1A Hosted by Joshua Johnson, inspired by the First Amendment, 1A champions America's right to speak freely. News with those who make the news, great guests and topical debate. Weekday conversation framed in ways to make you think, share and engage. From NPR and WAMU.
1A podcast tile
NPR

1A

From NPR

Hosted by Joshua Johnson, inspired by the First Amendment, 1A champions America's right to speak freely. News with those who make the news, great guests and topical debate. Weekday conversation framed in ways to make you think, share and engage. From NPR and WAMU.More from 1A »

Most Recent Episodes

Weekend Special: Sex, Race And Pop Music

Can you complete this song lyric?: A-wop-bop-alu-bop-a-wop-bam-boom, Tutti Frutti, ______. "Aw rooty" is on the record of Little Richard's seminal hit, but the original rhyme was "good booty." And that's where NPR music critic Ann Powers gets the title of her new book, "Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music." It's a decades-old cliche that parents complain their kids' music is far more sexual than what they grew up with, but history teaches us that's not true. After a long week, sit back, relax and enjoy our conversation on hip-shaking music history. Click here for our Spotify playlist of songs mentioned in the book. As you may expect, not all the lyrics may be suitable for all listeners. http://the1a.org/shows/2017-08-15/good-booty

Weekend Special: Sex, Race And Pop Music

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544483432/544514696" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The News Roundup

A single story dominated the news cycle this week: the tragedy that took the life of a young woman in Charlottesville, Virginia and the president's controversial responses to the events that led to her death. We discuss the White House, white supremacy and where the president's agenda goes from here. Then, the high-tension verbal sparring between North Korea and the U.S., Vice President Mike Pence's trip to Latin America and the world sends condolences to Spain after a van attack killed at least 13 people and injured about 80 others. Discussing domestic news is Geoff Bennett, White House reporter for NPR, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, domestic affairs correspondent for The New York Times and Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent for Univision. Discussing international news is James Kitfield, senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, Nadia Bilbassy, Washington bureau chief of Al Arabiya and Mark Lander, White House correspondent for The New York Times. After we held this conversation, the White House announced chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving his job, effective today. We'll have more on the post-Bannon White House next week on 1A.

The News Roundup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544533687/544547651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Next Chapter For Dystopian Literature

Today's book lovers are hungry for stories of dark, dystopian futures. Novels like "1984," "The Handmaid's Tale" and "Parable of the Sower" are hard to keep in stock these days. But what's inspiring the next generation of dystopian narratives? Our panel of authors talks about how current events, national politics and international relations inspire their new work and appeal to an audience with an affinity for apocalyptic endings. We're joined by Cory Doctorow, science fiction author and co-editor of the blog Boing Boing, N.K. Jemisin, bestselling author of the "Inheritance" series and the "Broken Earth" trilogy, Paola Bacigalupi, bestselling author of more than a half-dozen books including "The Wind-Up Girl" and "The Water Knife," and Omar el Akkad, award-winning journalist and author of "American War." Join us tomorrow for the Friday News Roundup. More at www.the1a.org

The Next Chapter For Dystopian Literature

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544276799/544279926" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Monumental Problem

The debate over Confederate monuments and memorials often boils down to history versus hate...and it's heating up again. This week, a group of activists in Durham, North Carolina toppled a statue of a rebel soldier in a scene reminiscent of Baghdad in April of 2003. It was part of a nationwide response to the violence that unfolded at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last week where many Confederate flags flew alongside swastikas and racist signs carried by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other hate groups. Is there a way to deal with Confederate imagery without forgetting the lessons of the past? Our guests are Jillian Johnson, at-large member of the Durham, N.C. City Council; Jonathan Horn, author of "The Man Who Would Not Be Washington"; Derek Alderman, professor of cultural geography at the University of Tennessee; Phil Wilayto, editor of the Virginia Defender; and Thomas Strain, Jr., commander-in-chief of Sons of Confederate Veterans.

A Monumental Problem

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543961651/543962333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What Can I Do To Stop Hate Groups?

The violent racism we saw in Charlottesville, Virginia is not new. But after last weekend's attack, many people are looking for new ideas about how to stop extremists. Is there an effective way to stop hate, stay safe and still preserve everyone's First Amendment rights? To discuss it we're joined by Peter Bergen, national security analyst for CNN and author of "United States of Jihad: Investigating America's Homegrown Terrorists," Don Harmon, a state senator in Illinois, Zeynep Tufekci, assistant professor in the School of Information at UNC-Chapel Hill, Sammy Rangel, executive director and co-founder of Life After Hate and Lecia Brooks, outreach director at the Southern Poverty Law Center. This afternoon — after we held this conversation — President Trump defended some who attended the "Unite The Right" rally in Charlottesville, saying "I've condemned many different groups, but not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch." We'll have reaction to President Trump's comments, and ask where the national conversation goes from here, this week on 1A.

