Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Salt

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes.

Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

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