As the burgeoning marijuana industry booms, who is reaping the benefits, and who is being left behind? Chelsea Beck hide caption

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Chelsea Beck

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

The history of cannabis in the U.S. ― and its criminalization ― is deeply interwoven with race. As the legal cannabis market gains traction, people of color who were targeted by the drug war could be left out of the green rush.

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

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Amy Gonzalez lives in the hottest part of Los Angeles, where average temperatures are rising. Molly Peterson for NPR hide caption

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Molly Peterson for NPR

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

On this week's episode we talk about why certain communities are more vulnerable to catastrophic weather events like hurricanes and heat waves. Saying "mother nature doesn't discriminate," ignores the fact that discrimination exacerbates her wrath.

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

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Tom Burrell, ad man. Courtesy of Tom Burrell hide caption

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Courtesy of Tom Burrell

An Advertising Revolution: "Black People Are Not Dark-Skinned White People"

How do you get black people to buy cigarettes made for cowboys and antebellum-style beer? Turns out, you don't. On this episode: Tom Burrell, who transformed the ad industry with a simple motto, "Black people are not dark-skinned white people."

An Advertising Revolution: "Black People Are Not Dark-Skinned White People"

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A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

On this week's episode, a viral video gives us the opportunity to talk about racism towards and within the Latino community. When a Latino flipped over a street vendor's cart in Los Angeles, many were surprised it was a Latino-on-Latino incident. We'll talk about why the video is surprising and why it isn't.

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

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Monuments to Confederate generals and a church line Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va. Jay Paul/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Paul/Getty Images

The Unfinished Battle In the Capital Of The Confederacy

As calls to remove Confederate memorials grow louder, we head to Richmond, Va., where the veneration of Confederate leaders has been a source of local pride — and revulsion — for more than a century.

The Unfinished Battle In the Capital Of The Confederacy

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White supremacists descended on Charlottesville to protest the pending removal of the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

Charlottesville

After a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville spiraled into deadly violence, residents of the Virginia town do some soul-searching. Plus: a scholar on the politics of white resentment, and a GOP operative worries about the party's long-term future.

Charlottesville

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Christina Chung for NPR

Who's Your Great-Great-Great-Great Granddaddy?

Spit into a tube and get in touch with your ancestors! Or not. On this episode we interview the founder of a project that uses DNA tests to talk about race in America. And Kim TallBear, a Native American anthropologist, says why she thinks DNA tests don't really tell you much about yourself.

Who's Your Great-Great-Great-Great Granddaddy?

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The U.S. Census and Our Sense of Us

The Census is so much more than cold, hard data. It's about what we call ourselves, the ways we see ourselves and how we're represented. On this episode we ask the former head of the Census bureau why he quit. We talk about how the Census helped create 'Hispanic' identity. And we talk through some of the proposed race and ethnicity categories that may show up on the 2020 questionnaire.

The U.S. Census and Our Sense of Us

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Hip Hop deejays Stretch Armstrong (right) aka Adrian Bartos and Bobbito (left) aka Robert Garcia became legends on The Stretch Armstrong Show during the 1990s. Back then, they were hip hop tastemakers on college station WKCR in New York City. Now they're back together hosting "What's Good? With Stretch and Bobbito," an NPR podcast. Nickolai Hammar/NPR/. hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR/.

What's Good? Talking Hip-Hop and Race With Stretch & Bobbito

Shereen and Gene mix it up with the pioneering hip-hop radio hosts Stretch and Bobbito. These impresarios ran a legendary show in New York City during most of the 1990s. Now they're hosting an interview podcast featuring guests like Stevie Wonder, Dave Chappelle and Mahershala Ali.

