Monday

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Music Articles

The Black Keys: The Fresh Air Interview

Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney of The Black Keys join Terry Gross for a discussion of their musical influences, their recent album Brothers and why Stephen Colbert recently accused them of "selling out."

The Black Keys: The Fresh Air Interview

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La Lupe in New York, 1967. Courtesy of Richie Viera's Archive/Fania Records hide caption

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Friday

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Walton Goggins plays bad boy Boyd Crowder, a complicated white supremacist who bombs a black church in the pilot episode of Justified — and then goes on to become a born-again Christian in prison, claiming that he now has a new mission in life. FX hide caption

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Television

Walton Goggins: Playing Brother Boyd On 'Justified'

The Southern actor discusses playing a white supremacist turned born-again Christian on the critically acclaimed FX series Justified — and how he gets into the mind-set to play one of TV's worst bad boys.

Walton Goggins: Playing Brother Boyd On 'Justified'

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Wanda Jackson and The Party Ain't Over producer Jack White. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Articles

Wanda Jackson: Getting The 'Party' Started

The Queen of Rockabilly has just released a new album with Jack White of The White Stripes. In 2003, Jackson sat down with Terry Gross to explain why she switched from country to rock.

Wanda Jackson: Getting The 'Party' Started

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Jason Statham (right) plays Arthur Bishop, a hit man who must teach his former mentor's son Steve (Ben Foster) how to kill. Patti Perret/CBS Films hide caption

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Movies

'The Mechanic': A Crisp Thriller From Mr. Man-Crush

British actor Jason Statham plays a professional hit man in The Mechanic, based on a 1972 Charles Bronson thriller. Critic John Powers says the film offers a revealing look at Statham's distinctive appeal.

'The Mechanic': A Crisp Thriller From Mr. Man-Crush

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Thursday

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Handguns on display at a gun show in Las Vegas this month. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.

After Tucson Shootings, NRA Again Shows Its Strength

The shootings put gun control back on the political radar screen. But political scientist Robert Spitzer says legislative changes are unlikely because of the relationship Congress has with the NRA.

After Tucson Shootings, NRA Again Shows Its Strength

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Singer Charlie Louvin performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on May 4, 2008. Michael Buckner/ Staff/Getty Images Entertainment hide caption

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Music Articles

Charlie Louvin: Remembering Country's Harmonizer

The Louvin Brothers, Ira and Charlie, were considered one of the all-time great country-music duos. Fresh Air remembers Charlie, who died Wednesday, with highlights from a 1996 interview.

Charlie Louvin: Remembering Country's Harmonizer

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Wednesday

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Betty Friedan, the late author of The Feminine Mystique, is shown in her New York apartment May 25, 1970. Anthony Camerano/AP hide caption

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Country Joe at Woodstock. Bear Family Records hide caption

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Music Articles

'Next Stop Is Vietnam': The War In Music

A recent 13-CD box set called Next Stop Is Vietnam: The War on Record 1961-2008 documents the music that dominated the airwaves during the Vietnam War. Rock historian Ed Ward says the compilation could have used some "conscientious curation."

'Next Stop Is Vietnam': The War In Music

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Tuesday

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Economist Paul Krugman says the European economic crisis has "all the aspects of a classical Greek tragedy." iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Economy

Paul Krugman: The Economic Failure Of The Euro

Using a shared currency has made it difficult for Europe to recover from its economic crisis, Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman says. He explains why the euro experiment may fail — and what that would mean for the global trading system.

Paul Krugman: The Economic Failure Of The Euro

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Author Kenneth Slawenski lives in New Jersey. He founded the website DeadCaulfields.com, and has been researching J.D. Salinger: A Life for the past eight years.   hide caption

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Monday

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The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Smithsonian Institute/via Flickr hide caption

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Space

A Physicist Explains Why Parallel Universes May Exist

It is possible that there are many other universes that exist parallel to our universe. Theoretical physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe, explains how that's possible in the new book, The Hidden Reality.

A Physicist Explains Why Parallel Universes May Exist

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Friday

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Author Reynolds Price poses in his Durham, N.C., home June 8, 1998. Price, the author of more than 30 books, died Thursday. He taught at Duke University for more than 50 years. Grant Halverson/AP hide caption

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Remembrances

Reynolds Price: A Southern Writer, A Lyrical Gift

Reynolds Price, the acclaimed writer known for his evocative novels and stories about rural North Carolina, died in Durham on Thursday. He was 77. Fresh Air remembers the writer with excerpts taken from several interviews he gave over the past 20 years.

