino digs up some of the Latin music that's found its way into the Mixtape-Maker-In-Chief's playlists.

A Despedida Playlist To Bid POTUS Farewell

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Cafe Tacvba's "Futuro" is featured on this week's episode of Alt.Latino. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Alt.Latino Spring 2017 New Music Preview

Hear new tracks from Cafe Tacvba, Dayme Arocena, Chicano Batman, Hurray For The Riff Raff and more.

The Alt.Latino Spring 2017 New Music Preview

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iLe performs as part of NPR Music: Live In Concert at Damrosch Park in New York on Aug. 4, 2016. Ebru Yildiz/NPR hide caption

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Ebru Yildiz/NPR

Alt.Latino Listeners Pick The Best Of 2016

You've heard from us about the best Latin music of the year — now, we're hearing from you.

Alt.Latino Listeners Pick The Best Of 2016

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Y La Bamba's Luz Elena Mendoza released Ojos Del Sol this year. It's one of Alt.Latino's favorites of 2016. Gerardo Mendoza/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gerardo Mendoza/Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino Picks The Best Latin Music Of 2016

This was a year for redefining expectations and defying conventions in Latin music. Hear 10 songs that represent just some of the highlights.

Alt.Latino Picks The Best Latin Music Of 2016

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Santana's original lineup reunited for Santana IV, which came out in April 2016. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Encore: Carlos Santana Breaks Down His Band's Trailblazing Sound

The original Santana made music history nearly 50 years ago. When the band reunited for a short tour this spring, the guitarist told Alt.Latino how he and his collaborators did it.

Encore: Carlos Santana Breaks Down His Band's Trailblazing Sound

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Pianist Chucho Valdes, founding member of the Cuban band Irakere, poses before a concert in Madrid in 2005. Pierre-Philippe Marcou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre-Philippe Marcou/AFP/Getty Images

The Sounds Of Cuba, In Exile And At Home

In the wake of Fidel Castro's death, Alt.Latino looks at the artists who remained in Cuba after the revolution and those who've left — and how their music reflects both realities.

The Sounds Of Cuba, In Exile And At Home

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