All Things Considered Hear the All Things Considered program for September 20, 2017

Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Shots - Health News

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

Researchers disabled a gene that they think helps determine which human embryos will develop normally. The technique they used is controversial because it could be used to change babies' DNA.

Rescue workers search for earthquake survivors in Mexico City on Wednesday. Miguel Tovar/AP hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/AP

Mexico City Doomed By Its Geology To More Earthquakes

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Irma and Oscar Sanchez were apprehended by the Border Patrol when they took their infant son, Isaac, to a children's hospital to have emergency surgery. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Border Patrol Arrests Parents While Infant Awaits Serious Operation

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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Actress Nadine Malouf makes kubah as she tells stories about Syria's civil war in Oh My Sweet Land. Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates hide caption

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Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates

In Kitchens Across New York, 'Oh My Sweet Land' Serves Up Stories Of Syria

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Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen says the process of unwinding the central bank's massive bond holdings will be gradual. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Fed's Unwinding Of Crisis Programs Expected To Push Up Interest Rates Very Gradually

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Antonio Santamaria (left), Emilia Rubalcaba, Veronica Segredo, Louis Perez, and Olivia Geller. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Miami Fourth-Graders Write About Their Experiences With Hurricanes

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