What Can I Do To Stop Hate Groups?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543737812/543749656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Charlottesville And The White Supremacists

What started as a rally by white supremacists in Virginia this weekend ended in terror Saturday as a car slammed into a group that was protesting the rally, killing at least one person and injuring 19 others. The tension had been high since Friday, when a group of torch-bearing white nationalists — some giving a Nazi salute — descended on the University of Virginia campus to protest the potential removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. After Saturday's deadly violence, President Donald Trump said, "we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides ... on many sides." The president's initial response was met with criticism, with members of his own party labeling it too vague. President Trump spoke again today, saying "racism is evil." Joining us to discuss what happened in Charlottesville are NPR reporter Sarah McCammon, Rich Benjamin, author of "Searching for Whitopia: An Improbable Journey to the Heart of White America," Meredith Clark, a media studies professor at UVA and Jameta Barlow, a Charlottesville native and assistant professor of women's and gender studies at Towson University.

Charlottesville And The White Supremacists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543493981/543500325" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The News Roundup

This week, the News Roundup comes to you from WWNO New Orleans Public Radio. We'll talk about increasing tensions with North Korea, a predawn raid of the home of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, a declaration that the opioid crisis is a national emergency and we'll hear from a local reporter about severe floods in New Orleans. In international news, tensions are running high in Kenya after another contested election and South Africa's president has survived another no-confidence vote. Discussing domestic news is Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent for NPR, Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief for Vice News and Abby Phillip, national political reporter for the Washington Post. Discussing international news is Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, Noel King, correspondent for NPR's Planet Money podcast and Hannah Allam, national reporter covering U.S. Muslim life for BuzzFeed News.

The News Roundup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542863151/542885759" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Figuring Out North Korea | What It's Like To Report On Race Today

Some of the first journalists to specialize in reporting on race were ... white men. They doggedly covered the civil rights movement for local and national outlets, bringing needed attention to the ways America's social and political systems were stacked against the nation's black citizens. These days, the race beat still exists, but it's occupied by a more diverse group of journalists. Today we're asking some of the beat's most prominent reporters how they approach their assignments. We're joined by Tanzina Vega, national race and inequality reporter for CNN, Errin Haines Whack, race and ethnicity reporter for The Associated Press, Julia Craven, race and civil rights reporter for The Huffington Post and Hank Klibanoff, director of the journalism program at Emory University. First, we'll discuss the escalating tension between the U.S. and North Korea — and how we got here —with Thomas Hubbard, former U.S. ambassador to South Korea and Sheila Smith, senior fellow for Japan studies at The Council on Foreign Relations. After we held this conversation, President Trump doubled down on his tough talk on North Korea. We'll have those comments and reaction tomorrow on The News Roundup.

Figuring Out North Korea | What It's Like To Report On Race Today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542688902/542690200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What You Say Will Be Held Against You

Does Google need a new motto? Instead of "Don't Be Evil" how about "Don't Go There"? Google fired an employee this week for a memo suggesting that innate differences between men and women explain why women lag behind in the tech sector. Google says he crossed a line, but some think the company went too far. Joining guest host John Donvan to discuss it are Nitasha Tiku, senior writer at Wired, David Scher, a partner at the Employment Law Group, Bruce Barry, professor of management at Vanderbilt University and Simma Lieberman, a diversity and inclusion consultant based in Palo Alto. We'll end the show talking about vacation from work ... and why so many don't take it. We discuss our "no-vacation" nation with Lee Burbage, chief people officer at The Motley Fool. Then, a remembrance of musician Glen Campbell with singer/songwriter Kristian Bush, one half of the group Sugarland.

What You Say Will Be Held Against You

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542480299/542484462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When People With Autism Encounter Police | Collusion in the NFL?

People with autism shouldn't get mistaken as criminals. But they do. Evidence suggests people with autism experience seven times the number of encounters with police that most of us do — and almost never in a good way. How do we fix that? Guest host John Donvan is joined by Emily Iland, an autism advocate and educator, Barry Prizant, author of "Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism," Michael John Carley, who has Asperger syndrome and founded GRASP, the Global and Regional Asperger Syndrome Partnership, and Carolyn Gammicchia, a former police officer who founded L.E.A.N On Us, a law enforcement awareness network. First, let's talk about Colin Kaepernick. The NFL pre-season is halfway over and the quarterback still hasn't been signed to a team. Kaepernick gained attention outside sports circles last year when he declined to stand during the pre-game national anthem. Are NFL teams too afraid to take on an activist athlete? We're joined by William Rhoden, writer-at-large for ESPN's The Undefeated.

Listen to episode

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542303081/542313428" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top