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How I Built This

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How I Built This is a podcast about innovators, entrepreneurs, and idealists, and the stories behind the movements they built. Each episode is a narrative journey marked by triumphs, failures, serendipity and insight — told by the founders of some of the world's best known companies and brands. If you've ever built something from nothing, something you really care about — or even just dream about it — check out How I Built This hosted by Guy Raz @guyraz. Follow the show @HowIBuiltThis.More from How I Built This »

Most Recent Episodes

Andrew Holder

Honest Tea: Seth Goldman

In 1997, after going for a long run, Seth Goldman was frustrated with the sugar-filled drinks at the corner market. So he brewed up a beverage in his kitchen, and turned it into Honest Tea.

Honest Tea: Seth Goldman

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Alli Webb's Drybar focuses on being the best at one thing: blow-drying hair. Andrew Holder hide caption

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Andrew Holder

Drybar: Alli Webb

A decade ago, full-time mom Alli Webb noticed a gap in the beauty market: there was nowhere that just focused on blow-drying hair. Now with 70 locations, Drybar is testament to Webb's motto: Focus on one thing and be the best at it.

Drybar: Alli Webb

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Andrew Holder

Zumba: Beto Perez & Alberto Perlman

Zumba began as a mistake: aerobics teacher Beto Perez brought the wrong music to class, then improvised a dance routine to go with it. For his students, it was more fun than work — and it eventually grew into one of the biggest fitness brands in the world.

Zumba: Beto Perez & Alberto Perlman

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Andrew Holder

Warby Parker: Dave Gilboa & Neil Blumenthal

In 2008, it was nearly impossible to buy a fashionable, affordable pair of glasses online. That simple frustration inspired the idea behind Warby Parker – and disrupted the eyewear industry.

Warby Parker: Dave Gilboa & Neil Blumenthal

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How Melissa and Doug Bernstein built a multi-million dollar toy company without screens, video games or apps. Andrew Holder for NPR hide caption

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Andrew Holder for NPR

Melissa & Doug: Melissa And Doug Bernstein

Melissa and Doug Bernstein's first success was a wooden 'fuzzy puzzle' of farm animals. Today, Melissa & Doug makes over 2,000 kinds of toys and serves as an antidote to the rise of digital toys.

Melissa & Doug: Melissa And Doug Bernstein

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Andrew Holder for NPR

Patagonia: Yvon Chouinard

In 1973, Yvon Chouinard started Patagonia to make climbing gear he couldn't find elsewhere. Over decades of growth, he has implemented a unique philosophy about business, leadership and profit.

Patagonia: Yvon Chouinard

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Andrew Holder for NPR

Serial Entrepreneur: Mark Cuban

Mark Cuban made millions off of tech startups, then billions off of stocks — and later went on to buy and revive the Dallas Mavericks. He has come to define the persona of the serial entrepreneur.

Serial Entrepreneur: Mark Cuban

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Angie's List: Angie Hicks

In 1996, Angie Hicks spent hours reading contractor reviews to members over the phone. Today, the online review and referral service, Angie's List, is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

Angie's List: Angie Hicks

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Herb Kelleher spent years in courtrooms to get the first Southwest Airline plane off the ground — but he loved the challenge. Andrew Holder for NPR hide caption

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Southwest Airlines: Herb Kelleher

In 1968, competitors sued to keep Herb Kelleher's new airline grounded. After a 3-year court fight, the first plane took off from Dallas. Today Southwest Airlines operates nearly 4,000 flights a day.

Southwest Airlines: Herb Kelleher

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Perhaps more than anyone, José Andrés, is responsible for the small plate revolution in American dining. Andrew Holder for NPR hide caption

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Celebrity Chef: José Andrés

As a kid, José Andrés tended fires for his father's backyard paella cookouts. Later, he trained with the best Spanish chefs, and began building a restaurant empire that would transform the way many Americans dine out.

Celebrity Chef: José Andrés

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