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Hosted by Joshua Johnson, inspired by the First Amendment, 1A champions America's right to speak freely. News with those who make the news, great guests and topical debate. Weekday conversation framed in ways to make you think, share and engage. From NPR and WAMU.More from 1A »

Most Recent Episodes

A Word On The Academy Awards

The nominees for the 89th annual Academy Awards are prepping their speeches — and this year, you can bet they'll be political. In this special podcast we'll talk about predictions, protests and whether the Oscars are passé. Joining Joshua Johnson are A.O. Scott, chief film critic at The New York Times, Aisha Harris, culture writer for Slate and Stephanie Merry, movie and pop culture reporter for The Washington Post.

A Word On The Academy Awards

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Friday News Roundup

Across the country, town halls are getting increasingly noisy, new rules worry millions who are undocumented and the DNC and CPAC come under the spotlight. In international news, America's charm offensive moves from Europe to Mexico, ISIS struggles to retain its grip on one of its key strongholds and Sweden finds itself forced on the defensive after one Fox News viewer wonders out loud why the country is in such a mess. Two panels of journalists join 1A guest host Indira Lakshmanan for analysis of the week's top news stories. Guests in the domestic hour include Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief for Vice, Olivier Knox, chief Washington correspondent at Yahoo! News and Salena Zito, a Pittsburgh-based reporter for the Washington Examiner. Guests in the international hour include Mark Landler, White House correspondent for The New York Times, Karoun Demirjian, reporter at Washington Post, Eli Lake, columnist for Bloomberg View and Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, international correspondent for NPR.

Friday News Roundup

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Religious Intolerance In The United States

America has long celebrated the nation's rich heritage of religious freedom. But recently, this First Amendment right has come under attack. For the first time — and after some pressure — President Trump earlier this week addressed the surge in anti-Semitic attacks across the country. The latest FBI statistics also show hate crimes against Muslims growing by more than 60 percent. So what's behind this spike in hate crimes? And is enough being done about it? 1A's guests include Imam Yahya Hendi, Director of Muslim Life at Georgetown University, Rabbi Shira Stutman, Senior Rabbi at Sixth & I Synagogue, Corey Saylor, Director of the Department to Monitor and Combat Islamophobia at Council on American-Islamic Relations, Jake Turx, White House Correspondent for Ami Magazine and Deborah Lauter, Senior Vice President of Policy and Programs at Anti-Defamation League.

Religious Intolerance In The United States

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Shopping As A Political Act

When Kevin Plank, the CEO of Under Armour, said having a business-focused president might be an asset for the United States, it set off a wave of criticism from celebrities, customers and citizens who disagree with President Trump's policies. Soon after, Plank ran a full-page ad in the Baltimore Sun walking back his statements. With each new political development, handfuls of consumers look to the leaders of their favorite brands for statements. But do votes cast with dollars really make a difference? Will not shopping at Nordstrom teach the company a lesson about not supporting the Trump family? Will deleting Uber affect the CEO's stance on immigration? And is it wise to tie politics and profits so closely together? John Donvan guest hosts for this discussion and speaks with Shannon Coulter, founder of Grab Your Wallet, Edward Walker, associate professor of sociology at UCLA and Elizabeth Dwoskin, Silicon Valley correspondent for the Washington Post.

Shopping As A Political Act

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New Rules, Fresh Concern On Immigration

The president's promise to get tough on immigration has taken an important step forward with the drafting and approval of new guidelines to give federal authorities more power to detain and deport undocumented immigrants. Late last week, Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly signed a pair of memos outlining plans for the agency to hire thousands of additional enforcement agents, expand the pool of immigrants who are prioritized for removal, speed up deportation hearings and enlist local law enforcement to help make arrests. The move has raised many questions and concerns about the immediate fate of millions of people who are in the country but are undocumented. Joining 1A for this conversation are Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent for Univision, Cecilia Muñoz, a top advisor to President Obama on immigration, Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, Cesar Vargas, co-director of the Dream Action Coalition and Shawn Moran, a border patrol agent in San Diego.

New Rules, Fresh Concern On Immigration

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Europe's "Existential Threat"

Europe has welcomed a distinguished delegation of American leaders: Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of Defense General James Mattis and Senator John McCain. In meetings with other world leaders in Munich and Brussels, these leaders were focused on smoothing international ruffled feathers and calming nerves over Donald Trump's new "America First" doctrine. Republican Senator McCain has already broken rank, telling an audience in Germany that the administration of President Trump is in "disarray." Guests included in 1A's discussion of Europe are Gérard Araud, French Ambassador to the United States, Kurt Volker, executive director at The McCain Institute, Julianne Smith, senior fellow and director of the Strategy and Statecraft Program at the Center for a New American Security and Tom Nuttall, Brussels correspondent and Charlemagne columnist for The Economist.

Europe's "Existential Threat"

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Friday News Roundup

A week of mixed messages over General Michael Flynn who – despite losing his job – was described by the president as a "wonderful man", the stock market hits a new high and Disney decides to drop YouTube's biggest star. Also, there's shock at the killing in broad daylight of Kim Jong-un's brother and Moscow worries the West by putting missiles where they said they wouldn't. Two panels join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top domestic and international news stories. Guests in the domestic hour include Byron York, chief political correspondent at The Washington Examiner, Ruth Marcus, deputy editorial page editor and columnist at Washington Post and Reid Wilson, national correspondent at The Hill. Guests in the international hour include Courtney Kube, national security producer at NBC News, Christian Caryl, editor of DemocracyPost at Washington Post and Yeganeh Torbati, a reporter for Reuters covering foreign policy.

Friday News Roundup

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Conservatives Make The Case For Action On Climate Change

Prominent Republicans — from former Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson to the former chair of the board of Walmart — are urging the White House and Congress to adopt a new market-based plan to address climate change. It establishes a carbon tax and dividend program. But would that reduce emissions? Will Republicans in office go for it? And what would happen to existing environmental regulations? Guests include Ted Halstead, founder, president and CEO of the Climate Leadership Council, Nathaniel Keohane, vice president at Environmental Defense Fund, Chris Mooney, energy and environment reporter for Washington Post, Greg Mankiw, professor of economics at Harvard University, and Kyle Meyaard-Schaap, national organizer and spokesperson for Young Evangelicals for Climate Action.

Conservatives Make The Case For Action On Climate Change

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The Rise And Fall Of The Original Black Elite

"The curse of prejudice is the hand-maid of ignorance," said Daniel Murray. Murray was assistant librarian at the Library of Congress in the late 19th century. He was also a member of the Black Elite, an exclusive group of educated, accomplished, and refined African Americans in and around Washington D.C. that formed after the Civil War. Author Elizabeth Dowling Taylor's new book The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era tells Murray's story, and in doing so, traces the rise and fall of the elite class in America.

The Rise And Fall Of The Original Black Elite

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The Economy Of Single Women

The number of unmarried people in the United States is on the rise, as more Americans are making the decision to marry later in life — if at all. This has created a new target for advertisers and brands: single women with disposable income. For the first time single women hold a sizable amount of social, political, and economic capital. We'll explore these new trends in marriage and partnership, and how businesses are adapting to them. Guests include Bella DePaulo, author of "Singled Out: How Singles Are Stereotyped, Stigmatized, and Ignored, and Still Live Happily Ever After", Chavie Lieber, senior reporter at Racked, Lisa Bonos, writer and editor for The Washington Post's Solo-ish, and Brittany Manson, creator of Alone in Atlanta.

The Economy Of Single Women

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