Thursday

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Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, waves to the crowd in a public gathering Tuesday during his visit to the city of Qom, 78 miles south of the capital Tehran. His trip is widely seen as an attempt to shore up his own status and legitimacy after last year's contentious presidential elections, in which he supported President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Office of the Supreme Leader/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Office of the Supreme Leader/AP

Middle East

Iran's Supreme Leader Seeks To Repair Reputation

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Friends and relatives mourn as they carry the coffin of Iraqi journalist Riyadh al-Sarai during his funeral procession in Baghdad last month. Unknown gunmen intercepted Sarai's car and killed him with silenced pistols. A British newspaper recently reported that magnetic bombs had killed more than 700 people this year, with another 600 shot and killed by silenced guns in a growing wave of targeted violence. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Khalid Mohammed/AP

Iraq

'Sticky' Bombs, Guns With Silencers Take Toll In Iraq

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Sunday

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President Obama, shown last week arriving at a town hall meeting sponsored by MTV and BET, has renewed his call for $50 billion to improve roadways and airports. But with nervous lawmakers worried about their jobs, that may be a tough sell. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Economy

Fed-Up Voters Want The Right Party For The Job(s)

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Construction worker Jimmy Martinez works at a site funded by federal stimulus money in Lakewood, Colo. Economic historian Niall Ferguson cautions that another stimulus would carry tremendous risk. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Economy

Could Another Stimulus Help Rebuild The Economy?

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Saturday

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Friday

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Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland (left) and Republican challenger John Kasich at an Oct. 7 debate in Toledo. Nathan Daschle, the executive director of the Democratic Governors Association, points to the help Strickland's efforts gave to the Obama campaign in 2008 as an example of how governors can influence the presidential election. Andy Morrison/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Andy Morrison/AP

Election 2010

What's At Stake In 2010 Governors' Races

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Thursday

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A piece of the ruptured pipeline from last month's fatal accident in San Bruno, Calif., displayed in a laboratory at the National Transportation Safety Board's training center in Ashburn, Va. A preliminary NTSB report says a power failure led to a brief change in pipeline pressure but does not say that the pressure change caused the blast that killed eight people and destroyed 37 homes. Luis Alvarez/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Luis Alvarez/AP

Around the Nation

Answers Still Elusive In San Bruno Pipeline Blast

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Wednesday

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Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad waves to the crowds from the sunroof of his SUV upon his arrival in Beirut on Wednesday. Thousands of cheering Lebanese welcomed Ahmadinejad to Lebanon, throwing rose petals and sweets at his motorcade at the start of a visit that underscores a growing recognition of Iran as a power broker in the region. Mahmoud Tawil/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mahmoud Tawil/AP

Middle East

Iranian Leader's Visit Raises Tensions In Lebanon

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Tuesday

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