Reynolds Price: A Southern Writer, A Lyrical Gift

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Wilfrid Sheed, author of a wide range of books, novels and non-fiction died Thursday at the age of 80. He was born in London in 1930 into a literary family; his parents founded the prominent Catholic publishing house Sheed & Ward. Leonard McComb/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image hide caption

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Remembrances

Remembering Wilfrid Sheed, A Master Of Wit

Wilfrid Sheed, the satirical British essayist known for bringing his trademark wit to a wide range of novels, reviews and nonfiction books, died this week. He was 80. Fresh Air remembers the writer with excerpts from a 1988 interview.

Remembering Wilfrid Sheed, A Master Of Wit

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From left to right: percussionist Sara Lund, vocalist Corin Tucker and producer, arranger and multi-instrumentalist Seth Lorinczi. John Clark hide caption

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Music Reviews

Corin Tucker: '1,000 Years' Of Emotional Longing

Tucker, a founding member of the band Sleater-Kinney, is back with a new group, The Corin Tucker Band, and an album called 1,000 Years. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the record has an "air of heavy but often beautiful melancholy."

Corin Tucker: '1,000 Years' Of Emotional Longing

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Emma (Natalie Portman) just wants to sleep with Adam (Ashton Kutcher) — she doesn't expect him to fall in love with her. Dale Robinette/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Movies

'No Strings Attached': Corny, Contrived, Conservative

In No Strings Attached, Natalie Portman plays a medical resident who wants to sleep with her friend, played by Ashton Kutcher, with none of the messy emotions that come with a relationship. Critic David Edelstein says the film is calculated — and not particularly good.

'No Strings Attached': Corny, Contrived, Conservative

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Thursday

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High school players will experience more than 40,000 concussions this season. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin on Fox News Channel's Hannity, Jan. 17, 2011. FoxNews.com hide caption

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Commentary

How Traumatic Events Change Our View Of Language

Linguist Geoff Nunberg reflects on the recent shooting in Tucson, Arizona, arguing that traumatic events make people self-conscious about their language — and perhaps, rightfully so.

How Traumatic Events Change Our View Of Language

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Wednesday

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Health Care

Lowering Medical Costs By Providing Better Care

In this week's New Yorker, Atul Gawande asks whether it's possible to lower medical costs by giving the neediest patients better care. Gawande says that primary care physicians who target the chronically ill are the new leaders in health care reform.

Lowering Medical Costs By Providing Better Care

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Sargent Shriver with Eunice Kennedy Shriver in 1992. AP Photo hide caption

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Remembrances

Sargent Shriver: A Man Of Public Service

Sargent Shriver, the founding director of the Peace Corps and the architect of President Johnson's War on Poverty, died on Tuesday. He was 95. Shriver spoke to Terry Gross in 1995 about his role in the War on Poverty.

Sargent Shriver: A Man Of Public Service

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Tuesday

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Author Interviews

An Army Wife Reflects On 'When The Men Are Gone'

Debut author Siobhan Fallon writes about the lives of soldiers and their families in her new short story collection, You Know When the Men Are Gone. Families, she says, take the strangeness of deployment and learn how to create a new normal.

An Army Wife Reflects On 'When The Men Are Gone'

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Jackie Weaver (right, with Sullivan Stapleton) plays the matriarch of a Melbourne-based crime family who has an inappropriate relationship with her sons. John Tsiavis/Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Movie Interviews

Weaver and Michod Go Inside 'Animal Kingdom'

In the film Animal Kingdom, Australian actress Jackie Weaver plays the matriarch of a criminal family who has a twisted relationship with her sons. Weaver and Animal Kingdom's director Michael Michod discuss their unglamorous portrayal of a crime syndicate.

Weaver and Michod Go Inside 'Animal Kingdom'

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The Decemberists' new album, The King Is Dead, is out Tuesday. Autumn de Wilde/EMI Music hide caption

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Music Articles

The Decemberists' New Album Fit For A 'King'

The Decemberists' albums have been characterized by a wide variety of styles, from indie-rock minimalism to art-rock expansiveness. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the band's new album, The King Is Dead, is its best album so far.

The Decemberists' New Album Fit For A 'King'

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