What's Good? Talking Hip-Hop and Race With Stretch & Bobbito

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Is it cool for African-Americans to wear African tribal prints? Hana Baba and Leila Day of "The Stoop" podcast tackle the question. Neema Iyer for The Stoop hide caption

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Neema Iyer for The Stoop

What's So Wrong With African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

Leila Day and Hana Baba are hosts of a new podcast called The Stoop. It features conversations black people have amongst themselves — but rarely in public. The pair swing by to talk with Shereen and Gene about their show, and share an episode about a very thorny question: Can African-Americans wear clothing and accessories that originated with African cultures they're not familiar with?

What's So Wrong With African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

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In the era of body-cams and cellphones, the act of seeing police do their job is radically altering the public-police relationship, and changing civilian and police behavior and perceptions alike. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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A Police Video From Charlotte

This encore presentation goes deep on a case involving a white police officer and an unarmed black man in Charlotte, NC. Videos in police-involved shootings can add detail to these cases, but as our colleague Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast reports, what you see depends on who you are.

A Police Video From Charlotte

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Joe Jiang (left) and Simon Tam of The Slants, an Asian American band whose name is a racial slur, were in a legal battle over their band's name. The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided in the favor of trademark protection for The Slants. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

The Supreme Court Decides In Favor Of A Racial Slur...Now What?

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided in favor of Simon Tam, front man of the band The Slants. The group has been fighting the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for nearly a decade, for the right to use the slur.

The Supreme Court Decides In Favor Of A Racial Slur...Now What?

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It's Our Anniversary

Shereen and Gene celebrate our first year on the podcast. We take a look back to some memorable stories with updates from the team and some of our guests.

It's Our Anniversary

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Protesters gather outside the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Friday, June 16, 2017, after St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez was cleared in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile. Steve Karnowski/AP hide caption

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Steve Karnowski/AP

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

In the aftermath of the acquittal of the officer who shot and killed Philando Castile, Gene and Shereen speak to a reporter who has followed the case since the beginning. We also speak to a friend of Castile's.

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

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At an anti-Donald Trump protest in Anaheim, Calif. last year, before the election, "Anthony" and "America" said they saved the U.S. flag from a Trump supporter who was trying to get Latinos to trample it. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

Encore: 'You're A Grand Old Flag'

Why do some people of color embrace the American flag while others refuse to wave it? In this episode from the Code Switch archives, Gene Demby and Adrian Florido unpack the complicated patriotism and evolving use of the flag with immigrant rights protesters and Native American veterans.

Encore: 'You're A Grand Old Flag'

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"Racial imposter syndrome" is definitely "a thing," for many people. Shereen and Gene hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Social scientists weigh in the need basic need for belonging. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

A Prescription For "Racial Imposter Syndrome"

Shereen and Gene look at "racial imposter syndrome." It's what one listener described as feeling fake, or inauthentic, in her identity. We invited listeners to write in, and hundreds of bi-racial and multi-cultural people shared their views. We'll also talk to social scientists about the basic need for belonging and the role language plays in identity. Later, writer Heidi Durrow joins us. She's founder of The Mixed-Remixed Festival, the largest annual gathering of its kind in the U.S.

A Prescription For "Racial Imposter Syndrome"

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Code Switch looks into the underworld of white techno music producers in Detroit to pass themselves off as the original black artists/creators of the genre in order to sell their music. In some instances, they're even stealing the original musician's name and passing off as the creators of the music. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'

This week, we follow the strange trend of white dance-music DJs who pass themselves off as black artists. Gene talks to legendary House music DJ Ron Trent. The European producer Guy Tavares chimes in from The Netherlands on what he sees as overhyped controversy. Piotr Orlov, who covers dance music for NPR weighs in on what this all means for music fans.

'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'

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Alex Tizon and Lola, whose full name was Eudocia Tomas Pulido, photographed in Manila. Courtesy of Melissa Tizon hide caption

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Courtesy of Melissa Tizon

We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"

This week, we join the global conversation on The Atlantic's essay "My Family's Slave," in which Alex Tizon writes about Eudocia Tomas Pulido, who was his family's katulong, or domestic servant, for 56 years. Why did Eudocia's story hit such a raw nerve in the U.S. and the Philippines? Shereen and Gene talk to Vicente Rafael, a professor who has studied and written about the practice in his native Philippines. We also hear from Lydia Catina Amaya, a Filipina who was a katulong in the Philippines and the United States. And we talk to Melissa Tizon, the author's widow. Eudocia Tomas Pulido lived in their home for the last 12 years of her life.

