All Things Considered Hear the All Things Considered program for October 18, 2017

David Mifflin says there have been multiple unauthorized attempts to open credit cards in his name since his Social Security number was stolen. Courtesy of David Mifflin hide caption

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Courtesy of David Mifflin

Business

After Equifax Hack, Calls For Big Changes In Credit Reporting Industry

The largest known theft of Social Security numbers in history has lawmakers, law enforcement and identity theft victims angry. They're calling for better security and other changes in the system.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., leaders of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, meet before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Draft Of Health Care Bill Addresses Trump Concerns About 'Bailouts' For Insurers

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Phone Call Mtbrd
Yellow Bird Pretty Lights
Wanderlust Esbe
Courage [For Hugh Maclennan] The Tragically Hip
Finding Parking Joey Pecoraro
Morning Sunrise Stage Kids

In the musical KPOP, Ashley Park plays the Korean pop star Mwe, one of the show's emotional centers. Ben Arons/Courtesy of KPOP hide caption

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Ben Arons/Courtesy of KPOP

A New Musical — And Its Audience — Grapple With Asian Identity, Through K-Pop

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U Mean I'm Not Black Sheep
Sundown Dyalla
Discovery Ultraship
Bigtooth Aspen Martin Gauffin
In the Moonlight Blithe Field
Kodokunohatsumei toe
Static Orphans The Barr Brothers
How's your day Sawagi
Capable The Wild Reeds

Rasika chef Vikram Sunderam, here with a towering dish of eggplant and potato, says, "Indian cuisine is a very personal cuisine. It's made from family to family, how they like to cook." Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

In New Cookbook, Acclaimed Indian Restaurant Finally Spills Its Secrets

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