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Hosted by Joshua Johnson, inspired by the First Amendment, 1A champions America's right to speak freely. News with those who make the news, great guests and topical debate. Weekday conversation framed in ways to make you think, share and engage. From NPR and WAMU.More from 1A »

Most Recent Episodes

Fighting For The Facts: How To Tell What's News And What's Fiction

There's big money to be made warping reality, but now, some of the world's biggest newsrooms are setting themselves up to call out lies when they happen. Joshua Johnson talks with two media reporters about what can be done to fight what's often called "fake news," and the false accusations of "fake news." Plus, we'll hear from a news literacy expert for tips on how not to get duped by fiction masquerading as journalism.

Fighting For The Facts: How To Tell What's News And What's Fiction

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Inauguration Day – News Round Up

On Inauguration Day, Joshua Johnson wraps up a week that said goodbye to 44 – and will see the swearing in of 45. After reports about just how hot the planet got last year – an hour that attempts to shine some light on the news this week. A panel of top journalists joins 1A for analysis and commentary.

Inauguration Day – News Round Up

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The View From There

The President Elect says German Chancellor Angela Merkel made a 'catastrophic mistake' with her refugee policy. 1A hears from Germany's Ambassador to the U.S. Trump has also labelled Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "an embarrassment" – Joshua Johnson is also joined by the Canadian Ambassador. A diplomatic dialogue with Ambassadors from near and far. How do other governments view our new one?

The View From There

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Feminism And The Women's March On Washington

The feminist movement has always been about equality for all women, but there are many paths to that goal. One of them is this weekend's Women's March on Washington which began with a rallying cry on social media. But will the march follow a path toward more inclusiveness, toward equal pay, and to greater equality between men and women? And just what does it mean to be a feminist?

Feminism And The Women's March On Washington

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Lead, Landfills, and Low-Income Neighborhoods

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan is ongoing, and there have been even more devastating discoveries of contaminants like lead in water systems across the country. Many of the affected communities are poor and people of color. Why are these neighborhoods so often victimized when it comes to environmental health issues?

Lead, Landfills, and Low-Income Neighborhoods

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The Green Book & A Graceful Transfer Of Power

The Green Book was first published in 1936. It was a revolutionary publication which listed restaurants, bars and service stations which would serve African-Americans. Joshua Johnson talks with Alvin Hall about his BBC program 'The Green Book', which documents this little-known aspect of racial segregation. Also, the role of First Lady is a powerful one. The next to take on that high profile position is mother and former model Melania Trump. 1A looks at clues to how she may build her East Wing legacy and talk about how some of her predecessors famously handled the spotlight.

The Green Book & A Graceful Transfer Of Power

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Friday News Roundup – Domestic

Dodgy dossiers, a heartfelt farewell and the latest on the effort to repeal Obamacare. It's been a very busy start to the New Year and Joshua Johnson will break much of it down - on this week's Friday News Round Up. A panel of journalists joins Joshua for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

Friday News Roundup – Domestic

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Decoding Donald Trump's Testy News Conference

It was some spectacle. At his first news conference as president-elect, Donald Trump tossed aside accusations of sleazy behavior, he bulldozed his way through a wall of reporter's questions and announced who he had picked to run his company.

Decoding Donald Trump's Testy News Conference

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Yes, He Tried? Understanding Obama's Legacy

President Obama was all about hope. He leaves warning against fear. After his farewell address in Chicago, how will history judge his presidency? At 55 percent his job approval is equivalent to Ronald Reagan's at the same point, and ahead of Bill Clinton's. It is more than 20 points higher than George W. Bush's. But Donald Trump has promised to repeal the Affordable Care Act, possibly pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement on climate change and tear up the U.S.-Iran nuclear deal. Each would undo some of President Obama's most visible achievements. What does he leave behind?

Yes, He Tried? Understanding Obama's Legacy

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Obamacare On Life Support

What would happen to you tomorrow if the Affordable Care Act was repealed tonight? We asked our listeners to share their questions, concerns and stories about health coverage under the ACA, also known as Obamacare. We also talked to Julie Rovner from Kaiser Health News and Dan Diamond from Politico about what "repeal and replace" would look like for 20 million Americans.

Obamacare On Life Support

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