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Emergency personnel work on Jan 8 at the scene where Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, (D-AZ) and others were shot outside a Safeway grocery store in Tucson, Ariz. Nearly anyone at the scene that day will be at risk for post traumatic stress disorder, but it's difficult to predict who will be affected. Matt York/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt York/AP

Arizona Rampage: Congresswoman, Others Shot

Mental Health In Focus After Shooting In Arizona

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Friday

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Pam Simon, an outreach coordinator for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, smiles as she visits the congresswoman's Tucson office Friday only days after being shot in the wrist and chest during the rampage that critically injured Giffords. Nineteen people were shot, six fatally. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ross D. Franklin/AP

Arizona Rampage: Congresswoman, Others Shot

Giffords' Staffers: 'The Office Is Open'

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Thursday

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It was Christiane Benson's diagnosis with juvenile Batten disease in 2008 that inspired her parents to start the Beyond Batten Disease Foundation and to develop the universal carrier screening test. Courtesy of Charlotte Benson hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Charlotte Benson

Humans

New Genetic Test Screens Would-Be Parents

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Wednesday

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Scientists are investigating whether bad weather, fireworks or poison might have forced more than 3,000 red-winged blackbirds out of the sky, or if a disoriented bird simply led the flock into the ground. Assistant State Veterinarian Brandon Doss examines a carcass at the Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission Diagnostic Laboratory in Little Rock. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Danny Johnston/AP

Animals

Puzzling Demise Of Arkansas' Red-Winged Blackbird

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