We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"

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This week's podcast extra from Code Switch: Japanese Americans who avoided internment camps in the second world war. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah

The story of over 100,000 Japanese Americans enduring life in internment camps during WW II is well known, but a few thousand avoided the camps, entirely by, essentially, self-exiling. Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates talks with research historian Diana Tsuchida, about the hidden history of Japanese Americans who survived by creating farming communities, like the one in Keetley, Utah. We also hear directly from survivors about life as internally displaced American citizens.

Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah

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Alan Yang is the co-creator of the Netflix show Master of None, which recently released its second season. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Master of None's Alan Yang Unpacks Season 2

Gene and guest co-host Lenika Cruz, who covers culture at The Atlantic, welcome Alan Yang. He and comedian Aziz Ansari created an Emmy-winning comedy series that stepped comfortably out of the usual TV comfort zones. Master of None just premiered an already beloved second season, and Yang talks about making bold creative choices, crafting inclusive stories, and writing complex characters with an Asian American lead at the center of it all.

Master of None's Alan Yang Unpacks Season 2

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This week Shereen welcomes Kat Chow who spoke to David Henry Hwang, J.J. Briones and some theater experts about the controversial show and its role in both creating and limiting roles for Asian American actors. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

The Blessing (And Curse?) Of Miss Saigon

Miss Saigon has returned to Broadway. When the hit musical was first performed was controversial for its stereotypes and story and casting choices. Shereen is joined by teammate Kat Chow to explore Miss Saigon's journey in 2017.

The Blessing (And Curse?) Of Miss Saigon

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Kenya Barris is the executive producer of the family comedy Blackish and Shahidi plays Zoe, the eldest daughter in the Johnson family. There are hopes for a spin-off starring Shahidi's character going off to college. Meanwhile, Barris is piloting a few other TV shows for the fall-- including a comedy starring Felicity Huffman and Courtney B. Vance. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Talking Black-ish With Star Yara Shahidi And Creator Kenya Barris

Black-ish creator (Kenya) and the show's 17-year-old star (Yara) talk about what's next for them on TV and in real life. Kenya explains why he's never felt pressure to explain cultural jokes. Yara breaks down ways Gen Z is ahead of the rest of us. Plus, they preview a possible spin-off!

Talking Black-ish With Star Yara Shahidi And Creator Kenya Barris

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This week's podcast extra from Code Switch: Voices from the LA Riots 25 years later. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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The LA Unrest (Or Riots) 25 Years Later

We hear from a Latino city councilman who was there when it all went down, a Korean-American who worked at her family's gas station in Compton and a prominent black pastor who gave a memorable sermon to his South LA congregation. Oh, and we tag in our play cousins Mandalit Del Barco and David Greene for this one.

The LA Unrest (Or Riots) 25 Years Later

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John Leguizamo in Latin History For Morons at The Public Theater, his sixth one-man show. Joan Marcus/©2016 Joan Marcus hide caption

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Joan Marcus/©2016 Joan Marcus

John Leguizamo, Still In Search Of John Leguizamo

This week, Gene welcomes NPR's Audie Cornish to talk about multi-talented writer, producer and comedian John Leguizamo. As a performer, he's mined his Latino identity through his own family and old New York neighborhoods for decades. Audie interviewed Leguizamo in New York during the current run of his latest one-man show, Latin History For Morons. Now a father, Leguizamo struggles with what he knows and what he can teach his son and daughter about being Latino in the U.S., while challenging himself to be the dad he'd always wanted his own father to be.

John Leguizamo, Still In Search Of John Leguizamo

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