Pallbearers carry the flag-draped coffin of Francois Jacob, Nobel Prize-winner and World War II veteran, in Paris on April 24. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

Remembrances

Lost In 2013: Three Nobel Scientists Who Saw Something In Us

Three groundbreaking scientists, all of whom won the Nobel Prize for their discoveries, died in 2013. Francois Jacob figured out how genes work. Frederick Sanger, who sequenced the first genome, is one of only four people to win two Nobel Prizes. David Hubel found out how to listen to the brain.

Buster Voodoo Rodrigo y Gabriela
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Pallbearers carry the flag-draped coffin of Francois Jacob, Nobel Prize-winner and World War II veteran, in Paris on April 24. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

Lost In 2013: Three Nobel Scientists Who Saw Something In Us

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FBI investigator Robert Ressler pioneered the practice of criminal profiling and is credited with coining the term "serial killer." He died on May 5. Paul Harris/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Harris/Getty Images

The FBI Investigator Who Coined The Term 'Serial Killer'

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Lavonne "Pepper" Paire Davis (front row, second from the right) played for the Fort Wayne Daisies in 1945. Courtesy of Kelly Candaele hide caption

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Courtesy of Kelly Candaele

'League Of Their Own' Inspiration Didn't Mind A Dirty Skirt

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Eydie Gorme was most famous for being half of the husband-and-wife singing duo Steve and Eydie, with her husband, Steve Lawrence. In August, Gorme passed away at the age of 84. AP hide caption

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AP

Remembering Eydie Gorme, A Vegas Singer Without The Drama

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What Did I Have That I Don't Have Eydie Gorme
Deception Miles Davis

Ryan Bingham performs at Autism Speaks' third Annual Blue Jean Ball on Oct. 24 in Los Angeles. Angela Weiss/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/Getty Images

From Rodeo To Radio: Ryan Bingham's Wild Ride

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Heart of Rhythm Ryan Bingham
Look Around The Corner Quantic & His Combo Bárbaro & Alice Russell
Window Doug Martsch
Clapper Action Figure Party & Yuval Gabay