Thursday

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Residents stand at the entrance of Aung Mingalar, a Rohingya quarter of Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar. All but 4,000 of the neighborhood's 15,000 mostly Rohingya residents either fled or were forced to move to internment camps after violence between Buddhists and Muslims in 2012 killed about 200 people. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Parallels

Barricaded In, Myanmar's Rohingya Struggle To Survive In Ghettos And Camps

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Tuesday

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Dana Bowerman's lifelong best friend Michelle Elliott holds a photograph of the two together. Bowerman is serving a nearly 20-year sentence for federal drug conspiracy charges. She was holding out hope for clemency for nonviolent drug offenders but it is unlikely that she will receive an early release date. Matthew Ozug/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Matthew Ozug/NPR

It's All Politics

After Hope For Early Release, Prisoners' Applications Stuck In Limbo

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Tuesday

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American tourists, like these visitors taking a guided tour in May, still have to provide one of 12 authorized reasons — such as visiting family or engaging in humanitarian work — for travel to Cuba. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Desmond Boylan/AP

Parallels

U.S.-Cuba Ties Are Restored, But Most American Tourists Will Have To Wait

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The Red Cross funded these homes in the Parc Tony Colin community in Bon Repos, Haiti, after the 2010 earthquake, but residents say the structures are starting to deteriorate from water damage. Newly obtained internal reports raise questions about how the Red Cross spent nearly $500 million in Haiti. Marie Arago for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marie Arago for NPR

Goats and Soda

Documents Show Red Cross May Not Know How It Spent Millions In Haiti

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