Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says. Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Interviews

One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'

Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox has traveled around the globe to hear whispering arches and singing sand dunes. Closer to home, he can also explain why your singing sounds better in the shower.

In 1975, Shoah director Claude Lanzmann (left) interviewed Benjmain Murmelstein, the last surviving Elder of the Jews of the Czech Theresienstadt ghetto, at his home in Rome. The resulting film is The Last of the Unjust. Cohen Media Group hide caption

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Movie Reviews

For A Rabbi Who Worked With The Nazis, Is Judgment 'Unjust'?

Claude Lanzmann's documentary profiles a Viennese rabbi put to work in a Czech concentration camp. Although Benjamin Murmelstein was himself not a free man, he was despised by fellow Jewish prisoners.

Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says. Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images
One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'
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In 1975, Shoah director Claude Lanzmann (left) interviewed Benjmain Murmelstein, the last surviving Elder of the Jews of the Czech Theresienstadt ghetto, at his home in Rome. The resulting film is The Last of the Unjust. Cohen Media Group hide caption

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For A Rabbi Who Worked With The Nazis, Is Judgment 'Unjust'?
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Thursday

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Politics

In New Political Warfare, 'Armies Of Video Trackers' Swarm Candidates

New Yorker writer Jane Mayer discusses conservative activist James O'Keefe's latest botched sting operation, and the new kind of political opposition research O'Keefe pioneered.

In New Political Warfare, 'Armies Of Video Trackers' Swarm Candidates
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Malachi Kirby plays Kunta Kinte in the updated version of the miniseries Roots. Steve Dietl/The History Channel hide caption

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Television

In Its Retelling, 'Roots' Is Powerful, Must-See Television

This weekend, an eight-hour remake of the 1977 miniseries begins airing on A&E, Lifetime and The History Channel. TV critic David Bianculli says the new Roots deserves to be seen and talked about.

In Its Retelling, 'Roots' Is Powerful, Must-See Television
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Wednesday

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Author Interviews

'Mirror Test' Reflects On The Consequences Of The Wars In Iraq And Afghanistan

While serving as a State Department adviser in Iraq and Afghanistan, J. Kael Weston instigated a military mission that resulted the death of 31 service members. His memoir revisits the tragedy of war.

'Mirror Test' Reflects On The Consequences Of The Wars In Iraq And Afghanistan
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Book Reviews

4 First-Rate Thrillers Deliver A Summer Of Suspenseful Reading

The suspense stories on Maureen Corrigan's early summer reading list roam from the beaches of Long Island to the Welsh coast, and from the mean streets of Chicago to the alleyways of Berlin.

4 First-Rate Thrillers Deliver A Summer Of Suspenseful Reading
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Tuesday

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In the fourth season of the IFC show Maron, Marc Maron's character becomes addicted to opioids and loses his house, cats and podcast. Tyler Golden/IFC hide caption

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Television

Marc Maron On Sobriety And Managing His 'Uncomfortable' Comfort Zone

The comic recently played out his own fictional relapse on his IFC show, Maron. He says relapse is "a very real fear of mine. I'm glad it happened in fiction and not in real life."

Marc Maron On Sobriety And Managing His 'Uncomfortable' Comfort Zone
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Commentary

Irked By The Way Millennials Speak? 'I Feel Like' It's Time To Loosen Up

While some of his colleagues have criticized the current trend of starting sentences with the phrase, "I feel like," linguist Geoff Nunberg says it's just a case of generational misunderstanding.

Irked By The Way Millennials Speak? 'I Feel Like' It's Time To Loosen Up
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