Most of us have never been submerged under more than a few feet underwater. But just a few meters down, the water compresses the tissues of your body so that you become more dense. At that point, "You're more likely to sink than float," says Dr. Kevin Fong. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Author Interviews

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

In his new book, Dr. Kevin Fong explores how humans survive extremes of heat, cold, outer space and deep sea. "We're still exploring the human body and what medicine can do in the same way that the great explorers of the 20th century and every age before them explored the world," he says.

Most of us have never been submerged under more than a few feet underwater. But just a few meters down, the water compresses the tissues of your body so that you become more dense. At that point, "You're more likely to sink than float," says Dr. Kevin Fong. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

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